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    ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    http://www.ndtv.com/india-news/isro-...-lateststories

    Sriharikota: The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) today launched its twenty-fifth home-made communications satellite in space using the Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) that uses an Indian made cryogenic engine being tested for the third time.

    The heavyweight Indian rocket weighs 416 tonnes and is nearly 50 meters tall.

    The GSLV rocket is being powered using an Indian made cryogenic engine. Dubbed the 'naughty boy' this rocket has had a patchy record with less than half the flights being successful.

    Speaking to NDTV Kiran Kumar, Chairman, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) had said "GSAT-6 carries one of the largest antennas we have built a 6 meter diameter antenna, the prime purpose is to make sure that communication can happen with smaller and smaller hand held devices whether it is for data, video or voice. The users for this will be the strategic sector as it gives a tremendous opportunity for using very small handheld devices in the remotest places."

    In 2013, India had launched a dedicated communications satellite for the Indian Navy.

    The 2,117 kg Indian-made satellite carries a very special giant antennae which will open up in space like an umbrella. The large antennae will help India's strategic forces to communicate with each other on secure lines using special small hand held devices. A capability most needed in today's modern network centric warfare.
    [MENTION=1244]Muse[/MENTION] [MENTION=126]PoKeMon[/MENTION]




    ===================================

    ASAT weapons/kill vehicle cant bring down GSO satellites.
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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    ISRO is the best example of Indian dreams coming true.

    People will now tell you how LCA, Arjun and Kaveri is fail. Brace yourself.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by PoKeMon View Post
    ISRO is the best example of Indian dreams coming true.

    People will now tell you how LCA, Arjun and Kaveri is fail. Brace yourself.
    1)
    LCA is a very capable now. We will have FOC before March 2016. Salient features of MK1 Tejas
    1. modern design concepts
    2. fly-by-wire Flight Control System
    3. Advanced Digital Cockpit
    4. Multi-Mode Radar
    5. Integrated Digital Avionics System
    6. Flat Rated Engine
    7. short takeoff and landing
    8. excellent flight performance
    9. electronic warfare suite
    10. radar warning receiver and jammer
    11. laser warner
    12. missile approach warner
    13. chaff and flare dispenser
    14. Made in India A2A missile & PGM's almost completed.
    15. Integration of any A2A missile or PGM from Israel or Russia of both (if customer insist)
    16. Quick turnaround time & easy to maintain.
    17. 30m $ very cheap



    2) India have invested less than1 billion $ into Kaveri engine. Chinese have failed engine after investing 15-20 billion $ into R&D.
    1. Kaveri is a decent 80 KN turbofan engine which will be used for long range cruise missiles of range 2000 KM

    2. Basically, 40 KN version of kaveri is being used to power nirbhaya


    3) Arjun MK2 is very much improved. MK1 version relied on 40-50% of imported sub components. Russian parts are very unreliable and have big quality concerns.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    By PTI | 27 Aug, 2015, 09.49PM IST
    ISRO working with NASA to make maiden launch in 2021 - The Economic Times

    SRIHARIKOTA (AP): India and US have set a target of 2021 to put their collaborative earth observation satellite NISAR in orbit, ISRO Chairman A S Kiran Kumar said today.

    Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) was working with National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the US to undertake the launch of NISAR by 2021, he told reporters here after the successful launch of GSAT-6 onboard GSLV-D6.

    "One of the GSLV Mark II will carry NASA's satellite NISAR in 2021. There is a very good chance of commercial requirement. Currently we are working on it," he said.

    NISAR Mission (NASA-ISRO Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Mission) will be a dedicated mission to optimally measure intrinsic changes of the Earth's surface associated with motions of the crust and ice surfaces.

    NASA has been studying concepts for a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) mission to determine Earth change in three disciplines - ecosystems, solid earth and cryospheric sciences.

    In the course of these studies, a partnership with ISRO developed that led to a joint mission with L-band and S-band SAR systems on board.


    ISRO has identified a range of applications of particular relevance to India that the mission will address, including monitoring of agricultural biomass over India, snow and glacier studies in the Himalayas, Indian coastal and near- shore ocean studies, and disaster monitoring and assessment.

