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Thread: Azerbaijani Cuisine

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  1. #1
    Member rmi5's Avatar
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    Azerbaijani Cuisine

    I will start from the foods that I personally like


    Sabzi qovurma - Lamb stew with herbs

    Sabzi qovurma or lamb stew with herbs is a classic Azerbaijani dish.
    Its name shows that sabzi qovurma is a blend of Persian and Turkic cooking, as "sabzi" means "green" in Persian while "qovurma" in Azerbaijani and other Turkic languages means "fried meat". The fine, complex flavours of Sabzi qovurma belie how simple it is to make. Sabzi qovurma can be served with pilaf rice or as a dish on its own with yoghurt and crushed garlic.

    Preparation time: 30 min
    Cooking time: 45 min
    Serves: 4-5

    Ingredients
    225 g/9 oz lamb
    50 g/2 oz butter
    50 g/2 oz onion
    1 large bunch each of sorrel, coriander, mint, dill, wild leek, young celery with leaves (and spinach or beet leaves if serving sabzi qovurma as a separate dish without rice pilaf)
    1-2 tspns of abgora (juice of unripe grapes) or lemon juice, if not using sorrel
    a few threads of saffron or 1 tspn turmeric
    salt & pepper
    Preparation
    Put a few threads of saffron in a cup and add boiling water. Cover and leave to infuse.
    Chop the lamb into chunks, sprinkle with salt & pepper. Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed pan and brown the meat well.
    Chop the onions and soften separately in butter. If using turmeric, add this to the onions and cook for 1-2 minutes.
    Wash, dry and chop the herbs but not too finely. A variety of herbs should be used, but try not to miss out sorrel, as this gives a tangy flavour to the dish. If making sabzi qovurma to serve on its own, spinach or beet leaves can also be used. (They give out too much water during the cooking process for a classic sabzi qovurma with rice pilaf.)
    Add the abgora or lemon juice (if you are not using sorrel), softened onions, turmeric or saffron infusion and chopped herbs to the meat. Mix well, put a lid on the pan and cook on a low heat. If too much water is coming out of the herbs during cooking, leave the lid off the pan.
    Serve the sabzi qovurma in a bowl with a separate serving plate of rice pilaf, cooked Azerbaijani style, or on its own with yoghurt mixed with crushed garlic.

    [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] [MENTION=3777]Alpha1[/MENTION] [MENTION=2]Aryan_B[/MENTION] [MENTION=3881]Mazea[/MENTION]
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  2. #2
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Very easy to make and delicious:

    Qovurma bozbash - Lamb broth with chestnuts


    Lamb or mutton broths and stews are very popular in Azerbaijan.
    The traditional ingredients of saffron, fresh or dried alcha (a plum similar to a greengage but less sweet) and chestnuts give this broth a distinctly Azerbaijani flavour.

    Preparation time: 40-45 min
    Cooking time: 45 min
    Serves: 3-4

    Ingredients
    175 g/7 oz mutton or lamb
    25 g/1 oz mutton fat (traditional) or vegetable oil
    1 large onion
    100 g/4 oz chickpeas or 2 medium-sized potatoes (chickpeas are traditional)
    50 g/2 oz chestnuts
    25 g/1 oz of fresh or dried alcha, a plum similar to the greengage.
    small bunch of coriander
    few threads of saffron (optional)
    salt & pepper
    Preparation
    Soak the dried chickpeas overnight in cold water. Rinse.
    Put the saffron threads in a cup and add boiling water. Cover and leave to infuse.
    Pierce the chestnuts. Cover with water in a pan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 5 minutes. Remove from the water and shell. Don't take all the chestnuts out of the water at once, as they are difficult to shell when dry.
    Cut the lamb or mutton into 30-35 g pieces and add salt & pepper. Brown together with the onions in mutton fat or vegetable oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pan.
    Add 1-1.5 litres/1.5-2.5 pints of stock or water to the pan and bring to the boil.
    Add the chickpeas or peeled potatoes, chestnuts and alcha and simmer for 30 minutes.
    Season with the saffron infusion and sprinkle with herbs before serving.
    In summer 50 g/2 oz of red tomatoes can be used instead of the alcha and saffron infusion.

    http://news.az/recipes/26215
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  3. #3
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Kofta Tabrizi - Tabriz meatballs


    A Tabriz meatball is an even larger version of the kofta. It is made with minced veal or lamb packed round a filling of hard-boiled egg and fruit.
    Tabriz is an ethnically Azerbaijani city, capital of Iran's East Azerbaijan Province. The name kofta is derived from the Persian and "pounding", as traditionally the meat for the meatballs is pounded almost into a paste.

