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Thread: Pakistanís Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

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    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Pakistanís Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

    RESIDENT ASHRAF GHANI of Afghanistan has warned in several recent interviews that unless peace talks with Pakistan and the Taliban produce results in the next few months, his country may not survive 2016. Afghanistan is barely standing, he says, after the Taliban onslaught last year, which led to the highest casualties among civilians and security forces since 2001.

    ďHow much worse will it get?Ē Mr. Ghani asked in a recent television interview. ďIt depends on how much regional cooperation we can secure, and how much international mediation and pressure can be exerted to create rules of the game between states.Ē

    What he means is it depends on how much international pressure can be brought to bear on Pakistan to cease its aggression.

    Critics of the Afghan leadership say itís not Pakistanís fault that its neighbor is falling apart. They point to the many internal failings of the Afghan government: political divisions, weak institutions, warlords and corruption.

    But experts have found a lot of evidence that Pakistan facilitated the Taliban offensive. The United States and China have been asking Pakistan to persuade the Taliban to make peace, but Afghanistan argues that Islamabad has done nothing to rein in the Taliban, and if anything has encouraged it to raise the stakes in hopes of gaining influence in any power-sharing agreement.

    This behavior is not just an issue for Afghanistan. Pakistan is intervening in a number of foreign conflicts. Its intelligence service has long acted as the manager of international mujahedeen forces, many of them Sunni extremists, and there is even speculation that it may have been involved in the rise of the Islamic State.

    The latest Taliban offensive began in 2014. United States and NATO forces were winding down their operations in Afghanistan and preparing to withdraw when Pakistan decided, after years of prevarication, to clear Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters from their sanctuary in Pakistanís tribal area of North Waziristan.

    The operation was certainly a serious endeavor ó Taliban bases, torture chambers and ammunition dumps were busted, town bazaars were razed and over one million civilians were displaced.

    But the militants were tipped off early, and hundreds escaped, tribesmen and Taliban fighters said. Many fled over the border to Afghanistan, just at the vulnerable moment when Afghanistan was assuming responsibility for its own security. Ninety foreign fighters with their families arrived in Paktika Province that summer, to the alarm of Afghan officials.

    Further along the border in Paktika Province, Taliban fighters occupied abandoned C.I.A. bases and outposts. A legislator from the region warned me that they would use the positions to project attacks deeper into Afghanistan and even up to Kabul. Some of the most devastating suicide bomb attacks occurred in that province in the months that followed.

    Meanwhile, in Pakistan, the Haqqani network, the most potent branch of the Taliban, moved from North Waziristan into the adjacent district of Kurram. From there it continues to enjoy safe haven and conduct its insurgency against American, international and Afghan targets.

    Pakistan regards Afghanistan as its backyard. Determined not to let its archrival, India, gain influence there, and to ensure that Afghanistan remains in the Sunni Islamist camp, Pakistan has used the Taliban selectively, promoting those who further its agenda and cracking down on those who donít. The same goes for Al Qaeda and other foreign fighters.

    Even knowing this, it might come as a surprise that the regionís triumvirate of violent jihad is living openly in Pakistan.

    First, thereís Sirajuddin Haqqani, the leader of the Haqqani network, and second in command of the Taliban. He moves freely around Pakistan, and has even visited the Pakistani intelligence headquarters of the Afghan campaign in Rawalpindi.

    Then there is the new leader of the Taliban, Mullah Akhtar Muhammad Mansour, who has openly assembled meetings of his military and leadership council near the Pakistani town of Quetta. Since he came to power last year, the Taliban has mounted some of its most ambitious offensives into Afghanistan, overrunning the northern town of Kunduz, and pushing to seize control of the opium-rich province of Helmand.

    Finally, Al Qaedaís leader, Ayman al-Zawahri, enjoys sanctuary in Pakistan ó one recent report placed him in the southwestern corner of Baluchistan. He has been working to establish training camps in southern Afghanistan. In October, it took United States Special Operations forces several days of fighting and airstrikes to clear those camps. American commanders say the group they were fighting was Al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent, a new franchise announced by Mr. Zawahri that has claimed responsibility for the killings of bloggers and activists in Karachi and Bangladesh, among other attacks.