    Elaborating about ISRO's future plans, Kumar said, it was working on enhancing capacity of the space agency by utilising both GSLV and PSLV vehicles for its future missions.

    After the successful launch of the first GSLV in January 2014, Kumar said there has been enough demand for both PSLV and GSLV. "GSLV puts satellites in Geostationary orbit. Whereas PSLV is different. But there is huge market even for GSLV. After today's launch we are confident of making successful launches in GSLV," he said.

    He said the ISRO was working on reducing the time frame for its launches.

    According to GSLV-D6/GSAT-6, Mission Director R Umamaheswaran the launch of GSLV-D6 was one of the "shortest campaign" undertaken by ISRO.

    "The preparations for this launch commenced on April 8. This is one of the shortest launch campaigns as of GSLV is concerned and today is 100th day of the campaign. Here the cryogenic stage is assembled in Mahendragiri. With this we are able to reduced duration of the campaigns," he said.


    Kiran Kumar said, "We made a successful launch of GSLV last year... Today's was the second.

    "We do understand the intricacies of such things. But we should do it day after day. PSLV and GSLV are two different categories. There is enough demand for both globally. We have to make successful launches in GSLV as only numbers will demonstrate."

    "We need more capacity. We need to make sure that more and more satellites are put. Our intention is to reduce the time normally taken for making launches. We are continuously looking in improving it," he said.

    Asked about the future launches to be undertaken by ISRO, he said the next launch ASTROSAT is expected by end of September on board PSLV.

    "We are now targeting ASTROSAT which has got a number of science payloads. This is a unique satellite because it has got many observations on a common platform. we are targeting to launch it in last week of September," he said.

    "We are also planning to launch three IRNSS satellites by December 2015, February 2016 and March 2016," he said.

    On status of moon mission Chandrayaan-II, Kumar said ISRO was targeting to launch it by end of 2017 or early 2018.

    "Currently work is in progress. We have got couple of tests coming up in the next few months," he said.


    To a query about the launch of satellites made in the US, Kumar said four satellites would be launched with ASTROSAT.

    "US satellites will be launched with ASTROSAT. Actually, four of them (satellites). It will go next month," he said.

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/48701182.cms
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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    GSAT to bolster Army’s rapid strike capability

    http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/nat...ty/125450.html
    New Delhi, August 27
    GSAT-6, the military satellite launched today, will allow the Army to ramp up the speed and accuracy of its striking capabilities, besides providing a much clearer real-time battlefield picture.

    1. It will allow a connection among all Army regiments for seamless real-time flow of two-way information, data, videos and even transmission of images captured through night-vision cameras.

    In other words, it will connect the last of the soldiers with his commander. A mix of handheld devices and laptops will serve as nodal points. The footprint of the satellite is pan-India, sources say.

    2. Army’s accuracy in undertaking strikes will be enhanced due to seamless integration with attack helicopters and fighter jets of the Indian Air Force.

    3. There will be real-time data and video sharing among tanks on the ground, IAF aircraft in the sky and advancing infantrymen. Commanders on the field and Generals sitting in war-rooms will be seeing the same live pictures as the entire battlefield will be connected seamlessly.

    4. The data will be beamed across laptops using a mix of satellites and radio communication. All this will be done at a very high encryption level so as to prevent snooping.

    5. In August 2013, India launched GSAT-7 (or Rukmini), its first military satellite to keep an eye on the Indian Ocean and Malacca.
    Bengaluru: ISRO's GSLV (geosynchronous launch vehicle) fitted with an indigenous cryogenic engine today successfully put the two tonne-class GSAT-6 satellite (2,117 kg) in a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO), 35,000 km above the sea level.
    Today's GSLV-D6 launch followed the successful launch in January last year of GSLV-D5 with a made-in-India cryogenic upper stage (CUS) engine that put the 1,860-kg GSAT-14 in the orbit. That was ISRO's first success with a locally made CUS after years of struggle to perfect the technology.
    Addressing colleagues at the ISRO spaceport in Sriharikota after the launch, ISRO chief Kiran Kumar said, "It has been proved that the successful launch of GSLV-D5 last year was not a fluke." (with inputs from Shubhadeep Choudhury)
    [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] [MENTION=126]PoKeMon[/MENTION] [MENTION=1244]Muse[/MENTION]

    ===================================

    it makes sense for pakistan to settle kashmir issue now with LOC as border. I dont see Pakistan getting anything more than status quo in a decade or so. It could be worse if India changes its doctorine from status quo to revision.


