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  1. #81
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    Re: Indian economy sees growth momentum, says OECD Read more at: http://economictim

    Quote Originally Posted by manuu View Post
    You are correct there are other factors one should keep in mind when making an objective conclusion. I will stick to my guns and say my money would be invested in countries with a better standard of living and security for my returns. Its just by opinion.
    Quote Originally Posted by Amjad Hussain View Post
    So why are millions of Indians spending their life savings trying to get out of India if its so prosperous?
    India haven't got a bigger market yaar. Please use that brain. India have got 650 million foodless. How can you count them as a "market" for gods sake? They are a hindrance and parasite to your economy.
    We are making significant investments in India: Starbucks’ John Culver

    US-based coffee chain Starbucks Corp. plans to keep investing in India, a market it entered two years ago through a joint venture with the Tata group. It currently runs 59 outlets across six cities. John Culver, group president of Starbucks China and Asia Pacific, and Avani Davda, chief executive officer, Tata Starbucks Ltd, the local arm of the coffee chain, spoke in an interview about the company’s long-term plans for India, traditionally a nation of tea drinkers. Edited excerpts: So, what brings you here? Culver: We are here to celebrate two years in India. Last two years have exceeded our expectations in the response that we have received from the Indian customers. They’ve embraced Starbucks and they are beginning to make it a part of their daily rituals and frequenting our stores on a daily basis. Equally what we have seen is that they are using our store as the third place between their work and their home and they come to our stores with friends and families and use Starbucks as a gathering place. You’ve opened 59 outlets in the past two years. Will you be able to keep up the momentum? Culver: What we have seen over the last two years is this response and this pent-up demand in the market for our brand and for the future we are very optimistic of the market...At the same time we want to be thoughtful about how we build our company here in India that not only has successful stores but that takes care of its partners. We want to continue make investments in them and even in the local community. You recently increased the investment in the market—about Rs350 crore? Where will the funds be deployed? Dawda: We are growing at a good pace and we are committed to this market for the long term, and we are making the right investments, be it creating our stores, be it expansion,creating the right training facilities and having the right structures for our partners. So investment is just one area not just for the business but for partner development—which is a large area of this process. You will get different numbers as we raise the capital, but behind the investment is the philosophy with which we want to run the company. Yes, we will go and make investments but in the right things. So will growth trickle down to smaller markets? Culver: Over time we will look at the thoughtful expansion in the market. I think the six cities that we operate in today, we will continue expanding in those markets, and as we grow our business we will thoughtfully expand in those markets. We’ve got to show up in a way, that gets customers back to our stores, so innovation for that is critical. Since the last few months large coffee chains in India—such as Costa Coffee—have either scaled back operations or changed partners, suggesting that selling coffee in India is still not a profitable business? Your thoughts. Dawda: For Starbucks and Tata, this market is very significant and over a period of time we want to grow. We are in very early stages of setting up our business here and for us the landscape is not about getting to the lamppost out there that we have opened so many stores, although success is defined by the store counts. But for us it’s about being thoughtful, which allows us to grow with financial discipline. With parents like Tata and Starbucks, we have very good direction as to how we want to be in the market. We have elevated the coffee house experience in the market and we have created spaces that people love... We’ve also redefined about how coffee is experienced; we’ve been talking to customers about novel coffee experiences, about how it’s paired with food, etc. For us, profitability will be important as we nurture the market, but we are doing this the right way. Our investments will be about growing our partners, recreating customer experience, bringing in innovations, etc. So by when will Starbucks be profitable in India? Culver: I can’t comment on the financials at all but I can say that we are making significant investments in this country—in our business here in terms of our people and building capability and infrastructure. We are localizing a lot of resources here in the market and we are localizing our sourcing in the market. We feel that the investments that we are making are setting us up for a long-term success. And we think that as a company we’ve been operating for 43 years now, we have 21,000 stores across the globe and I think as we have entered markets and done business in new markets, India, for a new market, has been the fastest growth market we have ever witnessed, and so for us we are going to continue to be thoughtful and make investments and follow what we have done in the past. Within the countries that you look at, where does India fit in? Culver: When we look at India in the long-term perspective, India is one of our newest markets, we see a long-term growth opportunity here. One day it will the top five largest market across the globe. But at the same time we have to realize that we have to be very thoughtful.