    Pakistan denies harboring the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and points out that it, too, is a victim of terrorism. But many analysts have detailed how the military has nurtured Islamist militant groups as an instrument to suppress nationalist movements, in particular among the Pashtun minority, at home and abroad.

    Perhaps most troubling, there are reports that Pakistan had a role in the rise of the Islamic State.

    Ahead of Pakistanís 2014 operation in North Waziristan, scores, even hundreds, of foreign fighters left the tribal areas to fight against President Bashar al-Assad in Syria. Tribesmen and Taliban members from the area say fighters traveled to Quetta, and then flew to Qatar. There they received new passports and passage to Turkey, from where they could cross into Syria. Others traveled overland along well-worn smuggling routes from Pakistan through Iran and Iraq.

    The fighters arrived just in time to boost the sweeping offensive by ISIS into Iraq and the creation of the Islamic State in the summer of 2014.

    If these accounts are correct, Pakistan was cooperating with Qatar, and perhaps others, to move international Sunni jihadists (including 300 Pakistanis) from Pakistanís tribal areas, where they were no longer needed, to new battlefields in Syria. It is just another reminder of Pakistanís central involvement in creating and managing violent jihadist groups, one Pakistani politician, who spoke on the condition of anonymity when talking about intelligence affairs, told me.

    This has been going on for more than 30 years. In 1990, I shared a bus ride with young Chinese Uighurs, Muslims from Chinaís restive northwest, who had spent months training in Pakistani madrasas, including a brief foray into Afghanistan to get a taste of battle. They were returning home, furnished with brand-new Pakistani passports, a gift of citizenship often offered to those who join the jihad.

    Years later, just after Osama bin Laden was found and killed in Pakistan, I interviewed a guerrilla commander from the disputed region of Kashmir who had spent 15 years on the Pakistani military payroll, traveling to train and assist insurgents in Bosnia, Chechnya, Kashmir and Afghanistan.

    In 2012 I came across several cases where young clerics, fresh graduates from the Haqqania madrasa in Pakistan, returned to their home villages in Afghanistan, flush with cash, and set about running mosques and recruiting and organizing a band of Taliban followers.

    I visited that madrasa in 2013. It is the alma mater of the Afghan Taliban, where many of the leaders of the movement were trained. The clerics there remained adamant in their support for the Taliban. ďIt is a political fact that one day the Taliban will take power,Ē Syed Yousuf Shah, the madrasa spokesman, told me. ďWe are experts on the Taliban,Ē he said, and a majority of the Afghan people ďstill support them.Ē

    The madrasa, a longtime instrument of Pakistani intelligence, has been training people from the ethnic minorities of northern Afghanistan alongside its standard clientele of Pashtuns. The aim is still to win control of northern Afghanistan through these young graduates. From there they have their eyes on Central Asia and western China. Pakistani clerics are educating and radicalizing Chinese Uighurs as well, along with Central Asians from the former Soviet republics.

    No one has held Pakistan to account for this behavior. Why would Pakistan give it up now?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/07/op...ihad.html?_r=1

  2. #2
    Facebook Editor safriz's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistanís Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

    Quote Originally Posted by Sinan View Post
    RESIDENT ASHRAF GHANI of Afghanistan has warned in several recent interviews that unless peace talks with Pakistan and the Taliban produce results in the next few months, his country may not survive 2016. Afghanistan is barely standing, he says, after the Taliban onslaught last year, which led to the highest casualties among civilians and security forces since 2001.

    “How much worse will it get?” Mr. Ghani asked in a recent television interview. “It depends on how much regional cooperation we can secure, and how much international mediation and pressure can be exerted to create rules of the game between states.”

    What he means is it depends on how much international pressure can be brought to bear on Pakistan to cease its aggression.

    Critics of the Afghan leadership say it’s not Pakistan’s fault that its neighbor is falling apart. They point to the many internal failings of the Afghan government: political divisions, weak institutions, warlords and corruption.

