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  1. #41
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    I think reduction in defence and increase in assisting the poor. Story in our region

  2. #42
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    India cuts growth rate forecast to 5.7-5.9%



    Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh gestures during the inauguration of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) 85th Annual General Meeting on Economy, Enterprise and Employment in New Delhi on Dec 15, 2012. India's prime minister on said his government's reforms to spur the economy are “only the beginning” as he lashed out at “excessive pessimism” that he said was damaging the investment climate. - AFP Photo

    Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh gestures during the inauguration of the Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry (FICCI) 85th Annual General Meeting on Economy, Enterprise and Employment in New Delhi on Dec 15, 2012. India’s prime minister on said his government’s reforms to spur the economy are “only the beginning” as he lashed out at “excessive pessimism” that he said was damaging the investment climate. – AFP Photo

    NEW DELHI: India on Monday cut its growth forecast for the current fiscal year to just below six per cent, putting Asia’s third-largest economy on track for its worst annual performance in a decade.

    The finance ministry said “supportive” moves from the central bank would be needed even for the economy to expand at the revised level of 5.7-to-5.9 per cent, down from 7.85 per cent estimated at the start of the year.

    The forecast came a day before the bank was expected to keep the benchmark interest rate on hold as it waits for stubborn inflation to ease, despite mounting pressure for a cut to boost the sluggish economy.

    “It should be possible for the economy to improve the overall growth rate of GDP (for the year) to around 5.7 per cent to 5.9 per cent” from 5.4 per cent in the first half, said the Mid-Year Economic Analysis tabled in parliament.

    The full-year rate would be far below the near double-digit pace India set before the onset of the global financial crisis.

    Finance Minister P. Chidambaram has been urging the central bank to reduce high interest rates to bolster the economy.

    But the bank has kept rates steady since April – when it cut them for the first time in three years – unlike other developing countries which have lowered borrowing costs to shield their economies from the eurozone crisis.

    India’s bank has insisted inflation must recede and the government needs to curb its ballooning fiscal deficit – the widest of all emerging market economies – before more rate cuts.

    Growth in 2011-12 fell to a nine-year low of 6.5 per cent hit by high interest rates, struggling overseas economies and sluggish investment caused by concerns about policymaking and corruption.

    India’s economy has not expanded by less than 6.5 per cent since the 2002-2003 financial year.

    Economists had already cut their year growth forecasts to mid-five per cent or lower.

    India cuts growth rate forecast to 5.7-5.9% | Business | DAWN.COM
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  3. #43
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    India PM calls eight per cent economic growth ‘ambitious’
    AFP | 27th December, 2012

    Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh. — Photo by AFP/File

    NEW DELHI: India’s Prime Minister Manmohan Singh played down hopes Thursday for the once-booming economy’s performance, saying achieving annual eight per cent growth to 2017 would be an “ambitious” achievement.

    Singh’s muted expectations come after the government earlier this month cut its growth forecast to just under six percent for this financial year – putting Asia’s third-largest economy on track for its worst annual showing in a decade.

    “Achieving a target of eight per cent growth, following less than six per cent in the first year, is still an ambitious target,” he told state chief ministers meeting in New Delhi to review the government’s 2012-2017 economic plan.

    Despite moves to liberalise its economy, India still runs on five-year plans based on the former Soviet Union’s central planning model.

    Much of the world would envy even six per cent growth. But the pace is not enough for New Delhi, which says it needs at least nine-to-10 per cent expansion to significantly cut poverty and create jobs for a soaring young workforce.

    This year’s forecast growth would also be far below the near double-digit pace India logged before the onset of the global financial crisis.

    “The country faces many challenges to achieve sustainable growth,” Singh added.

    Singh said the biggest obstacles to expansion were dilapidated railways, roads, ports and other infrastructure that creates transport bottlenecks and slows production.

    “(Improved) infrastructure is the best guarantee for rapid growth,” he said.

    The ruling Congress party had long wanted to make history as the first government to usher in 10 per cent growth. It has been forced to row back in the face of deepening global financial worries and stubborn inflationary pressures.

    Singh’s scandal-scarred government in the past few months has unleashed a blitz of economic reforms to draw more investment and jump-start growth, before facing voters in polls in 2014 and to avert a threatened credit downgrade.