    Preparation time: 80 minutes
    Cooking time: 1 hour
    Serves: 4-5

    Ingredients
    For the meatballs
    500 g/1 lb 4 oz minced meat (veal or lamb)
    75 g/3 oz short-grain rice
    2 large onion
    125 g/5 oz split peas
    2 medium-sized potatoes
    5 eggs
    4 dried plums or greengages
    a few sprigs of parsley, coriander, dill
    pinch of turmeric
    salt & pepper
    For the bouillon
    1 can chopped tomatoes (450 grams/1lb 1oz)
    6 or so fresh greengages
    1 green, 1 red sweet pepper
    Preparation
    Peel and chop 1 onion and mix with the minced meat.
    Bring a large pan of lightly salted water to the boil. Add the rice and cook at a fairly rapid boil for 10 minutes or so until almost cooked. Strain.
    Rinse the split peas, bring to the boil in a large pan of water and simmer until cooked (approximately 20 minutes, depending on the split peas).
    Boil and mash the potatoes.
    Add the cooked rice, split peas and mashed potato to the minced meat. Add 3 raw eggs, salt & pepper, 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric and the chopped herbs. Mix well.
    Knead the mixture by hand for 20 minutes until sticky, or use a food processor. This is to prevent the meatball coming apart in the bouillon.
    Hard boil the 2 other eggs. Shell and halve the eggs.
    Peel and cut the other onion into rounds. Fry the onion in oil in a deep pan until golden. Remove 2/3 of the onions and set aside. Add the tin of tomatoes (450 grams/1lb 1oz) to the remaining onions in the pan. While the tomatoes are frying, divide the mince into 4 parts.
    Take a portion of the mince mixture, and push a hard-boiled egg, some of the fried onion and a dried plum or greengage into the centre. Shape the mixture into a ball. A walnut kernel is an optional extra for the filling, while the dried plum can be substituted with dried pear or a fresh greengage.
    Do the same with the three other meatballs.
    Once the tomatoes are cooked, add water to the pot. Add fresh greengages, if in season, and roughly chopped fresh peppers, salt & pepper. Once the water has come to the boil, add the meatballs to the pot. When they have risen to the surface, cook for another 45 minutes over a moderate heat.
    The meatballs and bouillon are served separately. The bouillon is eaten as a soup and the meatballs as a main dish.

    http://news.az/recipes/23890
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  4. #4
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Lovely thread @mi5, i'll definitely try the Qovurma bozbash some day.

    Thanks for sharing the recipes
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  5. #5
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    Lovely thread @mi5, i'll definitely try the Qovurma bozbash some day.

    Thanks for sharing the recipes
    Agree with the sentiment here Nice one [MENTION=7521]rmi5[/MENTION] thanks for sharing. I too will try some of these
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Yarpag dolmasi - Stuffed vine leaves

    Stuffed vine leaves

    The term dolma covers a variety of stuffed vegetable dishes, widespread in the Middle East and Mediterranean area.
    Stuffed vine leaves or yarpag dolmasi are one of the most popular forms of dolma. Stuffed vine leaves are served as a main dish in Azerbaijani cuisine, whereas in other countries they are often served as an appetiser. Azerbaijani dolma also have a distinctive round shape, unlike the Turkish cigar-shaped dolma.