    The gaps b/w India and Pak are widening. With the maturing indian tech in radar, missiles, BVRAAM, BMD(AAD+PAD) coupled with military satellites;Nuclear submarines, Indian indigenous subs(AIP) tech will accelerate indian military capability in coming decade.
    I dont see any use for Pakistan to engage in arms race with India. .
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    Last edited by Mohan Tiwari; 28th August 2015 at 16:19.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    The technological achievement is impressive and praise worthy - I had asked you early whether you thought Pakistani readers had a clue as to the real implications of the Indian space program and it's achievements - be rest assured that they do not - they are more interested in whatever charity comes their way - it's just where they are.

    Now does this technological achievement know Pakistan out of it's claims on Captive Kashmir - it might, but reasonable observers of the scene will point out that Pakistan's security forces have a not allowed themselves to remain innocent of the meaning of events and have sought remedies, even if they do not match the technological achievement of India -- So make a deal on Captive Kashmir, yes this is advice the Indian should take to heart, but to be honest that ship has sailed, and it's cruise I expect will last some time.
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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...ref=sliderNews
    First orbit raising operation of GSAT-6 successfully completed

    First orbit raising operation of GSAT-6 was successfully completed by firing the Apogee Motor for 3385 seconds at 08:35 hrs IST on August 28,” ISRO said.

    Realised orbit is 8,408 km (perigee height) by 35,708 km (apogee height) with an inclination of 7.5 degree and an orbital period of 13 hours, 15 minutes and 24 sec, it said.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Need to Harness the Strategic Potential of GAGAN



    GAGAN, an acronym for GPS-Aided Geo-Augmented Navigation or GPS And Geo-Augmented Navigation system is a satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) meant to support and smoothen civilian air traffic over the Indian skies and adjoining region and was launched on 13 July 2015 by the Civil Aviation Minister. The basic objective of GAGAN, meaning ‘sky’ in the classical language of Sanskrit, is to operate a certified SBAS for navigation services for the safety of the applications with required accuracy and integrity and to provide better air traffic management over the Indian air space.

    The implementation of GAGAN, a joint project of the state-owned Airports Authority of India (AAI) and Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), was indeed a challenging proposition in the context of the severe ionospheric variations in the region of its coverage. Significantly, GAGAN is claimed to be the first SBAS in the world certified for approach with vertical guidance operating in the equatorial ionosphere region. India is claimed to be only the fourth country in the world after USA, Japan and Europe, to develop and deploy a satellite-based augmentation system. The entire ground support infrastructure of GAGAN is now fully operational. To begin with, the efficacy of the GAGAN will be tried on smaller, general aviation aircraft.

    Not unexpectedly, it would take some time before bigger Boeing and Airbus aircraft are equipped with GAGAN receivers. According to sources in ISRO, with GAGAN receivers in place, pilots of aircraft will have on their fingertips reliable and continuous data on position and height from the ground and time. As envisaged now, GAGAN will provide augmentation services covering the Indian flight information region that extends from the entire Indian landmass and Bay of Bengal to South East Asia and expanding up to the African continent. According to official sources, “in the aviation field, GAGAN will support more direct air routes, reduce fuel consumption and improve safety”. Apart from this significant cost savings due to reduction in ground-support staff and reduced work load for flight crew will also accrue. GAGAN described as “eye in the sky” technology could also lead to doing away with a huge, costly and complicated ground network system. Significantly, the benefits of the Rs.7740.00 million GAGAN is not confined just to the civil aviation sector.

    The potentials of GAGAN could be harnessed to support farming, transportation, defence services, homeland security operations, disaster mitigation as well as search and rescue operations. Indeed, as pointed out by R.N.Choubey, Secretary, Ministry of Civil Aviation, the system would be made available to the countries in the SAARC region. He also revealed that the guided approach landing with the help of GAGAN would immediately benefit nearly 50 airports in the country.

