Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

Share             
  1. #1
    Science Editor SHAMAS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Midlands, UK
    Posts
    6,442
    Thanks
    2451
    Pakistan UK

    Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/pakis...-lateststories

    Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain


    A Pakistani court has accepted a petition seeking direction to the government to bring back Koh-i-Noor from British Queen Elizabeth-II, overruling the objection to the plea for the famed diamond, which India has been trying to get from the UK for years.

    Lahore High Court Justice Khalid Mahmood Khan yesterday overruled the objection by the court's registrar office to the petition which has named Queen Elizabeth II and British High Commission in Pakistan respondents in the case.

    The plea filed by Barrister Javed Iqbal Jaffry made Pakistan's claim over the 105-carat gem on the basis that it supposedly hailed from the territory that was originally British India, but became Pakistan after partition in 1947.

    The court directed the office to fix the petition before any appropriate bench for hearing.

    In December last year, the registrar office's had dismissed the plea terming it as non-maintainable and said that the court had no jurisdiction to hear the case against the British Queen.

    The petitioner filed a fresh application in the high court pleading that in Britain the Queen is respondent in every case. "Why not she can be made respondent in a case in Pakistan," he argued in the court.

    In the petition, Mr Jaffry argued that Britain "forcibly and under duress" stole the diamond from Daleep Singh, grandson of Maharaja Ranjeet Singh, and took it to Britain.

    "The diamond became part of the crown of the incumbent Queen Elizabeth-II at the time of her crowning in 1953. Queen Elizabeth has no right on the Koh-i-Noor diamond," he said. The London-trained lawyer said that he has written 786 letters to the Queen and to Pakistani officials before filing the lawsuit.

    "Koh-i-Noor was not legitimately acquired. Grabbing and snatching it was a private, illegal act which is justified by no law or ethics. A wrong is a wrong. It does not become righteous or right by passage of time or even acquiescence," he said in the petition.

    Claiming that the diamond was cultural heritage of Punjab province and its citizens owned it in fact, he sought direction to the government to bring the diamond back to Pakistan from the UK.

    The Koh-i-Noor is one of the Crown Jewels and is now on display in the Tower of London.

    India has made regular requests for the jewel's return, saying the diamond is an integral part of the country's history and culture.

    India says that Koh-i-Noor was illegally acquired and demands that it should be returned along with other treasures looted during colonial rule.

    The Koh-i-Noor was mined in medieval times in the Kollur mine in Andhra Pradesh's Guntur district. The diamond was originally owned by the Kakatiya Dynasty, which had installed it in a temple of a Hindu goddess as her eye.

    Reportedly, in 1849, after the conquest of the Punjab by the British forces, the properties of the Sikh Empire were confiscated.

    The Koh-i-Noor was transferred to the treasury of the British East India Company in Lahore in British India. The properties of the Sikh Empire were taken as war compensations.

    It passed through the hands of various invaders and was finally appropriated by the British in 1850 during the Raj.

    India has been long demanding the return of Koh-i-Noor which was owned by several Maharajas before being seized by the British.

    When Queen Elizabeth II made a state visit to India marking the 50th anniversary of independence in 1997, many Indians in India and Britain demanded the return of the diamond.

    British Indian lawmaker Keith Vaz had called for the return of 'Koh-i-Noor' diamond to India ahead of Prime Minister Narendra Modi's visit to the UK in November last year.

    Britain has, however, consistently rejected India's claims on the gem and during a visit to India in 2010, British Prime Minister David Cameron had said in an interview on Indian television: "What tends to happen with these questions is that if you say yes to one, then you would suddenly find the British Museum empty.

    Story First Published: February 09, 2016 21:17 IST

  2. #2
    Member greencold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    1,912
    Thanks
    963
    Europe Pakistan

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Well for all India and Pakistan say, nine tenths of ownership is possession and I cant see Brits giving it up any time soon

  3. #3
    Senior Member Mohan Tiwari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    India
    Posts
    2,553
    Thanks
    586
    India India

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Kohinoor was mined andhrapradesh--It was prepared for Goddess Durga in 14th century--
    Invaders looted the diamond. Sikh empire were the last one to possess it
    India knows that UK is not going to hand it back---

  4. #4
    Member xyxmt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    97
    Thanks
    45
    Canada Canada

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    Kohinoor was mined andhrapradesh--It was prepared for Goddess Durga in 14th century--
    Invaders looted the diamond. Sikh empire were the last one to possess it
    India knows that UK is not going to hand it back---
    so what you saying that it should be put back in earth in andhrapradesh?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Mohan Tiwari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    India
    Posts
    2,553
    Thanks
    586
    India India

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by xyxmt View Post
    so what you saying that it should be put back in earth in andhrapradesh?
    Back in the temple where it wad lying for centuries

  6. #6
    Member xyxmt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    97
    Thanks
    45
    Canada Canada

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    Back in the temple where it wad lying for centuries
    Things dont work like that, if it ever made a way back to Subcontinent it will be given back to where they took it from.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Mohan Tiwari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    India
    Posts
    2,553
    Thanks
    586
    India India

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by xyxmt View Post
    Things dont work like that, if it ever made a way back to Subcontinent it will be given back to where they took it from.
    Pakistan is the last country to put claim over this piece of indian diamond.Ownership and inheritance right belongs to place of origin.