    India PM calls eight per cent economic growth ‘ambitious’ | Business | DAWN.COM
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  4. #44
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    Fiscal cliff resolution is a band-aid approach: Bibek Debroy

    There is a very serious deficit problem. So there have to be either tax increases or spending cuts. Whichever way it is staggered, the US economy is bound to slow down.
    ET Now caught up with Bibek Debroy, Professor, Centre for Policy Research, for his views on the US fiscal cliff and the current scenario of the Indian economy. Excerpts:

    ET Now: Are global investors in for a good year or you think the kind of indications we have got from the United States last night are more like a short-term fix?

    Bibek Debroy: Yes, it is a band-aid approach, but the fundamental issue is a very simple one. There is a very serious deficit problem. So there have to be either tax increases or spending cuts, and the entire debate has been essentially about that. Whichever way it is staggered, the US economy is bound to slow down. The question is over what kind of period one can stagger that slowing down.

    ET Now: Is this more like a band-aid approach and will this do precious little to jumpstart the US economy?

    Bibek Debroy: Absolutely, because we more or less know what the shape of the deal is going to be. In fact, they have known what the shape of the deal is going to be for a significant amount of time. We know that we are talking about tax increases by anything between 400 to 600 billion and we also know that there are going to be spending cuts of the neighbourhood of 100-150 billion. Now much of that is internal to the economy in the sense that it has implications for healthcare, but for the rest of the world, it is fairly clear that whatever be the form of the deal, the US economy is going to slow down.

    ET Now: What does this mean for economies like India at a time when we have seen a gush of liquidity all through 2012?

    Bibek Debroy: When one is talking about the impact on India, there are three different kinds of impact. One is the real impact and obviously, if the US economy does not do that well, our exports are not going to do well. The second kind is a financial inflow kind of thing. I do not think the US economy slowing down per se reduces inflows into India. If inflows into India, whether they are of the FII type or FDI type, are reduced, that is because of other reasons. But the third one is the most important, which is the great deal of volatility into both capital flows and exchange rate movements. If the Indian economy is going to grow at about 6%, the impact of the US slowdown is going to be minimal on the real part.

    Fiscal cliff resolution is a band-aid approach: Bibek Debroy - The Economic Times

  5. #45
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    India’s current account deficit hits record high of 5.4%

    MUMBAI: India’s current account deficit widened to a record high of 5.4 percent of GDP in the September quarter as export growth slowed more sharply than imports, with a similar gap expected in the December quarter likely to prolong weakness in the rupee.

    The worse-than-expected deficit also adds pressure on the government as it tries to push through long-delayed reforms to stave off a sovereign rating downgrade due to the country’s high deficit on both the current and fiscal accounts. A sharp rise in gold imports, a hefty oil bill and falling exports due to the global slowdown have kept India’s current account deficit at persistently high levels.

    “Even with curbs on gold import, if you have the current account deficit going up, it will be a hit on the country’s sentiment as a whole,” said Vikas Babu Chittiprolu, a senior foreign exchange dealer with state-run Andhra Bank. India ran a balance of payments deficit of $158 million for the July-September quarter, against a surplus of $521 million in the previous quarter and compared with a surplus of $276 million a year earlier, the RBI data showed.

    The current account deficit was $22.3 billion in the three months through September, or 5.4 percent of GDP, compared with $16.6 billion in the June quarter and $18.9 billion in the September quarter of 2011.

    India’s April-November fiscal deficit rose to 4.13 trillion rupees, or 80.4 percent of the budgeted target for the fiscal year ending in March, casting doubt on the government’s pledge to mend its finances following a higher-than-budgeted expenditure bill. The rupee was the third worst performer in Asia in 2012, even though net inflows into Indian stocks were the highest in the region. The rupee closed 2012 at 55.00.

    “In the absence of any positive trigger the rupee could move a tad up to 53-54 in Jan-March due to seasonal dollar inflows,” Yes Bank’s Rao said.

    India’s financial account, which includes foreign direct investment, portfolio investment and overseas borrowing by Indian companies, stood at a surplus of $24.2 billion, higher than the $15.7 billion in the June quarter, and compared with $19 billion in the year-earlier period.