    But experts have found a lot of evidence that Pakistan facilitated the Taliban offensive. The United States and China have been asking Pakistan to persuade the Taliban to make peace, but Afghanistan argues that Islamabad has done nothing to rein in the Taliban, and if anything has encouraged it to raise the stakes in hopes of gaining influence in any power-sharing agreement.

    This behavior is not just an issue for Afghanistan. Pakistan is intervening in a number of foreign conflicts. Its intelligence service has long acted as the manager of international mujahedeen forces, many of them Sunni extremists, and there is even speculation that it may have been involved in the rise of the Islamic State.

    The latest Taliban offensive began in 2014. United States and NATO forces were winding down their operations in Afghanistan and preparing to withdraw when Pakistan decided, after years of prevarication, to clear Taliban and Al Qaeda fighters from their sanctuary in Pakistan’s tribal area of North Waziristan.

    The operation was certainly a serious endeavor — Taliban bases, torture chambers and ammunition dumps were busted, town bazaars were razed and over one million civilians were displaced.

    But the militants were tipped off early, and hundreds escaped, tribesmen and Taliban fighters said. Many fled over the border to Afghanistan, just at the vulnerable moment when Afghanistan was assuming responsibility for its own security. Ninety foreign fighters with their families arrived in Paktika Province that summer, to the alarm of Afghan officials.

    Further along the border in Paktika Province, Taliban fighters occupied abandoned C.I.A. bases and outposts. A legislator from the region warned me that they would use the positions to project attacks deeper into Afghanistan and even up to Kabul. Some of the most devastating suicide bomb attacks occurred in that province in the months that followed.

    Meanwhile, in Pakistan, the Haqqani network, the most potent branch of the Taliban, moved from North Waziristan into the adjacent district of Kurram. From there it continues to enjoy safe haven and conduct its insurgency against American, international and Afghan targets.

    Pakistan regards Afghanistan as its backyard. Determined not to let its archrival, India, gain influence there, and to ensure that Afghanistan remains in the Sunni Islamist camp, Pakistan has used the Taliban selectively, promoting those who further its agenda and cracking down on those who don’t. The same goes for Al Qaeda and other foreign fighters.

    Even knowing this, it might come as a surprise that the region’s triumvirate of violent jihad is living openly in Pakistan.

    First, there’s Sirajuddin Haqqani, the leader of the Haqqani network, and second in command of the Taliban. He moves freely around Pakistan, and has even visited the Pakistani intelligence headquarters of the Afghan campaign in Rawalpindi.

    Then there is the new leader of the Taliban, Mullah Akhtar Muhammad Mansour, who has openly assembled meetings of his military and leadership council near the Pakistani town of Quetta. Since he came to power last year, the Taliban has mounted some of its most ambitious offensives into Afghanistan, overrunning the northern town of Kunduz, and pushing to seize control of the opium-rich province of Helmand.

    Finally, Al Qaeda’s leader, Ayman al-Zawahri, enjoys sanctuary in Pakistan — one recent report placed him in the southwestern corner of Baluchistan. He has been working to establish training camps in southern Afghanistan. In October, it took United States Special Operations forces several days of fighting and airstrikes to clear those camps. American commanders say the group they were fighting was Al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent, a new franchise announced by Mr. Zawahri that has claimed responsibility for the killings of bloggers and activists in Karachi and Bangladesh, among other attacks.

    Pakistan denies harboring the Taliban and Al Qaeda, and points out that it, too, is a victim of terrorism. But many analysts have detailed how the military has nurtured Islamist militant groups as an instrument to suppress nationalist movements, in particular among the Pashtun minority, at home and abroad.

    Perhaps most troubling, there are reports that Pakistan had a role in the rise of the Islamic State.

    Ahead of Pakistan’s 2014 operation in North Waziristan, scores, even hundreds, of foreign fighters left the tribal areas to fight against President Bashar al-Assad in Syria. Tribesmen and Taliban members from the area say fighters traveled to Quetta, and then flew to Qatar. There they received new passports and passage to Turkey, from where they could cross into Syria. Others traveled overland along well-worn smuggling routes from Pakistan through Iran and Iraq.