    Preparation time: 90 min
    Cooking time: 60 min
    Serves: 5-6

    Ingredients
    150 g/6 oz vine leaves
    500 g/1 lb 4 oz minced lamb or 250 g/10 oz minced lamb and 250 g/10 oz minced beef
    200 g/8 oz onion
    Salt & pepper
    1/2 tspn turmeric
    1/2 tspn cinnamon
    Fresh herbs - coriander, dill, mint and tarragon
    50 g/2 oz short-grain rice
    50 g/2 oz chickpeas (optional)
    80 g/3.2 oz lamb fat (traditional) or butter (for a lighter filling)
    Preparation
    Take the butter out of the fridge so it will be soft enough to mix in.
    If using fresh herbs, wash and chop finely.
    Wash and rinse the rice but do not cook in advance.
    If you are using chickpeas, cook them in advance and halve the cooked peas.
    Mix the mince and chopped onion with your hands.
    Add the rice, chopped herbs or dried spices, salt & pepper, chickpeas and lamb fat or butter. Mix thoroughly.
    If using fresh vine leaves, wash and parboil. If using bottled vine leaves, put them in a large bowl, add hot water and leave for two to three minutes to soften. Strain the leaves.
    Take a vine leaf, place a dollop of mince in the middle and fold the corners of the leaf down and then up into a ball.
    Place the dolma in a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Cover the bottom of the pan with dolma and then add subsequent layers.
    Place an inverted dessert plate or saucer on top of the dolma and weigh down with a heavy object, such as a stone. This helps to stop the dolma unwrapping during cooking. Add water to the pan to the level of the plate.
    Bring the saucepan to the boil. Turn the heat down and simmer for one to one and a half hours until the meat and rice are cooked.
    To check the level of seasoning during cooking, dip a piece of bread into the liquid in the pan and taste.
    Dolma are served with yoghurt mixed with finely chopped garlic and fresh bread.

    http://news.az/recipes/22390

    [MENTION=2139]Khanda[/MENTION] [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION]
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  7. #7
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Am going to make an effort and find an Azer restaurant in London!!
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by KingKong View Post
    Am going to make an effort and find an Azer restaurant in London!!
    Finding Azeri Restaurants should not be easy. In fact, Azeris population unlike Pakistanis or those similar big nations, is not that much large, so overall it's hard to find Azeris outside of Azerbaijani regions But, you can still find some of these foods in Iranian or Turkish restaurants as well. For example, Iranians have adopted Sabzi Qvurma as their national dish. Qovurma bozbash is the easiest one to make and also is the national dish of Azerbaijan.
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  9. #9
    Senior Member Mazea's Avatar
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Azeri have introduced special tasted to the world. Delicious!
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  10. #10
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by rmi5 View Post
    Finding Azeri Restaurants should not be easy. In fact, Azeris population unlike Pakistanis or those similar big nations, is not that much large, so overall it's hard to find Azeris outside of Azerbaijani regions But, you can still find some of these foods in Iranian or Turkish restaurants as well. For example, Iranians have adopted Sabzi Qvurma as their national dish. Qovurma bozbash is the easiest one to make and also is the national dish of Azerbaijan.
    Dont go to much Turkish as there are not many here but will check it out next time I am out. Might even get mrs to look at this thread lol
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  11. #11
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by rmi5 View Post
    Finding Azeri Restaurants should not be easy. In fact, Azeris population unlike Pakistanis or those similar big nations, is not that much large, so overall it's hard to find Azeris outside of Azerbaijani regions But, you can still find some of these foods in Iranian or Turkish restaurants as well. For example, Iranians have adopted Sabzi Qvurma as their national dish. Qovurma bozbash is the easiest one to make and also is the national dish of Azerbaijan.
    http://www.azerbaijanrestaurant.com/gallery.html
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  12. #12
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Well Done!!! I did not expect to see an Azeri restaurant in London BTW, from menu, numbers 2, 7, 40 recipes are shared in this thread
    PS. number 36, which is consisted of Fava beans, rice and beef, is my favorite, and I make it frequently in summers
    BTW, from the menu, restaurant seems to be owned by Southern Azeris(Azeris who live in Iran), since they have added some Iranian foods to their menu as well, like number 14 from southern Iranian dishes, and numbers 20, 43 from southern Caspian region of Iran. number 43 is also very delicious
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  13. #13
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by greencold View Post
    Dont go to much Turkish as there are not many here but will check it out next time I am out. Might even get mrs to look at this thread lol
    If you want to show the thread to Mrs. greencold, then ask her to make to more difficult, but more delicious ones like Sabzi Qovurma BTW, there are videos available in english language in youtube for most of these dishes, which can be a great help as well.