    However, in the immediate future, GAGAN will cater to the needs of India’s rapidly expanding air traffic requirements by providing improved accuracy and integrity necessary to enable users to rely on GPS at all the phases of flight from en route through to approach for all airports within the coverage area of GAGAN. As envisaged now, GAGAN will help bridge the gap between European EGNOS (European Geostationary Overlay System) and Japanese MSAS (Multifunctional Satellite Augmentation System) systems to offer seamless navigation services to the civilian aircraft flights over the Indian airspace and its adjoining areas. From the perspective of ushering in “Clean Sky”, GAGAN would reduce noise pollution foot print of the civil aviation traffic.

    According to AAI, the most striking benefit of GAGAN is that it would help reduce the fuel consumption by 20% by allowing the aircraft cruise higher and faster and by charting straight routes by circumventing the zig-zag ones. Right at the moment, fuel accounts for a major part of the cost of the operation of an aircraft. Against this backdrop, the access to GAGAN would help an airline reduces its fuel consumption while increasing its operational efficiency. Through its vastly superior position information, GAGAN permits an easy and smooth access to airports even under hostile atmospheric and climatic conditions. In addition, GAGAN can contribute to enhanced reliability besides helping cut down on delays in flight.

    GAGAN could also prove beneficial to air passengers by defining more accurate terminal area procedures that features parallel routes and optimised airspace corridors. At the end of the day, there is no denying the fact that GAGAN will make Indian skies safer and secure for the aircraft. In particular, GAGAN will make the utilisation of Indian air space more efficient and safer especially above seas, hilly terrain and remote areas. The Indian defence establishment has also expressed its interest to exploit the navigation potentials of GAGAN system for a variety of end uses including search and rescue, reconnaissance and weapons delivery. Much the same as the civilian aircraft are being navigated by GPS, combat and military transport aircraft and helicopters could be guided through a satellite navigation system to land and take off and also hit targets with deadly effect.

    What’s more, GAGAN potentials can be utilised by the Indian defence forces for the launch of high-precision weapons systems including long range missiles with a high degree of accuracy. A synergistic exploitation of the potentials of GAGAN and Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System (IRNSS) being operated by ISRO could prove a win-win development for the Indian defence forces. It makes strategic sense for the Indian military establishment to rely on more than one-satellite based navigation system. For, during the moments of emergency, a second, standby system would come in handy for the defence forces to sustain and support their operations. Under an agreement that India had signed with Russia, the Indian defence forces would be allowed access to the capability of Russian navigation satellite system Glonass for strategic purposes.

    The space segment of GAGAN is composed of three satellites equipped with navigation payloads and located in geostationary orbit. Of the three satellites, two –GSAT-8 and GSAT-10—covering whole of the Indian Flight Information Region and beyond are fully operational. The third satellite with a two channel GAGAN payload, GSAT-15, is planned to be launched by means of an Ariane-5 vehicle of the European space transportation company in October 2015. For the Indian defence forces, the home-grown IRNSS, a seven-satellite GPS constellation, will be a major force multiplier. Four IRNSS satellites are already in operation with the remaining three spacecraft expected to join the constellation in a year’s time.

    IRNSS is a regional navigation satellite system independent of American GPS, Russian Glonass and European Galileo. The strategic advantage of operating an indigenous GPS system hardly needs to be emphasized especially during the hours of crisis. The IRNSS will have both civilian and military applications. There is no denying the point that IRNSS could very well serve as an invaluable component of network-centric warfare. As it is, for long the Indian defence forces did feel thoroughly disadvantaged by the non-availability of accurate signals from GPS system on a sustained uninterrupted basis.

    For instance, during India’s 1999 Kargil conflict with Pakistan, Indian patrols operating in the rugged and difficult to negotiate terrain along the Line of Control (LOC) initially strayed into enemy territory with disastrous consequences. However, the subsequent availability of hand held GPS receivers proved to be invaluable for the special task forces and crack teams engaged in identifying and destroying enemy installations. Indeed, the Indian defence establishment has learnt the hard way that inputs provided by the GPS satellites could be exploited to coordinate the movement of troops and supply with a high degree of efficiency. To stay at the winning edge of the battle field, Indian defence forces should devise a strategy for the optimal utilization of the potentials of both GAGAN and IRNSS. The author is a freelance writer on subjects related to national security and aerospace. Views expressed are personal.