    The fighters arrived just in time to boost the sweeping offensive by ISIS into Iraq and the creation of the Islamic State in the summer of 2014.

    If these accounts are correct, Pakistan was cooperating with Qatar, and perhaps others, to move international Sunni jihadists (including 300 Pakistanis) from Pakistan’s tribal areas, where they were no longer needed, to new battlefields in Syria. It is just another reminder of Pakistan’s central involvement in creating and managing violent jihadist groups, one Pakistani politician, who spoke on the condition of anonymity when talking about intelligence affairs, told me.

    This has been going on for more than 30 years. In 1990, I shared a bus ride with young Chinese Uighurs, Muslims from China’s restive northwest, who had spent months training in Pakistani madrasas, including a brief foray into Afghanistan to get a taste of battle. They were returning home, furnished with brand-new Pakistani passports, a gift of citizenship often offered to those who join the jihad.

    Years later, just after Osama bin Laden was found and killed in Pakistan, I interviewed a guerrilla commander from the disputed region of Kashmir who had spent 15 years on the Pakistani military payroll, traveling to train and assist insurgents in Bosnia, Chechnya, Kashmir and Afghanistan.

    In 2012 I came across several cases where young clerics, fresh graduates from the Haqqania madrasa in Pakistan, returned to their home villages in Afghanistan, flush with cash, and set about running mosques and recruiting and organizing a band of Taliban followers.

    I visited that madrasa in 2013. It is the alma mater of the Afghan Taliban, where many of the leaders of the movement were trained. The clerics there remained adamant in their support for the Taliban. “It is a political fact that one day the Taliban will take power,” Syed Yousuf Shah, the madrasa spokesman, told me. “We are experts on the Taliban,” he said, and a majority of the Afghan people “still support them.”

    The madrasa, a longtime instrument of Pakistani intelligence, has been training people from the ethnic minorities of northern Afghanistan alongside its standard clientele of Pashtuns. The aim is still to win control of northern Afghanistan through these young graduates. From there they have their eyes on Central Asia and western China. Pakistani clerics are educating and radicalizing Chinese Uighurs as well, along with Central Asians from the former Soviet republics.

    No one has held Pakistan to account for this behavior. Why would Pakistan give it up now?

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/07/op...ihad.html?_r=1
    Ghani himself sucks at politics. He cannot keep his own tribal leaders in control. Failing that he and almost all the so called Afghan government put blame on Pakistan.
    Taliban are pro Pakistan because they grew up as war orphans in Pakistan.. Not because Pakistan created them.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistanís Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

    Carlota Gall at it again.
    Bad time of the month I guess...
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistanís Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

    The likes of these socalled Pak experts such as Christine Fair and Carlota Gall should do themselves a big favor and take a good look at the history, specifically from 1979 till date. What was Afghanistan before the USA and USSR jointly raped her and what is the role of CIA and MI5 in creating the monster called Taleban?

    Pakistan was suffering from fresh sanctions and embargoes when the Soviets invaded Afghanistan in 1979. It was an American senator named Charlie Wilson who personally took interest in this conflict and approached the ISI and Gen Zia to mastermind a plan to defeat the Soviets. CIA and MI5 actively recruited 40.000 muslim criminals from all over the world, built training camps in Pakistan with CIA's money and unleashed them into Afghanistan. The Mujahideen were born.

    It took six bloody years for them to gain control of the guerilla war and finally the shoulder mounted stinger missile was introduced which crippled the Soviets. At the end of 1986 the USaid to Pakistan had surged to a billion. It used to be merely a few millions in 1979. ISI became CIA's major ally, received a lots of funds and training and played a major role in defeating the Soviets. The Soviets were officially defeated in 1987 and started to retreat. The US' objectives were met...hence they let Pakistan and the Mujhahideen rot in Afghanistan and left hastly without retrieving hundreds of thousands of advanced weapons or a rehabilitation program for the 40.000+ mercenaries they had brought into Afghanistan.

