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Thread: What imperils democracy?

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  1. #41
    Member Enigma's Avatar
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hariz View Post
    Notwithstanding that I just get sickened when I see him. He said something which I cant remember for the life of me which was clearly a lie in the NA and then smirked. Yet he is allowed to get away with it. Sick sick pakistan
    Mate they are all the same. Thats Pakistan for you and politics in Pakistan

  2. #42
    Think Tank Muse's Avatar
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    From one of the clearest thinking Op/Ed writers in Pakistan, and a brave one, I hope you will appreciate what he is pointing to:



    The whispered warning
    By Fahd Husain
    Published: December 5, 2015
    The writer is Executive Director News, Express News.


    What we call the beginning is often the end. And to make an end is to make a beginning. The end is where we start from. — TS Eliot

    And so ends the final round of the local government elections in Pakistan, an achievement in itself whose credit would mostly go to the Supreme Court. Had the judges not browbeaten the provincial governments into holding them, the mega electoral exercise would most certainly have not unfolded.

    Today then is the first day of an era in which the entire democratic superstructure is finally in place in Pakistan. It signifies the end of a period dominated completely by the federal and provincial governments, and the start of a process that should theoretically lead to grass-root empowerment.

    This much is obvious.
    What is slightly less so is the fine print at the bottom, which signals a warning to all and sundry: you are now entering unchartered territory where rising expectations of the electorate can lead to all kinds of unforeseen, unpredictable and perhaps even uncontrollable consequences. Let’s dive right into the fine print.

    The theory of ‘Social Contract’ was an important facet of European political and intellectual discourse from the mid-17th to the 19th centuries. Titans like Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Jean-Jacque Rousseau and Immanuel Kant delved into it in their writings, which in turn became the foundations of the modern political structure prevalent in democratic societies. Simply put, the social contract states that people surrender their natural given rights to the ruler in return for the protection of their rights. In modern terms, this would mean giving the government the right to make laws and the right to enforce these laws, in return for which the government provides us basic rights that allow us to live orderly and fulfilling lives.

    Fine. But how does this lesson in political science connect to the just-completed local government elections?

    The explanation is circular. Today, formally, Pakistan is a complete democracy. From the Union Council to parliament and the Senate, all people holding the power to make decisions have a public mandate to do so. The judiciary is independent and the media unfettered. Every nut and bolt holding the democratic structure in place, is in place. The social contract is drawn up, and signed.

    And now it begins.
    So we the people say to the government: you tax us, so in return give us the services and protections that you have promised. It is a pure and simple give-and-take. If there is a discrepancy between what the government takes, and what it provides in return, this constitutes a classic ‘performance deficit’. This deficit can lead to major social and political upheavals.

    And deficit there is. Protection of life and property? Nope. Provision of education for all children? Nope. A service-oriented police? Nope. Justice and protection against abuse by the State? Nope. Due process and the rule of the law that does not discriminate between the rich and the poor, the mighty and the weak? Nope.


    So Mr Ishaq Dar when you tax me, you are actually robbing me blind. But now it’s not just Mr Dar who will shoulder the burden of this performance deficit; now the mayors, and the chairmen and their deputies too will face the music. The cities, town and villages that we inhabit are a mess; broken infrastructure, imaginary sanitation, poor municipal facilities and a general sense of decay all around us. The villains are obvious: between them, the prime minister, chief minister and the mayor are responsible for making my life and that of my family better, but they are not — at least not in the true sense. What do I mean by that?

    Let’s state the obvious first: on a purely human level, the average Pakistani is far worse off than, say an average Briton. Both, however, pay taxes (or are required to by law). This being the case, is it just the Pakistani citizen’s divine misfortune that he or she has been born in a land that is governed by rulers who are unwilling to keep up their side of the social contract? You as a citizen have transferred your natural born rights to the rulers by giving them a mandate, but in return you will only get a partial delivery of service. Your child may never get the education promised by the Constitution. This deprivation will ensure he will live a disadvantaged life, and will never ever be able to rise to the fullest potential he was born with. Multiply this tragedy to cover the entire population of kids that are out of schools and you have a future that is burdened by a nation that will be a burden on this world. Why? Because one side is not fulfilling its part of the contract.