    [MENTION=1244]Muse[/MENTION]

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    Need to Harness the Strategic Potential of GAGAN



    Arbis, you know they will love this stuff and pay for it too.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    Arbis, you know they will love this stuff and pay for it too.
    India signed some confidential document with UAE PM. UAE is paying 1 billion $ for two french military satellites.
    http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/...france-020651/

    The United Arab Emirates’ AED 3.4 billion (EUR 703 million/ $925 million) “Falcon Eye” optical observation satellites are meant to provide a wholly new capability to their military by 2018, and represented the most advanced optics France had ever sold to another country. France’s CNES cites 0.7m / 2′ 4″ spatial resolution for the Pleiades Class at nadir, and a field of view of 20 km. EADS DS/ Astrium touts up to 100 km x 100 km in strip mapping mode.

    The deal has had a rough road lately, and is currently hung up in re-negotiations
    Rofl. They pay 1 billion $ for these 2 pieces.. India could have given them better deal!


    Range of GAGAN(GPS-aided geo-augmented navigation) is approx 2000 Km(+/- horizontal and vertical) from India. It covers entire middle east




    while IRNSS also covers Middle east

    The other 3 SBAS systems(American, European and Japanese cover other parts of world)


    GAGAN/INRSS is certainly being offered to arab states if Arabs have signed the strategic partnership with India. Hopefully Iran shouldnt come to know!






    India would become the fourth country in the world to adopt this system.
    China has some Satellite Navigation Augmentation System (SNAS), Pakistan can use their services.
    National Institute for Aeronautics and Space (LAPAN) of Indonesia has expressed interest in Gagan.
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    Last edited by Mohan Tiwari; 30th August 2015 at 02:10.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    India’s Armed Drone Fleet
    Progress in weaponizing drones is in step with the country’s more robust defense doctrine.

    By Saurav Jha
    June 25, 2015

    http://thediplomat.com/2015/06/india...d-drone-fleet/


    With even Pakistan now sporting an armed unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed with Chinese assistance, India has decided to accelerate the development of its own weaponized drone fleet. The process of weaponizing an indigenously developed UAV has commenced and the elements required to operate an armed drone fleet, such as a high accuracy satellite-based augmentation system (SBAS) and dedicated military communication satellites, are being put in place. Work is also underway on a stealthy unmanned combat aerial vehicle (UCAV).

    Despite this, India still has to make some progress on the collision avoidance technology needed to give its drones the flexibility to use civilian airspace. It will also need to increase satellite bandwidth considerably to increase the tempo of armed UAV flights. In the next few years limited use of drone strikes near India’s borders on terrorist targets may be on the table, in keeping with the emerging Modi-Doval doctrine that authorized the recent cross-border strike in Myanmar.

    Status

    While the Indian military has long operated Israeli Searcher and Heron drones for C4ISTAR roles and even possesses anti-radiation suicide drones from the same source, it does not as yet have missile firing drones such as the Predator its inventory. India is now looking to change that with its Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO) beginning serious work on weaponizing the indigenously developed Rustom-I Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) UAV.

    According to the DRDO, it has integrated a locally developed anti-tank missile called the HELINA with the Rustom-I. Taxi trials have been completed, with flight trials expected to commence this year. The idea is to have the weaponized configuration of the Rustom-I ready by the middle of next year. This sudden urgency is perhaps in no small measure due to the recent test-firing of a laser guided missile by Pakistan’s Burraq drone, which was developed with Chinese assistance and which resembles the CASC CH-3 drone.

    While integration with missiles such as the HELINA also indicate a potential anti-armor role for the Rustom-I, it could certainly be used in strikes on remote terrorist camps or for that matter on small vessels on the high seas. Indeed, the first military user of the Rustom-I is likely to be the Indian Navy rather than the Indian Army, which still wants certain features added to the Rustom-I before it agrees to induct it.