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  6. #46
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    I think Indian figures are not accirate and the true figures are much worse

  7. #47
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Neo;64277]

    [CENTER]

    Afsoss........... Saheb abhi bhi chup hain.

    No One knows, when he will speak.
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  8. #48
    Senior Member sami's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=contract killer;68621]
    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post

    [CENTER]

    Afsoss........... Saheb abhi bhi chup hain.

    No One knows, when he will speak.
    Hes thinking what shall I do now economy is going wrong way

  9. #49
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=sami;68627]
    Quote Originally Posted by contract killer View Post

    Hes thinking what shall I do now economy is going wrong way
    He is thinking.............. O God!! now again they will ask me to speak.
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  10. #50
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    India industrial output likely barely grew in Nov

    Thursday, January 10, 2013

    BANGALORE: India’s manufacturers barely increased production in November compared to the year before as factories closed for holidays a month later than in 2011, a Reuters poll found on Wednesday.

    The survey of 25 economists predicted that the index of industrial production (IIP), measuring output at factories, mines and utilities, rose just 0.7 percent year-on-year in November following an 8.2 percent rise in October.

    Production was likely hit as Diwali, a widely observed religious festival in India that sees many factories shutting shop for a day or two, was celebrated in November last year. The year before it was in October. “Comparatively there were lesser working days in November 2012 and hence the base effect,” said Aman Mohunta, economist at Nomura.

    Forecasts for the notoriously volatile indicator ranged from a contraction of 3.3 percent to growth of 6.3 percent. November’s reading will be knocked by the previous year’s IIP clocking a high 6 percent.

    November’s median expectation is lower than the average 1.1 percent growth seen so far in calendar 2012 and is significantly below the double-digit growth rates that IIP posted between late 2006 and early 2008.

    “The momentum continues to be slow. We don’t expect a spectacular pick up, at the same time we don’t expect a further fall either,” added Mohunta.

    Mohunta saw November’s factory output shrinking by 3 percent annually but expects it to grow around 0.5-1 percent in the next couple of months. Other economists share expectations of a pick up over the next few months.

    “Infrastructure has been seeing some improvement. We are not seeing a very sharp rebound, but sentiment has improved,” said Quant Capital Economist Bhupesh Bameta, adding that annual IIP growth is moving towards the 3-4 percent range in the near term.

    Infrastructure output, or core output data, which is typically released before the headline number and accounts for nearly 38 percent of overall industrial production, grew 1.8 percent year-on-year in November, sharply slower than in the previous month.

    India has been plagued by sticky inflation, burgeoning deficits, a slowdown in domestic savings, a slump in exports and economic growth that is likely to be the worst in a decade.

    Both the Reserve Bank of India and the government have recently expressed concern over the ballooning deficits, particularly the current account gap which was the widest in absolute terms since 1949 in September.

    Economists will closely watch December inflation data due to be released on Monday for further signs that the RBI could cut rates. Expectations for a rate cut when the RBI’s policy committee meets on Jan 29 hardened last month after November wholesale price data showed inflation at a 10-month low.

    Despite a clamour among politicians and business for lower interest rates with GDP growth in 2012-13 headed for a decade low, the size of the fiscal and external deficits and hitherto stubborn inflation has stayed the central banks’ hand. Economists were wary about predicting a sustainable upturn based on the positive factory production forecasts.

    “We are not saying that we are out of the woods. Things are quite bad right now but the direction is positive so that should give some hope for industrial data,” Bameta said.

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  11. #51
    Senior Member ManojKumar's Avatar
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    The government uncertainty and the money scandals have not helped. Eye off the ball

  12. #52
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    Consumption jump to push up India's economic growth rate to 6.7% in FY14: Crisil

    Mumbai: Ratings agency Crisil today said a revival in consumption will push up the country's gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate to 6.7 per cent in FY'14, from 5.5 per cent estimated for the current fiscal (FY13).

    "India's GDP will grow at a higher rate of 6.7 per cent in 2013-14 in comparison to 5.5 per cent estimated for the current fiscal due to a revival in consumption," the agency's research division said in a note.