    The vacuum left in Afghanistan resulted in a new civil war with Pakistan having little choice then to work with the Mujahideen which gave birth to the Taleban. Pakistan and KSA were the only countries to recognise them and have a diplomatic channel. UAE and Qatar followed much later. Supporting Taleban was a logic and strategic choice because the alternative would have been the India backed Northern Alliance, a minority group in Afghanistan.

    9/11 changed the world politics. The badly hurt ego's of the west wit their powerful intelligence agencies needed some face saving hence they attcked and invaded Afghanistan in 2002. Ironically, once again Pakistan was serving heavy sanctions due to our multiple nuclear detonations in May 1998. Once again Pakistan gained importance and we were made to join the US let WoT at gun point. As a result we alienated the Taleban and Pakistan came under the fall out of this new conflict. US and Nato performed most intense carpet bombings since Vietnam on Tora Bora caves, the key hideout for Al Qaeda which resulted in the radicalisation of FATA as hundreds of thousands fighters fled to the porous Pak-Afghan border. Afghanistan was 'liberated' merely by moving the core elements to Pakistan. They were never eliminated.

    A decade later, the sole super power, the US was still struggling in Afghanistan hence they needed an escape goat to fool the American taxpayer and the world. Almost a trillion dollar wasted in Afghanistan with no progress. The promises made to Pakistan were soon forgotten when the US/Indian puppet Karzai was put in power. He failed to unite Afghanistan and went down in the history books as a mayor of Kabul instead of a PM. The Taleban never trusted Pakistan again for this betrayal. Few yeas ago the US realised that Taleban is not fully under ISI control hence they came up with the idea to split them into 'good taleban and bad taleban'. Washington opened a direct channel with the good taleban in Doha, sidelining Pakistan once again. in the mean time Davis, Osama and Salala incidents occurred causing the Pak-US relations sink to an unprecedented low and Pakistan blocked the NATO transit route to Afghanistan. Hilary Clinton's efforts to replair and cement the bilaterial ties with this front line ally in WoT were nullified by the Obama administration. Drone attacks intensified and Pakistan was once again made an escape goat.

    The new elections in Afghanistan saw a major shift as Ghani and Abdullah took joint control of Afghanistan and India became sidelined resulting in another proxy war by RAW which was acknowledged and documented by the USA under Chuck Hagel.

    Initially we had succes with this new administration and Ghani seemed to cooperate. But he too failed to unite Afghanistan and build stronger institutions or to curb foreign proxies that are there to undermine the peace process. RAW officials had meetings with TTP commanders in Afghanistan and were caught by the Americans unveiling Ghanis double game.

    A failing leader needs a strong enemy, an escape goat hence all the fingers are pointing to Pakistan again.

    For the past four decades Afghanistan had been a prone to foreign proxy wars loosing its national identity. The minorities or the major three ethnic groups are more divided then ever and the Taleban who're seeking an entry into local politics through Pakistan and China are a no go for the sitting government. All this and more is causing a total chaos in Afghanistan and who else is there to benefit most from it than our archrivals and enemies?

    So Miss Carlota Gall can try to convince the world that US has bombed the wrong enemy, she will never be able to completely give a bail out to CIA which is reaponsible for the current mess in the region.

    The Islamic State or Daesh is another plan gone sour by the CIA and the paid agents leave no opportunity wasted to blame it on Pakistan.
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    Last edited by Neo; 7th February 2016 at 03:48.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistanís Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

    Not ISI but CIA is responsible for the rise of international jihad. Keep experimenting with strategy games and keep bombing muslim countries or keep creating monsters like Al Qaeda and Daesh but they won't succeed. Hilary Clnton once said: "You can't keep snakes in your backyard and expect them not to bite". How prophetic these words are if one is to look at the extranvganza of wrong policies and missed opportunities by the Americans in the muslim world which they treat as their backyard.
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  6. #6
    Senior Member Fassi's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistanís Hand in the Rise of International Jihad

    He should address the USA for the mess it has created in Afghanistan. The blame game with Pakistan is getting quite pathetic
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