    http://www.livemint.com/Companies/pH...tm_source=copy
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  2. #82
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    Re: Indian economy sees growth momentum, says OECD Read more at: http://economictim

    Quote Originally Posted by manuu View Post
    I knew you would say that hence set the trap.
    Please don't be blinded by your biased approach.
    One of our directors of the IT department went to Mumbai and said as he arrived at the hotel he was struck with the horrendous smell of open sewers full of urea and people begging on every street corner. He was physically sick and will never return. Now this isn't an isolated incident bro, its factual.
    does one incident describe the whole india?Everyone knows about the conditions of poors...everyone knows we have poors and beggars but what it has to do with business,are those poors asking their investment money?We are bending toward a manufacturing hub as I have given proof in above articles inspite of that we have 200 million poors(not 650 millions).
    maybe some old IT companies lie near slum but not all,they are alloted in SEZ(special economic zone,for industry only).
    Many states are giving tax exemption like 'no tax for ten years',lands are given at subsidy',etc to companies investing in their state.companies only do care about these thing only,not about 'how many poors are there or no. of beggars'.they don't give a damn about these things.
    You do investment in India...you will be definitely in profit.

    I would suggest India (like Pakistan) have a long way to go so please stop the patriotic blindness.
    ...and please don't compare India with pakistan.India ranks 18th in the 'most desired place to work' list whereas pakistan ranks 7th in 'most worst place for doing job' list.
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    Last edited by Goku; 5th November 2014 at 08:39.

  3. #83
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    Re: Indian economy sees growth momentum, says OECD Read more at: http://economictim

    Quote Originally Posted by Amjad Hussain View Post
    So why are millions of Indians spending their life savings trying to get out of India if its so prosperous?
    India haven't got a bigger market yaar. Please use that brain. India have got 650 million foodless. How can you count them as a "market" for gods sake? They are a hindrance and parasite to your economy.
    To compare yourselves with the likes of Canada or USA just clearly shows us the problem India has. If you are the educated souls coming out of your nation then the future is bleak.
    India has fantastic potential and with hard work could start climbing the economical ladder but please for the love of god, open your eyes and be honest with yourselves.
    Its not 650 million(this is old figure),its 200 million out of 1250 million,perhaps its the big market ....every economist has the same outlook about India's big market....and who are u,are u more qualified than those economist,are u even economist?
    please...do give a scratch to your brain..

  4. #84
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    Re: Indian economy sees growth momentum, says OECD Read more at: http://economictim

    Quote Originally Posted by wolverine View Post
    It's your opinion similarly it's opinion of several countries who are investing in India.
    not 'several' dude!! but 'many'

  5. #85
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    Re: Indian economy sees growth momentum, says OECD Read more at: http://economictim

    Quote Originally Posted by Goku View Post
    Its not 650 million(this is old figure),its 200 million out of 1250 million,perhaps its the big market ....every economist has the same outlook about India's big market....and who are u,are u more qualified than those economist,are u even economist?
    please...do give a scratch to your brain..
    Really? Ok I believe you but many wont.

    The Starving 800 million in India

    The subtitle of Siddhartha Deb’s article, Feast and Famine, in the Boston Review reads, “India Is Growing, But Indians Are Still Starving.” The subtitle is too short. It should have added,”If India had not been growing, a couple of hundred million additional Indians would be starving.” I make this point because the article gives the impression that somehow India’s growth has something to do with the 800 million Indians who have to survive on less than Rs 20 a day.

    The article is a reporter’s piece laying out some of the facts; it is not an analytical piece attempting to make sense of the situation as it exists. While it is mildly informative and makes for strongly depressing reading, it does not help us understand the big picture. Take for instance, ” . . . part of the growing national trend of farmer suicides, with nearly 200,000 farmers killing themselves from 1997 to 2008, in the very years that the Indian economy was expanding.”

    Did you catch that implied hint of causation in the reported correlation? Anyway, just how high is that raw 200,000 number? We just don’t know because the context is missing. India’s raw suicide rate in 1998 was 12.2 for males and 9.1 for females per 100,000 population, or approximately 10.6 people 100,000, per year. With a population of 1 billion, India can expect 106,000 suicides per year. Now we have to ask, “Is the number 18,000 farmer suicides a year unnaturally high if the total number of suicides a year is 106,000?”