    Improvement in the farm sector, lower interest rates and higher government spending will drive the consumption demand, it added.
    The estimates from Crisil come at a time when the economy has witnessed a a downward revision of growth estimates by analysts for a better part of the ongoing fiscal due to troubles on the global and domestic front.

    The Reserve Bank had revised its estimate downwards to 5.7 per cent from 6.5 per cent in the October monetary policy announcement.

    On the global front, worries around the Euro zone have been a concern while domestically a perception of policy paralysis till September, elevated rates due to inflation and issue of getting faster project clearances did not help.
    International rating agencies have also called for immediate action on the high fiscal deficit.
    Crisil said it expects fiscal deficit to fall to 5.5 per cent in 2013-14 from the 5.8 per cent it estimates for FY' 13.

    It today said the Reserve Bank, whose elevated interest rates have been one of the factors blamed for the lower growth, will cut its interest rates

    Consumption jump to push up India's economic growth rate to 6.7% in FY14: Crisil

  13. #53
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    Indian economy will grow 6.1% this year: United Nations | Firstpost

    New Delhi: Indian economy is projected to grow at a slower pace of 6.1 percent this year even as exports and capital investments are likely to be much better than in 2012, according to the United Nations.

    The UN has trimmed its growth forecast from 7.2 percent estimated in June 2012. However, the forecast of 6.1 per cent growth for this year is much better than 5.5 percent expansion seen in 2012, as per the UN ‘World Economic Situation and Prospects 2013′ report.

    According to the UN, India’s annual growth declined from over 9 percent clocked in 2010. Reuters
    “GDP growth in India will accelerate to 6.1 percent in 2013 and 6.5 percent in 2014 as a result of stronger growth of exports and capital investment… Investment demand is expected to respond to a more accommodative monetary policy stance and slightly improved business confidence,” it said.

    UN ESCAP’s (Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific) Chief Economist Nagesh Kumar today said that India has huge growth potential in the long term. India and China are playing a major role in the growth of world economy,” he told reporters here.

    The slowdown in growth to 5.5 percent last year “reflected weaker consumption and investment demand as a result of persistent inflation, high nominal interest rates, large fiscal deficits and political gridlock,” the UN said. These factors would likely continue to impact economic growth in the next two years even as a moderate recovery is expected, it said.

    According to the UN, India’s annual growth declined from over 9 percent clocked in 2010 to about 5.5 percent last year,”the slowest pace in ten years”. Regarding measures to contain inflation in the country, Nagesh Kumar said monetary tightening would not be the “right tool”.

    He also expressed optimism that the Reserve Bank of India (RBI) would ease its policy in the coming months. Wholesale Price Inflation (WPI) touched a three-year low of 7.18 percent in December but retail inflation continued to remain in double digit at 10.56 percent.

    Further, WPI inflation was much above the central bank’s comfort level of 4-5 percent. The inflation has not declined to the expected levels despite tight monetary stance pursued by the RBI to check price rise.
    Meanwhile, the report said economic growth in South Asia fell to its lowest in 10 years in 2012.

    “After growing by 5.8 percent in 2011… South Asia’s gross domestic product expanded by only 4.4 percent in 2012. Going forward, economic growth in the region is projected to accelerate to 5 percent in 2013 and 5.7 percent in 2014, led by a gradual recovery in India,” the UN said.

    Indian economy accounts for almost three-quarter of South Asia’s overall GDP. Other countries in South Asia region include Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.
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  14. #54
    Professionals Martin's Avatar
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    Re: India's economy

    India's economy is $1.76 trillion for 2013. Will be $1.75 trillion for 2014 due to falling Rupee.

    Quick snapshot of Indian economy (using IMF data).

    India's 2013 nominal GDP: $1.76 trillion
    India's 2014 nominal GDP: $1.75 trillion

    India's 2013 nominal per-capita GDP: $1,414
    India's 2014 nominal per-capita GDP: $1,389

    ----------

    List of countries by past and future GDP (nominal) | Wikipedia (based on IMF data)



    Primary source from IMF: ^ Figures from the October 2013 update of the International Monetary Fund's World Economic Outlook Database. Figure for EU, accessed 9 October 2013. Figures for the countries of the world, accessed 9 October 2013.