  14. #14
    Media Editor Khanda's Avatar
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by rmi5 View Post
    Well Done!!! I did not expect to see an Azeri restaurant in London BTW, from menu, numbers 2, 7, 40 recipes are shared in this thread
    PS. number 36, which is consisted of Fava beans, rice and beef, is my favorite, and I make it frequently in summers
    BTW, from the menu, restaurant seems to be owned by Southern Azeris(Azeris who live in Iran), since they have added some Iranian foods to their menu as well, like number 14 from southern Iranian dishes, and numbers 20, 43 from southern Caspian region of Iran. number 43 is also very delicious
    Trust me there are many Azeri inspires restaurants. There is one in Surbiton I have been to. Have you ever been to the UK?
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by Khanda View Post
    Trust me there are many Azeri inspires restaurants. There is one in Surbiton I have been to. Have you ever been to the UK?
    I have been in London for short trips, but honestly, I had too much work to do in the city(needed to visit a relative in a hospital, ...), and limited time that did not try to find decent restaurants, and always tried the nearest fast food instead. our community in the area that I am living is very limited, so I wrongly assumed the same thing for London. Anyway, that's a good news for me; since in my future visits to UK, I can go to these restaurants
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    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by rmi5 View Post
    I have been in London for short trips, but honestly, I had too much work to do in the city(needed to visit a relative in a hospital, ...), and limited time that did not try to find decent restaurants, and always tried the nearest fast food instead. our community in the area that I am living is very limited, so I wrongly assumed the same thing for London. Anyway, that's a good news for me; since in my future visits to UK, I can go to these restaurants
    Let me know when you are down. I will take you to my regular food joints!
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  17. #17
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by Superkaif View Post
    Let me know when you are down. I will take you to my regular food joints!
    Thank you very much, brother. I won't come to UK this year, but I guess I will be there in summer of 2016. I'll surely let you know whenever I decided to come to UK.

  18. #18
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Potatoes shashlyk

    Shashlyks or kebabs are a simple grilled entree that consists of alternating seasoned meat and vegetables on a skewer.
    The kebab originated in Persia, where the traditional meat was lamb. Today, kebabs are seen with chicken, beef, goat and fishes. A variety of spice rubs and marinades add distinct flavors to the kebab. Azerbaijan has a rich variety of shashlyks, one of the most traditional of which is made with potatoes and sheep fat. Also potatoes shashlyk is sprinkled with various herbs and spices.

    Preparation time: 5 min
    Cooking time: 15 min
    Serves: 4

    Ingredients
    350 g/14 oz potatoes
    50 g/2 oz sheep fat
    50 g/2 oz spring onions
    a few sprigs of parsley
    salt & pepper
    Preparation
    Peel potatoes, cut into 45-50 gr pieces, blanch in hot salted water for 15-20 sec. Cut sheep fat into 15-20 gr cubes and string alternately with potatoes on a spit. Roast over charcoal. Sprinkle with herbs when serving.

    http://news.az/recipes/27643



    [MENTION=5]Superkaif[/MENTION] [MENTION=2139]Khanda[/MENTION] [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] [MENTION=4873]greencold[/MENTION] [MENTION=8]KingKong[/MENTION]
    I guess you guys should have this kebab or something similar in Pakistan.
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  19. #19
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    Quote Originally Posted by rmi5 View Post
    Potatoes shashlyk

    Shashlyks or kebabs are a simple grilled entree that consists of alternating seasoned meat and vegetables on a skewer.
    The kebab originated in Persia, where the traditional meat was lamb. Today, kebabs are seen with chicken, beef, goat and fishes. A variety of spice rubs and marinades add distinct flavors to the kebab. Azerbaijan has a rich variety of shashlyks, one of the most traditional of which is made with potatoes and sheep fat. Also potatoes shashlyk is sprinkled with various herbs and spices.

    Preparation time: 5 min
    Cooking time: 15 min
    Serves: 4

    Ingredients
    350 g/14 oz potatoes
    50 g/2 oz sheep fat
    50 g/2 oz spring onions
    a few sprigs of parsley
    salt & pepper
    Preparation
    Peel potatoes, cut into 45-50 gr pieces, blanch in hot salted water for 15-20 sec. Cut sheep fat into 15-20 gr cubes and string alternately with potatoes on a spit. Roast over charcoal. Sprinkle with herbs when serving.

    http://news.az/recipes/27643



    [MENTION=5]Superkaif[/MENTION] [MENTION=2139]Khanda[/MENTION] [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] [MENTION=4873]greencold[/MENTION] [MENTION=8]KingKong[/MENTION]
    I guess you guys should have this kebab or something similar in Pakistan.
    looks good to me. Seems a bit like some Iranian food I have had
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  20. #20
    Senior Member Felix's Avatar
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    Re: Azerbaijani Cuisine

    [MENTION=7521]rmi5[/MENTION]

    Such a simple quick dish. Sounds great. Mrs felix may be interested sir in experimenting.
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