    The answer to that question depends on what the population of farmers in the Indian population is. If the population of farmers in the population is, say, 25 percent, then the number of suicides among farmers is actually below the population average.
    The point is that for us to make sense of the suicide numbers, we need to know not the raw numbers but normalized numbers — “farmer suicide rate is 15 per 100,000, as compared to overall rate of 12.2 per 100,000,” for example. Not just that, we need to know the trend. “Farmer suicide has gone up to 15 per 100,000 in 2008, from 12 in 1997.” (These figures are made up and not to be taken literally.)

    The piece by Deb is unfortunately typical of such reporting. Perhaps word limits don’t permit a fuller treatment of the subject by the reporter. But even then, surely one can glean from just looking around that India’s starving hundreds of millions is a symptom of a deeper malaise, and mention that however briefly in the article. Instead the overall impression one gets from the article is that somehow evil multinational corporations are behind all the unimaginable misery and it is a compassionate government which is trying its best to fix the problem.

    It is not my case that MNCs are really benevolent charitable organizations. They are in the business for profit, and can be as ruthless as they are often reported to be. You cannot wish them away, although you could legislatively force them to keep off your property. But that comes at a cost — there are benefits to having MNCs around. The challenge is to control them such that the benefits exceed the costs. Which brings us to the one agency which lies at the crux of the matter — the government.

    We all know those numbers: nearly half of India’s children below five are malnourished; x thousand farmer suicides; 40 percent illiteracy; lack of drinking water; lack of power; overcrowding and slums in cities; . . . the list is long and distressing. India is desperately poor — even compared to many sub-Saharan African states.

    They have a saying in Texas which goes, “if you see a tortoise on top of a 10-foot pole, you sure as heck know that it did not get there by itself.” India’s poverty could not have happened without the active participation of some agency in engineering it. We have to understand that basic fact and internalize it before we can have a hope of fixing it.

    India’s poverty did not happen overnight. It took decades to engineer. When the British left in 1947, India had around 200 million desperately poor people. Six decades later, that number is now 800 million. It could not be because of multinational corporations simply because MNCs and modern globalization are recent phenomena. No, India’s problems have a local genesis — and how can it not be local when India has been pretty much shut off from the rest of the world by its wonderful socialistic autarkic regime thanks to Mr Jawaharlal Nehru and his spawn.

    The unarguable fact is that India cannot afford to have such a large population dependent on agriculture as their primary source of income. Just do the numbers. Basic arithmetic, really. We must do arithmetic. John McCarthy, the Stanford computer scientist guru says, “Those who refuse to do arithmetic are doomed to speak nonsense.” Let’s avoid nonsense.

    India occupies two percent of the world’s land area and has 17 percent of the world’s population. Agriculture requires land. And huge amounts of water. India’s fresh water reserves are pitifully little. Water tables are dropping. India — and Indians — cannot afford to earn a living growing food. Indians have to bring something else to the global table. It cannot be food. It has to be manufactures or even services, but not food.

    Sure India needs food, and food that is produced in India. But there is a limit to food productivity and food production. New Zealand with it single-digit million population can be single-crop economy and prosper. India cannot because India is no New Zealand. India has a population of 1,200 million people.

    India’s agricultural productivity has to increase so that its production goes up and fewer people are in agriculture. Arithmetic again. If 100 percent of the population is engaged in producing food, surely no one can be “rich” because to be rich one has to have something other than food. Who is going to produce that something other if everyone is engaged in producing food? Answer me that!

    The simple fact is that India is poor because too many people are in agriculture. What India has to do is to move out of agriculture and go into manufacturing and services. But then, you have to be educated to be in manufacturing and services. With absolutely low percentages of the population even literate, there is scant chance of being educated.