    100 of india antiques,statues are stolen and reach west traversing through decades of different owners but once western govt seizes them; they are returned back to the place of origin

    British if ever decides to part with; they ll hand it over to India

  8. #8
    Senior Member sami's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,147
    Thanks
    2361
    Pakistan UK

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Royal Kohinoor: Why Pakistan should enter the debate but won’t



    Lying in the heart of modern Lahore, a city that became the center of colonial and post-colonial history, is the Gora Kabristan or the white graveyard. Gora here is a euphemism for Christian.

    This is the largest Christian graveyard of Lahore and hints at the ethnic diversity that existed in the city since antiquity. This graveyard signifies Christian ethos in the middle of an overwhelmingly traditional Muslim city.

    Angels stand guard over the graves. Some cling to the crosses as if waiting for the messiah. A few heads and some wings have fallen off somewhere during this eternal wait. It is here, in this graveyard that the granddaughter of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, the sovereign of Lahore, the ruler of Punjab, is buried. She is Princess Bamba Sutherland, the eldest daughter of Maharaja Daleep Singh.


    The grave of Princess Bamba Sutherland. —Photo by Alie Imran

    Further down, a regal, three-storey white structure with a magnificent dome on top — the samadh of Ranjit Singh — stands majestically. Next to it, the flag of the Khalsa flutters in the wind representing the Sikh community living there.

    The samadh of Ranjit Singh is surrounded by those of his 11 wives who too were burnt on his funeral pyre — a now bygone practice known as Sati where a woman was burnt with the body of her husband.

    Within the same complex is the splendid samadh of Guru Arjun, the martyred Guru of the Sikhs. Its gold-plated dome rises from a distance to welcome tourists as they head towards the Fort and the Badshahi Masjid in the same vicinity.

    The entrance to the fort faces the samadh of Guru Arjun. This is the hathi darwaza or the Elephant Gate, from whence the King used to enter.


    The samadh of Ranjit Singh with the minaret of the Badshahi Masjid visible in the background. —Photo by Bilal Ejaz

    Moving further down we see the original boundary wall of the fort, decorated with the elaborate frescoes of elephants, kings, princes and princesses. Erected in between the Sikh samadh and the Mughal Fort is a relatively new divider that was constructed by the British.

    The neat little structure serves its purpose, rather sternly, without the aesthetics of either Mughal or Sikh architecture. The wall serves as a symbolic divide between the Mughal history and the Sikh history.

    It separates the history of Lahore into the Muslim era — that of the Mughals — and the Sikh era, beginning with Ranjit Singh and ending with Daleep Singh, the last Sikh ruler of Punjab. You’ve probably heard of the British policy of ‘divide and rule’. So have I.

    Whenever Indians and Pakistanis feel nostalgic, exhausted by constant bickering over the Kashmir issue, Mumbai terror attacks, insurgency in Balochistan; there is one thing that is likely to end the debate — blaming it all on the British for their ‘divide and rule’ policy.

    It is a valid argument, but one that is very misunderstood.

    It is not the nefarious plans of the British that led the Muslims, Hindus and Sikhs to cut each other’s throats, but rather the world view of the Raj. The colonials were obsessed with categorisation and generalisation – their modern day paradigm.

    Communities, religions, history, culture, language, architecture were divided into three stacks; Hindu, Muslim and Sikh. It was the prototype of the thinking patterns we inherited and continue to possess.

    Opposite the Lahore Fort and behind the samadh of Ranjit Singh is the Badshahi Masjid or the Royal Mosque, commissioned by the Mughal King Aurangzeb. Here in its museum is a copy of the Holy Quran written in gold. This copy was part of the Quran collection of Maharaja Ranjit Singh.

    On the other side of the road is the shrine of the patron saint of Lahore, Ali Hujwiri, popularly known as Data Darbar. During Ranjit Singh’s dominion, his wife Jind Kaur, the mother of Daleep Singh, ordered the construction of a Quran gallery, where eventually all copies of the holy book that were owned by the Maharaja, were displayed. Later, they became a part of Lahore Museum’s collections.