    A key enabler for armed UAV flights in India would be the new domestically developed SBAS called GAGAN, which has already received certification for both en-route navigation as well as precision vertical guidance for assisting planes to land safely and beamed its first signals earlier this year. While GAGAN was designed to assist civil aviation in India, the enhancement of satellite navigation (SATNAV) signals that it provides is obviously available to Indian military users as well. Indeed, Indian defense scientists along with local industry have also developed a lightweight GAGAN receiver module that can be fitted aboard UAVs and is capable of receiving “refined” signals from the American GPS, Russian GLONASS, and Indian Regional Navigation Satellite System which will become fully operational in the near future.

    GAGAN is crucial for waypoint navigation of Indian UAVs and will assist them to both “get back home” in the event of a link failure with their ground control stations (GCS) as well as make emergency landings on alternate airfields. Both of these aspects naturally assume even greater importance when a UAV carries on board weapons. Of course, the availability of high quality SATNAV signals are also very important for precision strike purposes.

    Indian armed drones in the future will also be able to operate over extended ranges as the Indian military inducts more dedicated military communication satellites. Again, the Indian Navy is a front runner in this department having fully integrated the GSAT-7 communication satellite in its order of battle and used it to network ships and aircrafts in missile firing exercises. GSAT-7 can also relay signals in the Ku-band and this can be used to control Indian UAVs, which will feature a Ku-band transmitter data link. The Indian Air force and Army are meanwhile looking forward to their own joint military communication satellite called GSAT-7A, which will also have Ku-band transponders.

    In some ways the stage is being set for the indigenous UCAV program that is currently focused on developing a sufficiently stealthy platform, release of weapons from an internal weapons bay, and materials for all-aspect stealth. The first flight of this UCAV is expected to take place in the early 2020s. By that time, the support elements required to exploit such a system are likely to have matured in India.

    Challenges

    GAGAN notwithstanding, Indian armed UAV operations will remain restricted to military airspace until such time that India makes progress on a collision avoidance system. For this technology, India is currently tapping the U.S. and France, but it remains to be seen how much assistance will be forthcoming in this arena. Without a collision avoidance system, India’s Directorate General of Civil Aviation will obviously not conclude an agreement with the military to allow UAVs to transit civil airspace. Moreover until the Indian military can put up a large enough constellation of military communication satellites, armed drone operations will be somewhat limited in scope and tempo. There will be a reliance on short distance VHF links unless greater satellite bandwidth is made available. This means that Indian armed UAV operations will take place close to Indian airspace in the early years of deployment. It will also limit basing options for Indian armed drones.

    In any case, the Rustom-I is not a long-range system and it is perhaps the Rustom-II, still under development and expected to be able to fly for up to 30 hours at a stretch, which will assume the mantle of India’s frontline armed drone in the years ahead. Development of the Rustom-II has been delayed on account of challenges with efficient design as well as the cancellation of export licenses by the U.S. State Department of the American origin actuators that were being used in the Rustom-II. India has now had to develop indigenous replacements for those actuators and the Rustom-II will fly with those this year.

    The episode may, however, have catalyzed India’s ongoing bid to join the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) and the Wassenaar Arrangement, both of which seek to restrict the flow of dual-use items that go into UAV development. India had voluntarily chosen to synchronize its export-control regimes with the MTCR in 2008 during the heyday of the Indo-U.S. nuclear civil agreement and is now looking to use its excellent non-proliferation record to ensure that such events do not get in the way of its UAV development programs by formally joining that association.

    Doctrine

    Indeed, unlike China, India’s armed UAV fleet will essentially be for its own use and not meant for the export market, something that is being signaled via its bid to join the MTCR. Armed drones for India are actually both a symmetric response to what the Chinese and Pakistanis have been doing in this arena as well as a response to asymmetric tactics being used by India’s rivals. Armed drones are intended to expand the response options available to the Indian military as it has to mount more operations to neutralize terrorist elements based out of remote facilities in neighboring countries.

    The employment of armed drones for precision strikes will make it easier for the Indian military to neutralize targets of opportunity in scenarios where sending in special forces would be too risky or complicated. Once lightweight UAV specific munitions that minimize collateral damage become available, armed drones could also potentially prosecute targets co-located with civilian hamlets. Overall, the pursuit of armed drones is in consonance with the Modi-Doval doctrine which seeks to position India as a state that is not averse to deploying hard power for national security requirements.