    Why aren’t Indians educated — even literate? Because the government does not allow education and literacy. Really? Yes, really.
    India has to move to manufacturing and into services. It can be done, and in a short time. it is a matter of policies. But it cannot happen under the current set of rules, which are such that it forces more and more people into desperate poverty. Why do they do that? Because it helps the policymakers — more specifically the Nehruvian socialist types. The policies they make help them personally and impoverish the nation. That’s what needs to change, not the MNCs
    .
    http://www.deeshaa.org/2011/06/02/th...lion-in-india/

    Now you say whatever you want to. This is the worlds perception of India. Like it or not --- there is a mountain to climb and living in denial mode like you are just knocks you back further.
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  6. #86
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    Re: India's economy

    [MENTION=75]Express[/MENTION],I've more reliable source than yours.....Acc. to reuters... it doesn't reflect 800 million at all...

    Thirty-three percent of world’s poorest live in India

    India has 33 percent of the world’s poorest 1.2 billion people, even though the country’s poverty rate is half as high as it was three decades ago, according to a new World Bank report.

    India reduced the number of its poor from 429 million in 1981 to 400 million in 2010, and the extreme poverty rate dropped from 60 percent of the population to 33 percent during the same period. Despite the good news, India accounts for a higher proportion of the world’s poor than it used to. In 1981, it was home to 22 percent of the world’s poorest people.

    The World Bank report comes just days after it proposed a $12 billion to $20 billion plan to reduce poverty levels over four years in the Indian states of Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh. Sixty percent of the financing would go to state government-backed projects, according to the Hindu Business Line newspaper.

    The study that came out today showed a similar decline in the number of people living in poverty in recent years. People living below $1.25 (67 rupees) a day fell considerably from more than half the people in the developing world in 1981 to 21 percent in 2010, despite a 59 percent increase in world population during the same period.

    Still, there are 1.2 billion people living in extreme deprivation, and the World Bank urged the international community to increase efforts to stop this within the next two decades.

    China was the most successful country in helping improve its people’s economic condition. Its poverty rate fell to 12 percent of the population in 2010 from 84 percent in 1981.

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region in the world where the number of poor has risen steadily, despite a decrease in poverty rate from 51 percent in 1981 to 48 percent in 2010, according to the report titled “The State of the Poor: Where are the Poor and Where are the Poorest?”

    (source:http://blogs.reuters.com/india/2013/...live-in-india/)
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  7. #87
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    Re: Indian economy sees growth momentum, says OECD Read more at: http://economictim

    Quote Originally Posted by Express View Post
    Really? Ok I believe you but many wont.

    The Starving 800 million in India

    The subtitle of Siddhartha Deb’s article, Feast and Famine, in the Boston Review reads, “India Is Growing, But Indians Are Still Starving.” The subtitle is too short. It should have added,”If India had not been growing, a couple of hundred million additional Indians would be starving.” I make this point because the article gives the impression that somehow India’s growth has something to do with the 800 million Indians who have to survive on less than Rs 20 a day.

    The article is a reporter’s piece laying out some of the facts; it is not an analytical piece attempting to make sense of the situation as it exists. While it is mildly informative and makes for strongly depressing reading, it does not help us understand the big picture. Take for instance, ” . . . part of the growing national trend of farmer suicides, with nearly 200,000 farmers killing themselves from 1997 to 2008, in the very years that the Indian economy was expanding.”

    Did you catch that implied hint of causation in the reported correlation? Anyway, just how high is that raw 200,000 number? We just don’t know because the context is missing. India’s raw suicide rate in 1998 was 12.2 for males and 9.1 for females per 100,000 population, or approximately 10.6 people 100,000, per year. With a population of 1 billion, India can expect 106,000 suicides per year. Now we have to ask, “Is the number 18,000 farmer suicides a year unnaturally high if the total number of suicides a year is 106,000?”

    The answer to that question depends on what the population of farmers in the Indian population is. If the population of farmers in the population is, say, 25 percent, then the number of suicides among farmers is actually below the population average.
    The point is that for us to make sense of the suicide numbers, we need to know not the raw numbers but normalized numbers — “farmer suicide rate is 15 per 100,000, as compared to overall rate of 12.2 per 100,000,” for example. Not just that, we need to know the trend. “Farmer suicide has gone up to 15 per 100,000 in 2008, from 12 in 1997.” (These figures are made up and not to be taken literally.)