    ----------

    International Monetary Fund | Report for India

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    Last edited by Martin; 2nd January 2014 at 23:18.
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  15. #55
    Member Ravi01's Avatar
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    India's economy is $1.76 trillion for 2013. Will be $1.75 trillion for 2014 due to falling Rupee.

    Quick snapshot of Indian economy (using IMF data).

    India's 2013 nominal GDP: $1.76 trillion
    India's 2014 nominal GDP: $1.75 trillion

    India's 2013 nominal per-capita GDP: $1,414
    India's 2014 nominal per-capita GDP: $1,389

    ----------

    List of countries by past and future GDP (nominal) | Wikipedia (based on IMF data)



    Primary source from IMF: ^ Figures from the October 2013 update of the International Monetary Fund's World Economic Outlook Database. Figure for EU, accessed 9 October 2013. Figures for the countries of the world, accessed 9 October 2013.

    ----------

    International Monetary Fund | Report for India

    These figure is false figures.Not accurate.Another poor sourse

  16. #56
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravi01 View Post
    These figure is false figures.Not accurate.Another poor sourse
    Theyre figures from the IMF which is internationally reputable.

    What do you think is the real figure then? 100 Trillion?
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  17. #57
    Senior Member manuu's Avatar
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    Re: India's economy

    Quote Originally Posted by Ravi01 View Post
    These figure is false figures.Not accurate.Another poor sourse
    Are we pushing the boundaries of stupidity here [MENTION=4057]Ravi01[/MENTION]. IMF figures not good enough for you?
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  18. #58
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    Re: India's economy

    Tata Nano safety under scrutiny after dire crash test results

    As the workers strap the crash-test dummies into the front seat of the little car, they look concerned. Not about the vehicle, they insist, they are worried about the dummies.

    Each of the figures, engineered to resemble the height, weight and bone structure of a human being, are worth about €100,000 (£82,000). For the same sum, you could buy the vehicle they are sitting in 60 times over.

    When it was launched in 2009 at a cost of roughly $2,000 (£1,210), the Tata Nano was heralded as the low-cost vehicle that would motorise the Indian masses, a kind of Asian equivalent of the Volkswagen Beetle. If the car proved a success in India, the industrialist Ratan Tata hinted at the time, a European and US version would be rolled out within a couple of years.

    The car passed a crash test in England, and Tata claimed to be confident of a four-star rating in the Global New Car Assessment Programme (Ncap).

    But the results of the Ncap test, conducted last month at ADAC, the German equivalent of the AAA, in Landsberg, Bavaria, raised serious questions about the risks posed by Tata's so-called frugal engineering approach to car safety. The Tata Nano received a zero-star adult protection rating and failed to meet even the most basic UN safety requirements.

    After hitting a wall at 40mph, the vehicle pirouetted around its axis by about 150 degrees and skidded a couple of metres to the left. Its nose folded like a cardboard box, wrapping around the dummy in the driver's seat. The right-hand wheel burst through the floor of the vehicle, crushing the dummy's legs. By the time the car had come to a standstill, the right wrist of the driving dummy was protruding from the burst intersection between the windscreen and side windows.

    About 50 cars are crash-tested at the Landsberg laboratories each year. Makeup is applied to the dummies before a test – to the nose, brows and lips – to determine the initial impact, which will leave a smiley face blotted on to the inflated airbag. The Nano, crucially, does not have an airbag, so there were only smudges of paint on the dashboard.

    The results were unequivocal. While the dummies were not quite beyond further use, the test centre reported that human passengers in the front seats would not have survived the crash. The vehicle was also given a zero-star rating for child protection, since it was not possible to install child seats in the car. So far, Tata Motors has not commented on the results of the test.

    Since its launch, the Nano has failed to live up to its creators' high expectations.

    In 2011, the Economist reported that the factory in Sanand, Gujarat, was "barely ticking over". In October last year, the company was selling 2,500 Tatas a month, down from 10,000 in April 2012. This month, before the death of managing director Karl Slym dealt a further blow to the company, Tata launched the slightly more expensive and upmarket Nano Twist in an attempt to boost sales.