    Maharaja Ranjit Singh was the sovereign of Punjab and ruler of all Sikhs, Hindus and Muslims living here. He became ruler only to the Sikhs, posthumously.

    After Daleep Singh signed Punjab over to the British, its history was re-written by the new masters. According to this version, the Muslims — symbolised by the Mughals — killed the Sikh leader, Guru Arjun. The tears that Mian Meer shed on the death of his very close Sikh friend and confidante were erased from record, as it no longer suited the new framework. Ranjit Singh, a Sikh, was projected as the villain desecrating mosques, and the Quran gallery constructed by his wife was hidden under troves of modern history.

    A similar situation faces us today. A group of Indians have sued Queen Elizabeth of England to return the Kohinoor diamond to India, which was taken away from Daleep Singh. This too, is another example of neat categorisation of history — a British present to us.
    How does India today represent that India from where the Kohinoor was taken?

    The Kohinoor belonged to Ranjit Singh whose capital was Lahore, and his empire was predominantly in the area that is now part of Pakistan. Ranjit Singh was born in the Pakistani city of Gujranwala. His last surviving granddaughter, Bamba Sutherland, died a Pakistani.

    Then, how can India solely claim the legacy of Ranjit Singh and his Kohinoor? The India of today is as old as Pakistan; both are the offspring of British-India and both are inheritors of the 'Indian civilisation'.

    This is not to state that the Kohinoor should come to Pakistan because of geographical connections to the diamond’s history.

    Also, it is no secret that Pakistan has repudiated its multi-religious identity for its new national character. We discarded our history and cut off any pre-Islamic, pre-Pakistan ties we had with this land.

    A quick glimpse around the country is enough to see the pitiful state of the gurdwaras and temples. India too can be accused of following a similar pattern. The recent renaming of Aurangzeb road in New Delhi is a clear example of the changing face of history — a trend that we Pakistanis are all too familiar with.

    Another argument could be that Sikhs on both sides of the border truly represent the legacy of Ranjit Singh and hence the Kohinoor. This too is a futile attempt. Ranjit Singh was as much my ruler as he was that of the Sikhs. Muslims generals and ministers were all part of his government. He is a symbol of Punjabi nationalism. He was the first Punjabi king in a thousand years. His legacy is my legacy.

    There is no simple solution to this problem. Neither Indians, nor Pakistanis have sole right to the Kohinoor just as Ranjit Singh was not only a Sikh ruler, but the Maharaja of the entire Punjab, and just as Mian Meer was not only a Muslim saint but also a spiritual leader to the Sikhs, for he had helped lay the foundation of the Golden Temple in Amritsar.

    There is no doubt that Pakistan, too, needs to be included in the debate on Kohinoor’s return, but how can it champion this cause when for years it has denied its own past?

    To be a part of this debate Pakistan would need to accept that its history is not just the history of Muslims in the sub-continent, but of all the people that coexisted here before and with the Muslims.

    Pakistan needs to realise and argue that India is not the sole heir to the Indian heritage and should then enter the debate about the Kohinoor’s return, but perhaps, it won’t.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1219847

  9. #9
    Member Tari's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Posts
    1,392
    Thanks
    1339
    Pakistan Pakistan

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Its not coming back to either Pakistan or India. India has a legit claim but Pakistan? No way.

    Both these countries should stop day dreaming.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Tari For This Useful Post: Enigma


  10. #10
    Member xyxmt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Posts
    97
    Thanks
    45
    Canada Canada

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    Pakistan is the last country to put claim over this piece of indian diamond.Ownership and inheritance right belongs to place of origin.

    100 of india antiques,statues are stolen and reach west traversing through decades of different owners but once western govt seizes them; they are returned back to the place of origin

    British if ever decides to part with; they ll hand it over to India
    ok whatever you say goes
    can you also tell me if i will win the lottery next week?

  11. #11
    Senior Member Pak92's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    3,841
    Thanks
    1636
    Pakistan Pakistan

    Re: Pakistani Court Accepts Plea To Claim Koh-i-Noor From Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by Tari View Post
    Its not coming back to either Pakistan or India. India has a legit claim but Pakistan? No way.

    Both these countries should stop day dreaming.
    Agree it will never be coming back so all should move on

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 4th December 2015, 05:06
  2. Court rejects bail plea of suspected terrorist
    By Fassi in forum Current Affairs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 16th August 2015, 07:20
  3. Court accepts Sharifs’ plea against tax assessment
    By Wajid47 in forum Current Affairs
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 4th August 2015, 07:06
  4. Replies: 17
    Last Post: 17th May 2015, 17:05
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 8th November 2012, 07:54

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Join us on twitter Follow us on twitter