    The piece by Deb is unfortunately typical of such reporting. Perhaps word limits don’t permit a fuller treatment of the subject by the reporter. But even then, surely one can glean from just looking around that India’s starving hundreds of millions is a symptom of a deeper malaise, and mention that however briefly in the article. Instead the overall impression one gets from the article is that somehow evil multinational corporations are behind all the unimaginable misery and it is a compassionate government which is trying its best to fix the problem.

    It is not my case that MNCs are really benevolent charitable organizations. They are in the business for profit, and can be as ruthless as they are often reported to be. You cannot wish them away, although you could legislatively force them to keep off your property. But that comes at a cost — there are benefits to having MNCs around. The challenge is to control them such that the benefits exceed the costs. Which brings us to the one agency which lies at the crux of the matter — the government.

    We all know those numbers: nearly half of India’s children below five are malnourished; x thousand farmer suicides; 40 percent illiteracy; lack of drinking water; lack of power; overcrowding and slums in cities; . . . the list is long and distressing. India is desperately poor — even compared to many sub-Saharan African states.

    They have a saying in Texas which goes, “if you see a tortoise on top of a 10-foot pole, you sure as heck know that it did not get there by itself.” India’s poverty could not have happened without the active participation of some agency in engineering it. We have to understand that basic fact and internalize it before we can have a hope of fixing it.

    India’s poverty did not happen overnight. It took decades to engineer. When the British left in 1947, India had around 200 million desperately poor people. Six decades later, that number is now 800 million. It could not be because of multinational corporations simply because MNCs and modern globalization are recent phenomena. No, India’s problems have a local genesis — and how can it not be local when India has been pretty much shut off from the rest of the world by its wonderful socialistic autarkic regime thanks to Mr Jawaharlal Nehru and his spawn.

    The unarguable fact is that India cannot afford to have such a large population dependent on agriculture as their primary source of income. Just do the numbers. Basic arithmetic, really. We must do arithmetic. John McCarthy, the Stanford computer scientist guru says, “Those who refuse to do arithmetic are doomed to speak nonsense.” Let’s avoid nonsense.

    India occupies two percent of the world’s land area and has 17 percent of the world’s population. Agriculture requires land. And huge amounts of water. India’s fresh water reserves are pitifully little. Water tables are dropping. India — and Indians — cannot afford to earn a living growing food. Indians have to bring something else to the global table. It cannot be food. It has to be manufactures or even services, but not food.

    Sure India needs food, and food that is produced in India. But there is a limit to food productivity and food production. New Zealand with it single-digit million population can be single-crop economy and prosper. India cannot because India is no New Zealand. India has a population of 1,200 million people.

    India’s agricultural productivity has to increase so that its production goes up and fewer people are in agriculture. Arithmetic again. If 100 percent of the population is engaged in producing food, surely no one can be “rich” because to be rich one has to have something other than food. Who is going to produce that something other if everyone is engaged in producing food? Answer me that!

    The simple fact is that India is poor because too many people are in agriculture. What India has to do is to move out of agriculture and go into manufacturing and services. But then, you have to be educated to be in manufacturing and services. With absolutely low percentages of the population even literate, there is scant chance of being educated.


    Why aren’t Indians educated — even literate? Because the government does not allow education and literacy. Really? Yes, really.
    India has to move to manufacturing and into services. It can be done, and in a short time. it is a matter of policies. But it cannot happen under the current set of rules, which are such that it forces more and more people into desperate poverty. Why do they do that? Because it helps the policymakers — more specifically the Nehruvian socialist types. The policies they make help them personally and impoverish the nation. That’s what needs to change, not the MNCs
    .
    http://www.deeshaa.org/2011/06/02/th...lion-in-india/

    Now you say whatever you want to. This is the worlds perception of India. Like it or not --- there is a mountain to climb and living in denial mode like you are just knocks you back further.
    I am truly shocked at these figures. This is really high.