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    [MENTION=1244]Muse[/MENTION]

    There is big diff b/w India and pakisani policy makers. India first build the necessary infrastructure(IRNSS, SBAS(GAGAN) while pak procures ready made export version of chinese equipments.

    Both countries have different objective. For short term pakistan will be able to contain arms gap viz a viz with India. But post 2020, India throttle will in accelerator mode!
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    Last edited by Mohan Tiwari; 30th August 2015 at 02:01.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    India’s Armed Drone Fleet
    Progress in weaponizing drones is in step with the country’s more robust defense doctrine.

    By Saurav Jha
    June 25, 2015

    http://thediplomat.com/2015/06/india...d-drone-fleet/


    With even Pakistan now sporting an armed unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) developed with Chinese assistance, India has decided to accelerate the development of its own weaponized drone fleet.

    There is big diff b/w India and pakisani policy makers. India first build the necessary infrastructure(IRNSS, SBAS(GAGAN) while pak procures ready made export version of chinese equipments.

    Both countries have different objective. For short term pakistan will be able to contain arms gap viz a viz with India. But post 2020, India throttle will in accelerator mode!
    You know Mr. Tiwari, I do to take you seriously -- And you cite important element of Chinese assistance, as if it were somehow, not cricket, so to speak, and yet employ different rules of cricket to assistance Indian scientists and engineers receive from Russians, European and Americans ---- Now, don't get wrong, you can play by those rules, just as long as you understand, that applying one set of rules to India and another set to children of a lesser god, such as Pakistan, is a hypocrisy unworthy, but then again, hypocrisy is a complement vice pays to virtue.

    You also cite different objectives -- see above.

    You may a point that Pakistani readers should take greater interest in when you suggest that India first build a vast infrastructure, then accelerate -- in every related post I argue for specialized schools over weapons systems, so I take your point and concur - on the other hand, Pakistani planners cannot forever cry over spilled milk, they must make do with what their apathetic approach towards politics and the economy allow them do.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    You know Mr. Tiwari, I do to take you seriously -- And you cite important element of Chinese assistance, as if it were somehow, not cricket, so to speak, and yet employ different rules of cricket to assistance Indian scientists and engineers receive from Russians, European and Americans ---- Now, don't get wrong, you can play by those rules, just as long as you understand, that applying one set of rules to India and another set to children of a lesser god, such as Pakistan, is a hypocrisy unworthy, but then again, hypocrisy is a complement vice pays to virtue.

    You also cite different objectives -- see above.

    You may a point that Pakistani readers should take greater interest in when you suggest that India first build a vast infrastructure, then accelerate -- in every related post I argue for specialized schools over weapons systems, so I take your point and concur - on the other hand, Pakistani planners cannot forever cry over spilled milk, they must make do with what their apathetic approach towards politics and the economy allow them do.

    There is no denying about assistance India receives from western countries. But there is well defined R&D infrastructure, plan/intent, funding & differential skills sets in varying technical domains.

    Say for e.g Gagan was not possible without critical component from Raytheon who build the ground stations for the GPS-Aided Geosynchronous Augmented Navigation System. ISRO provides the space segment and additional ground equipment.

    But India built its rocket, satellites & have most of indigenous component needed for the development of such systems.


    You have already covered the second point in detail. Both countries have different strategic objectives. Pakistan came up with Babur cruise missiles 9 years before India tested Nirbhaya(1000KM range)

    India spent those many years to build the ecosystem. But it has come up with in house turbofan engine which can be easily modified to propel same missiles to 2000 km range.
    First product comes late but TOT for next product will be reduced.
    Since Pakistan havent invested any resources on turbofan R&D. It will probably use other means to achieve its goal
    Last edited by Mohan Tiwari; 30th August 2015 at 20:32.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    There is no denying about assistance India receives from western countries. But there is well defined R&D infrastructure, plan/intent, funding & differential skills sets in varying technical domains.

    Say for e.g Gagan was not possible without critical component from Raytheon who build the ground stations for the GPS-Aided Geosynchronous Augmented Navigation System. ISRO provides the space segment and additional ground equipment.

    But India built its rocket, satellites & have most of indigenous component needed for the development of such systems.