    So, tomorrow when I see trash lying on the road, I will curse the mayor. Tomorrow when I see little kids begging on intersections, I will curse the chief minister. Tomorrow when I see federal money being spent on bricks and mortar instead of flesh and bones, I will curse the prime minister. I will curse them because they rule me in the name of a social contract that now seems like daylight robbery. I will curse them because they rule me in the name of a Constitution that clearly has limited relevance to my life and that of my children. I will curse them because they rule me in the name of morals and principles rooted in my great religion that reformed a backward society within one generation and transformed it into a global superpower. I will curse them because they cover themselves in religious garbs but keep this society illiterate, backward and archaic. I will curse them for their broken promises, their lies and their betrayal.

    All hail the successful completion of our electoral cycle. In the end, however, lies the beginning. The social contract is fluttering in the wind like a tattered flag — ripped, torn, shredded yet defiant. The PM, CM and Mayor might want to take a break from patting their backs to read through the fine print.

    It is whispering a warning.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Muse For This Useful Post: ArshadK


  3. #43
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    So we have "Change" -- PML=N runs the Pounjab, The PPP runs the "Sinned' and the MQM run KHI, PTI runs KPK, preferably not into the ground, because it comes "second" nationally, and that's not too shabby.

    So what's changed again?? Mr. Fahd Hussain (see above) suggests that one that things have been finalized and every "stake holder" has been satisfied - it's time to deliver or wither -- but wait, when in the history of Pakistan have those who failed to deliver, have ever withered??? Is the past a fairly reliable predictor of the future?

    Ok, so we are all agreed that these people do not know what "delivering" looks like - but then neither do the electorate - and fail, they will, they do not know what succeeding is about, I mean in the sense of the administering of public trust, And that it will fall part, however, the "Establishment" or the "Permanent government" is now set up to ensure that as things have changed, that they will remain essentially the same, and this is the flaw in Mr. Hussain's piece, the game of musical chairs may by all means proceed, Pakistanis are not likely to see much change in context in which they live their lives, in the next five to ten years.
    The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Muse For This Useful Post: ArshadK,Enigma,Sarmad


  4. #44
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    With the admission that "terrorists" were provided medical treatment at Imran Khan's Shaukat Khanum hospital, constructed by donations -- the unwillingness to the PML=N to push this further - Well, it stinks, more than one or two "uniforms" will be looking over their shoulders, but then it's Pakistan, disappointment is just par for the course.

  5. #45
    Senior Member ArshadK's Avatar
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    With the admission that "terrorists" were provided medical treatment at Imran Khan's Shaukat Khanum hospital, constructed by donations -- the unwillingness to the PML=N to push this further - Well, it stinks, more than one or two "uniforms" will be looking over their shoulders, but then it's Pakistan, disappointment is just par for the course.
    Of course he claims that he only found out afterwards. Worrying thing is that things would have been no different had he known about it. After all why did Taliban write and tell him and thank him what did they have to gain. Has any action been taken to prevent this in the future

  6. #46
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    Quote Originally Posted by ArshadK View Post
    Of course he claims that he only found out afterwards. Worrying thing is that things would have been no different had he known about it. After all why did Taliban write and tell him and thank him what did they have to gain. Has any action been taken to prevent this in the future

    It is also interesting that UK, US and Canada have placed neither him or his "charities" under sanctions regime, nor have they instituted a travel ban - this is puzzling indeed, are not all terrorists and their facilitators, "bad" ?

  7. #47
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    Democracy is a fraud. We need Khilafat
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  8. #48
    Senior Member ArshadK's Avatar
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    Re: What imperils democracy?

    Quote Originally Posted by truthseer View Post
    Democracy is a fraud. We need Khilafat
    Great idea. Anymore great ideas?

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