  8. #88
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    Re: Indian economy sees growth momentum, says OECD Read more at: http://economictim

    Quote Originally Posted by Amjad Hussain View Post
    So why are millions of Indians spending their life savings trying to get out of India if its so prosperous?
    India haven't got a bigger market yaar. Please use that brain. India have got 650 million foodless. How can you count them as a "market" for gods sake? They are a hindrance and parasite to your economy.
    To compare yourselves with the likes of Canada or USA just clearly shows us the problem India has. If you are the educated souls coming out of your nation then the future is bleak.
    India has fantastic potential and with hard work could start climbing the economical ladder but please for the love of god, open your eyes and be honest with yourselves.
    The topic is not about starvation in india. This poverty is due to british rule over India.
    [MENTION=3955]Amjad Hussain[/MENTION] ,Indians are getting out of the country because of the performance and talent shown by indians all over the world. They are called by foriegn companies to work for them and with that also they are contributing to indian economy.
    Market means the area where investments can be done with good probability of getting profit.In india ,middle class is huge and this contributes in such a great market. Our foodless people are not a hindrance for our economy sooner or later they will be joined with the mainstreamand will help in increasing Indian Economy and now there condition is getting better with change in ruler of the country.
    I am not comparing with the developed countries ,they have their own market,I am saying that india have market which is developing and huge also that's why I said that I will start my company here in india.
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    Last edited by aryavart; 5th November 2014 at 10:17.

  9. #89
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by Goku View Post
    [MENTION=75]Express[/MENTION],I've more reliable source than yours.....Acc. to reuters... it doesn't reflect 800 million at all...

    Thirty-three percent of world’s poorest live in India

    India has 33 percent of the world’s poorest 1.2 billion people, even though the country’s poverty rate is half as high as it was three decades ago, according to a new World Bank report.
    So why did you say in post 83 a figure of 200 million and now say 400 million? You see because you constantly make up stories no one believes a liar.
    Now back to topic. India has good potential because of the sheer population but to say Indias economy is booming is a dream and certainly delusional. The starving is certainly going to hold growth back as India is too busy feeding them.
    One thing worth noting is the fact that Modi has encouraged millions to open back accounts. Now the next step is to give them work and opportunity to put $ in them.
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  10. #90
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by manuu View Post
    So why did you say in post 83 a figure of 200 million and now say 400 million? You see because you constantly make up stories no one believes a liar.
    Now back to topic. India has good potential because of the sheer population but to say Indias economy is booming is a dream and certainly delusional. The starving is certainly going to hold growth back as India is too busy feeding them.
    One thing worth noting is the fact that Modi has encouraged millions to open back accounts. Now the next step is to give them work and opportunity to put $ in them.
    Thanks for saying that India has got potential.No one is delusing here. [MENTION=8506]Goku[/MENTION] thankx for positive information about growing information about India's economy.
    India is developing nation so buisness condition will improve here ,and with such huge middle class many nation's are investing here as you can see from [MENTION=8506]Goku[/MENTION] 's posts. [MENTION=4263]manuu[/MENTION] thanks for praising modi here.
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by manuu View Post
    So why did you say in post 83 a figure of 200 million and now say 400 million?
    1) this is the figure by world bank,they consider that a person living below $1.25 is poor but in India we have different criteria for considering poor,according to our living condition.The world bank data is not normalized for different country,as argued by many economists.It is only income based analysis.many countries follow their different poverty line criteria,India is one of them.

    2) according to our below poverty line data,its around 200 million.Our poverty line analysis is not only income based.Since we have federal govt,it differs state to state.Foe eg..in kerala,a person will be called below poverty line if Families which lack access to four or more parameters are classified as BPL.

    No land or less than five cents of land
    No house or dilapidated house
    No sanitation latrine
    Family without colour television (later replaced with "family with an illiterate adult member")
    No regular employed person in the family
    No access to safe drinking water
    Women-headed household or presence of widows or divorcee
    Scheduled castes and scheduled tribes (SC/ST)
    Mentally retarded or disabled member in the family

    3)
    Now, only 22 per cent Indians below poverty line: Planning Commission

    The number of India's poor fell to less than a quarter of its population in 2011-12, according to a Planning Commission estimate, giving the government a reason to cheer amid the recent raft of disappointing macro economic data.

    The commission said on Tuesday the number of those below the poverty line declined to 21.9% of the population in 2011-12, from 29.8% in 2009-10 and 37.2% in 2004-05.