    You have already covered the second point in detail. Both countries have different strategic objects. Pakistan came up with Babur cruise missiles 9 years before India's tested Nirbhaya.

    India spent those many years to build the ecosystem. But it has come up with its in house turbofan engine which can be used to propel same missiles to 2000 km range.

    Since Pakistan havent invested any resources on turbofan R&D. It will probably use other means to achieve its goal
    Indeed, the pot Pakistan **** in, is not the size of pot the Indian does -- and therefore it may appear to you that well defined R&D, planning, Infrastructure, intent are notions that are alien to Pakistani engineers and scientists - and of course who can blame you for thinking the way you do -- much like others, when you see others you imagine you must see yourself reflected, but I think this just a phase, India will grow out it.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    Indeed, the pot Pakistan **** in, is not the size of pot the Indian does -- and therefore it may appear to you that well defined R&D, planning, Infrastructure, intent are notions that are alien to Pakistani engineers and scientists - and of course who can blame you for thinking the way you do -- much like others, when you see others you imagine you must see yourself reflected, but I think this just a phase, India will grow out it.
    Iran & Pak economic size are similar. Both spend more or less same on defence. Iran spends much more on R&D than Pakistan.
    NESCOM builds missiles for pakistan. It says to be an organisation of 15000 people. Where is the official website? No info about R&D labs available on internet. What are the various types of research it's undertaking. How much is the funding given to it.

    you could hide the name of critical projects but there is no harm in being more accountable while sharing trivial information to public.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    Iran & Pak economic size are similar. Both spend more or less same on defence. Iran spends much more on R&D than Pakistan.
    NESCOM builds missiles for pakistan. It says to be an organisation of 15000 people. Where is the official website? No info about R&D labs available on internet. What are the various types of research it's undertaking. How much is the funding given to it.

    you could hide the name of critical projects but there is no harm in being more accountable while sharing trivial information to public
    .
    Obviously Pakistani security planners think otherwise, they appear to care less about prestige and more about security because they are paranoid and like to think that the opaque nature of their security apparatus, which without websites, now and then comes up with enough ideas to keep adversaries "sober".

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    Obviously Pakistani security planners think otherwise, they appear to care less about prestige and more about security because they are paranoid and like to think that the opaque nature of their security apparatus, which without websites, now and then comes up with enough ideas to keep adversaries "sober".

    No research publications to any 1-2 tier journals. If you claim to make solid stage rocket engine then there must be something worth publishing from propulsion, materials department.

    On the contrary, there are many publications proving the origin of your solid & liquid rocket engine

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    No research publications to any 1-2 tier journals. If you claim to make solid stage rocket engine then there must be something worth publishing from propulsion, materials department.

    On the contrary, there are many publications proving the origin of your solid & liquid rocket engine

    Then life is good and Pakistani weapons program should be cause of no serious concern

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    Then life is good and Pakistani weapons program should be cause of no serious concern

    That's probably 1 reason for slow progress of pakistan missile program.

    Shaheen series are at technically par with Indian SLV of 1979 in terms of payload. Pakistan's doesnt even publish specific impulse & thrust of its engines.


    India is not threatened by Pakistan's short term gains in JF17 ,Cruise missiles programs.

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    Re: ISRO's Big Launch: Military Communications Satellite GSAT-6

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohan Tiwari View Post
    That's probably 1 reason for slow progress of pakistan missile program.

    Shaheen series are at technically par with Indian SLV of 1979 in terms of payload. Pakistan's doesnt even publish specific impulse & thrust of its engines.


    India is not threatened by Pakistan's short term gains in JF17 ,Cruise missiles programs.

    I would be delighted to read and hear this, were it not for the sense of denial in your post. My understanding of Pakistan's security planning is that their LONG TERM goal is not to threaten anyone, but rather to deter and punish adventurism. So long as Indians are not pursing an adventurous military policy, they face no threat, and give no cause to deter and punish - And as you point out Pakistani stuff is all Chinese stuff really, and its no competition for India's Russian, and European and US stuff - Indeed, if anybody should feel threatened, it's Pakistan and it's inability to realize it's emotional attachment to policies it, with no help from others, put in jeopardy.

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