    Despite the Nano's travails, David Ward, the secretary general of Ncap, believes the car provides an important service. Even though the Nano has not proved the success story predicted, it is symbolic of changing worldwide car trends. "It took 100 years for the number of cars on the planet to rise to a billion," he adds, "but the amount has doubled in the past decade, and is expected to come close to 2bn in 2020."

    Ward hopes the test results will increase consumer awareness in India, encouraging manufacturers to produce safer cars. "India is sort of the last frontier," he says. "The Chinese are actually moving in a very impressive way towards much better quality vehicles. But India is just twiddling its thumbs. If India came onstream, then gradually the world would be covered."

    Ncap argues that, contrary to suggestions from within the industry that producing cars able to withstand the basic UN crash tests would add thousands to the price of the vehicle, the additional cost would actually be less than a hundred dollars. Standard air bags and so-called "bird beaks" – diamond-shaped cuts in the body frame that direct energy away from the occupant area in a crash – could mean the difference between life and death in an accident, it claims.

    "Poor structural integrity and the absence of airbags are putting the lives of Indian consumers at risk," Ncap's chairman, Max Mosley, says. "They have a right to know how safe their vehicles are and to expect the same basic levels of safety as standard as customers in other part of the world."

    http://www.theguardian.com/global-de...h-test-results
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  19. #59
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    Re: India's economy

    Indian engineering. What a bunch of clowns. And probably top management was cost cutting at every level -- "hey, why use metal -- hardboard will do the trick!"
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  20. #60
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    Re: India's economy

    India - A Cultural Perspective

    Striking the right cord with the Indian consumer is an exercise in managing complexities. India is a large, diverse land of a plethora of sub-cultures, religions, languages, castes, considerable regional differences and more. Complexity in doing business in India is not confined to the bureaucratic hassles, as is largely believed. The real test begins when you start devising your market entry strategy. Understanding the Indian consumer, segmenting the market and developing strategies that work for the target consumer are what demand a deep Cultural understanding.

    It would not be an understatement to say that there could be no generic sets of do's and don'ts of doing business in India. Traditional values, respect for hierarchy and status, religious orientations all find their way into business relationships. Personal relationships need to be kept in focus when doing business in India. Decision making is rarely an individual effort. The list goes on.

    General Business Protocol
    Although most businesses in India follow Western style of communication with Westerners, there are some nuances that you should ideally take care of. For example, when meeting your Indian counterpart,:
    Use a title, “Mr. / Mrs or Ms.” to address, especially if he or she is older to you.
    Wait for a woman business colleague to initiate a greeting. Oftentimes, Indian men do not shake hands with women out of respect.
    Be polite and courteous. Do not be aggressive in your business negotiations.
    Indians generally do not open gifts in front of the person who is giving them. While giving a gift make sure you give it with both hands.
    Do not refuse any food or drink offered to you as it may leave the host feeling inadequate or offended.
    Keep in mind that most Indians are vegetarians and do not take alcohol. It is best to respect your host's preferences while at a lunch or dinner.

    India Entry Basics
    The critical factor in the success of your India entry strategy is finding the right partner who is well versed with the peculiarities of the local market, the procedural issues, taxation and other laws. Sound planning, due diligence, flexibility, ability to adapt quickly, and tremendous patience will go a long way in ensuring success in the long run.



    Key factors favoring Global Businesses entering India:

    The Great Indian Middle Class presents Businesses a large market opportunity.
    Favorable business climate.
    Large pool of labor readily available.
    Good availability of well educated, English speaking managerial workforce.
    Fast growing economy – India is one of the few economies in the world currently that are on a rapid growth path. Experts consider that India has a vast potential for growth and offers considerable scope for expansion to existing businesses as well.
    Less affected by the recent Global Financial Crisis.

    Challenges for businesses include:

    Bureaucratic bottlenecks
    Corruption
    High cost of real estate, which very often does not corelate with the quality.
    Travel and hotels are expensive
    Price sensitive market
    Complex labor and taxation regulations
    Complicated legal, regulatory system
    Regional variations in terms of consumer behavior, preferences, tax regulations and more.
    http://www.abloverseas.com/resources...tive/index.php

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