    The estimate, based on a survey of household consumer expenditure, showed rural poverty declined to 25.7% from 41.8% in 2004-05, while in urban areas it fell to 13.7% from 25.7%.

    The sharp drop was attributed to the high real growth in recent years, which raised the consumption capacity.

    The data showed that nearly 2 crore people were pulled out of poverty every year from 2004-05 onwards, which resulted in a sharp drop in those below the Tendulkar poverty line to 27 crore in 2011-12 from 40.7 crore in 2004-05.

    The national level poverty ratio is based on Suresh Tendulkar methodology, which uses the mixed reference period after National Sample Survey Office (NSSO) tabulated expenditure of about 1.2 lakh households across the country.

    The national poverty line has been fixed at Rs 816 per capita per month for rural areas and Rs 1,000 for urban areas.

    "Thus, for a family of five, the all-India poverty line in terms of consumption expenditure would amount to about 4,080 per month in rural areas and 5,000 per month in urban areas," the Planning Commission said.

    The government has set up a committee under C Rangarajan to review the Tendulkar methodology that has been criticised in the past for fixing poverty lines that were too low at 22.42 per person in rural areas and 28.65 in urban areas.
    "Since the data from the NSS (National Sample Survey) 68th round (2011-12) of household consumer expenditure survey is now available, and the Rangarajan committee recommendation will only be available a year later, the Planning Commission has updated the poverty estimates for the year 2011-12 as per the methodology recommended by Tendulkar committee," the Planning Commission said in a release.

    The release showed there would still be a decline in the poverty rates from 2004-05 levels even if a method other than the Tendulkar methodology was used to determine the poverty line.

    Data from the survey in 2009-10 has not been used for comparison as the year was a drought year. In 2004-05, 37.2% of the country's population was below the poverty line with ratios for rural and urban areas at 41.8% and 25.7%.

    The rate of decline was 0.74% per annum during the 11-year period from 1993-94 to 2004-05.

    Uttar Pradesh had the highest number of poor people at 598.19 lakh, which is 29.4% of the state's total population followed by Bihar at 358.15 lakh (33.7%), Madhya Pradesh at 234.06 lakh (31.6%), Maharashtra at 197.92 lakh (17.3%) and West Bengal at 184.98 lakh (19.9%).

    Prime minister Manmohan Singh had last week highlighted the UPA government's record in poverty reduction, contrasting with the lower fall in the NDA regime and earlier.

    "The percentage of population below the poverty line declined at 0.75 percentage points per year before our government came to office in 2004-05. It has fallen more than 2 percentage points per year between 2004-05 and 2011-12," Singh said at an industry association function last week.

    (source:http://articles.economictimes.indiat...-poverty-rates)
    4)About starvation,no such census record ever taken by any organisation which can tell exactly how many are starving,It is totally based on,how many are poors.Although,according to the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization reported that an estimated 217 million Indians were undernourished in 2012.(neither 800 nor 650 million)
    But if u have so much interest about famine and all,then let me aware u of that, lots of food subsidization programme is currently run by central govt and state govt like 'amma canteen','mid day meal','food subsidy bill','national food security bill' etc..Do familiarize yourself with these programme.


    yes we have starving people and its like a curse on us but we are dealing with it.


    I think,I have cleared your all your doubts regarding this.Still if u have any query feel free to ask.
    Last edited by Goku; 5th November 2014 at 15:04.

  12. #92
    Member Goku's Avatar
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by manuu View Post
    So why did you say in post 83 a figure of 200 million and now say 400 million? You see because you constantly make up stories no one believes a liar.
    I've clarified u in my previous posts that I don't make stories,If I had to why would I post that UN data,its just u didn't get me correctly.U alleged me of being a liar but would u alleged [MENTION=75]Express[/MENTION] [MENTION=3955]Amjad Hussain[/MENTION] for the same,they have presented the wrong data and tried to defame my country.Would u have liked this,if I might have done the same.

  13. #93
    Member Goku's Avatar
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by manuu View Post
    but to say Indias economy is booming is a dream and certainly delusional.
    You might assume whatever u want out of jealousy,but I would definitely lend my ears to those renowned economist and CEOs who are impressed by India's economy growth.(I have posted their views in previous page,u can feed them).Its not dreaming ,dear.
    certainly delusional
    I think this word is the best way for you guys to decline the magnitude of 'ambitious'. go on...

    The starving is certainly going to hold growth back as India is too busy feeding them.
    If we were too busy in feeding them then certainly our growth story would be different,we won't have hosted our flag to moon and mars,we won't have achieve the second highest GDP growth rate,we won't have the largest producers and exporters of many food grains.
    We believe in subsequential development.In one hand we are allowing FDI, and in the other hand we have schemes like MNREGA,mid day meal,etc.. for poors
    This is our way,dude

  14. #94
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    Indian govt plans to cut 25-30% customs duty on ships fuel

    NEW DELHI: According to the Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s ‘Make in India’ campaign to transport goods manufactured in India in a cost-effective way, the government plans to remove the 25-30 percent customs duty levied on fuels used by Indian ships and ease other logistical hurdles to push for more usage of the sea route for both domestic and international cargo, official sources said.
    The move follows Shipping Minister Nitin Gadkari’s plans to develop the sector that is seen as essential in providing the much-needed connectivity for Prime Minister compaign.
    “We have managed to convince the finance ministry’s revenue department to relax the 25-30 percent tax on fuels used by trans-shipment ships sporting the Indian flag when they ferry items to and from Indian ports,” a senior official told IANS, not wishing to be named.
    “During a presentation we made recently, the prime minister apparently was surprised that such a levy was being imposed. He was in favour of removing such a tax, which is more of an irritant than any revenue-generating proposition,” he said.
    Officials said the immediate impact of such a move will be a revenue loss of just around Rs.60 crore per annum but its potential in driving the use of sea route for moving goods for domestic and export markets is seen at an additional Rs.1,000 crore.
    Shipping Secretary Vishwapati Trivedi also hinted at this possibility. “Our mission is to make a sustained effort to help the shipping industry overcome issues like funding and logistics so that dispatching goods from India becomes easier,” Trivedi told IANS.
    In spite of India’s total exports topping $314 billion, and 45 percent of it by sea, any or every cargo coming and going from India is trans-shipped to mega hubs like Colombo or Singapore where mother ships weighing 165,000 tonnes or more are loaded.
    Trans-shipment means a cargo first moving to a port nearby in smaller ships and then loaded to a larger “mother” ship for the final destination. This, despite the fact that India has 12 major and 187 minor ports located around the 7,517-km long coastline of the country.
    “There is a strong linkage between the relaxation of cabotage (or shipping from port-to-port) rules and developing the Indian ports to become trans-shipment hubs — similar to Singapore and Colombo,” said Samar Nath, chief executive of DHL Global Forwarding.
    Trans-shipment of goods adds to the overall cost of shipping from India, making a cheap industrial base like India lose its competitive advantage. Currently, 45 percent of India’s trade is trans-shipped through ports at Colombo, Salalah and Jebel Ali.
    With the development of a trans-shipment port and entry of larger ships, the per unit cost of the export-import sector is expected to come down, benefiting both the trade with lower costs and the customer in competitive pricing, experts said.
    ” ‘Make in India’ is a great initiative but it will not deliver as expected unless logistics costs come down,” Julian Michael Bevis, senior director, group relations in South Asia, The Maersk, a global trade and shipping conglomerate, told IANS.
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  15. #95
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    Re: India's economy

    http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/...w/49491016.cms

    Japan offers India soft loan for $15 billion bullet train in edge over China

    1. Japan has offered to finance India's first bullet train, estimated to cost $15 billion, at an interest rate of less than 1% interest.
    Japanese are offering technology and funding together.


    2. 505-kilometre corridor linking Mumbai with Ahmedabad,

    3. China won the contract to assess the feasibility of a high-speed train between Delhi and Mumbai, a 1,200-km route estimated to cost twice as much. No loan has yet been offered.


    4. 'Diamond Qaudrilateral' of high speed trains over 10,000 km of track that India wants to set up connecting Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata. Japan has offered to meet 80 percent of the Mumbai-Ahmedabad project cost, on condition that India buys 30 percent of equipment including the coaches and locomotives from Japanese firms, officials said.


    日本はインド、本当の信頼された友人の21世紀のパートナーです

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