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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Of The Ring View Post
    As I said, Russia will sell it self for the right price. they were probably offered a deal of some sort.
    Damn the American $$$
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iranzamin View Post
    bad move. is putin also going the path of medvedev ?
    Its an American toilet paper news aka propaganda
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  3. #23
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    Bit off topic but did you check this thread

    http://pkdefence.com/showthread.php?...=russia+turkey

  4. #24
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    Russia to deliver air defense systems to Syria

    Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyyed Ali Khamenei says the West does not realize that it has vaccinated the Iranian nation against any form of sanctions due to the various bans imposed on the country in the past 30 years.


    “These days Westerners have been creating hype about the sanctions against Iran but they do not understand that they themselves have vaccinated the Iranian nation against any sanctions with the bans imposed in the past 30 years,” the Leader said Wednesday.

    Addressing the 1st International Conference on Women and Islamic Awakening in Tehran, Ayatollah Khamenei added that over the past three decades Iranians have stood up to all conspiracies and sanctions by sacrificing their lives, property, and loved ones.

    “As a result [of these sacrifices] we are now 100 times stronger than we were about 30 years ago,” the Leader said.

    Turning to the situation of women in Iran, the Leader stated that in an Islamic environment, women achieve scientific, personality, ethical and political growth while still remaining a woman.

    Ayatollah Khamenei further said the Western approach to women is humiliating because they objectify women.

    The Leader said highlighting the role of women from the viewpoint of Islam is the most important responsibility of the Muslim world’s elite women.

    “The role of women in social developments, revolutions and the Islamic Awakening movement is decisive because wherever women take part in a social movement with awareness, the progress and victory of that movement is guaranteed,” Ayatollah Khamenei added.

    The 1st International Conference on Women and Islamic Awakening opened in Tehran, on July 10, attended by female intellectuals and scholars from around the world.

    More than 1,500 female researchers and scholars as well as political and social activists from more than 80 countries are taking part in the two-day conference which was inaugurated with an address by Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

    SS/HGH/AZ
    http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2012/07...ated-iranians/

  5. #25
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    I have to agree firstly sanctions do not work. Secondly I think there is a tendency for countries to become self sufficient.

  6. #26
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    Covering Syria: The information war

    Part 1

    Jul 12, 2012


    Covering Syria: The information war
    By Aisling Byrne

    The narrative that has been constructed by the Western mainstream media on Syria may seem to be self-evident from the scenes presented on television, but it is a narrative duplicitously promoted and coordinated so as to conceal and facilitate the regime-change project that is part of the war on Iran.

    What we are seeing is a new stage of information war intentionally constructed and cast as a simplistic narrative of a struggle for human rights and democracy so as deliberately to exclude other interpretations and any geo-strategic motivation.

    The narrative, as CNN puts it, is in essence this: "The vast majority of reports from the ground indicate that government forces are killing citizens in an attempt to wipe out civilians seeking [President Bashar] al-Assad's ouster" - the aim being

    precisely to elicit a heart-wrenching emotional response in Western audiences that trumps all other considerations and makes the call for Western/Gulf intervention to effect regime change.

    But it is a narrative based on distortion, manipulation, lies and videotape.

    In the first months, the narrative was of unarmed protesters being shot by Syrian forces. This then evolved into one of armed insurgents reluctantly "being provoked into taking up arms", as US Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton explained, to defend peaceful protesters.

    It was also a narrative that from the outset, according to a recent report in Time magazine, that the US has facilitated by providing training, support and equipment to Syrian opposition "cyber-warriors".

    Reports confirmed by leading Syrian opposition leaders in April 2011 reveal that in addition to cyber-training, weapons and money from Syrian exiles, as well as from a "major Arab Gulf country" and a Lebanese political party, were being distributed to "young demonstrators". The former head of Russian intelligence, Yevgeny Primakov, similarly noted that the Syrian conflict "started with armed revolts against the authorities, not peaceful demonstrations".

    Ironically, one of the most accurate descriptions of the sectarian conflict we are witnessing in Syria comes from an assessment by the neoconservative Brookings Institute in its March 2012 report "Assessing Options for Regime Change in Syria", one option being for "the United States [to] fight a "clean" war ... and leave the dirty work on the ground to the FSA [Free Syrian Army], perhaps even obviating a massive commitment to Iraq-style nation-building".

    "Let the Arabs do it," echoed Israeli President Shimon Peres. "Do it yourself and the UN will support you." This point was not lost on one leading Turkish commentator, who noted that US Senator John McCain "said that there would be no American boots on the ground in Syria. That means we Turks will have to spill our precious blood to get what McCain and others want in the States."

    In the wake of the failures at state-building in Afghanistan and Iraq, direct intervention, with all the responsibilities this would entail, would not go down well in cash-strapped Western nations. Better to get others to do the "dirty work" - pursue "regime change by civil war".

    "The United States, Europe and the Gulf states ... are starving the regime in Damascus and feeding the opposition. They have sanctioned Syria ... and are busy shoveling money and helping arms supplied by the Gulf get to the rebels," Joshua Landis, director of the Center of Middle Eastern Studies, wrote in Foreign Policy in June.

    With regional allies prepared to do the "dirty work" of providing increasingly sophisticated weapons clearly geared for purposes other than "self-defense", and the FSA and its jihadist allies doing the "dirty work" within Syria (their salaries paid by Saudi Arabia), the US and European nations can proffer their clean hands by limiting support to communications equipment, intelligence and humanitarian aid, and of course to providing the moral posturing required to topple the Syrian system and implant a regime hostile to Iran and friendly to Israel. Having "clean hands" enables the US, France and Britain to pose as abiding by UN standards, while at the same time flouting the UN Charter by promoting an attack on a member state.

    Time magazine reported last month that the administration of US President Barack Obama "has tiptoed across an invisible line. [It] said it will not actively support the Syrian opposition in its bid to oust Assad ... [but] as US officials have revealed, the administration has been providing media-technology training and support to Syrian dissidents by way of small non-profits like the Institute for War & Peace Reporting and Freedom House.

    "Viral videos of alleged atrocities," noted Time, "have made Assad one of the most reviled men on the planet, helping turn the Arab League against him and embarrassing his few remaining allies almost daily."

    It is a position that reeks of hypocrisy: as US columnist Barbara Slavin notes, "Without a UN Security Council mandate, the prospects for US military intervention in Syria are minimal ... the provision of communications gear frees up others to provide weapons."

    A US official quoted by Associated Press was more frank: Washington's equipment and medical supplies to the opposition "can now be easily augmented with weapons from other donors. Smuggling lines are smuggling lines. We use the same donkeys," he said, pointing out that routes are in essence the same for bandages as they are for bullets.

    And while various Western governments are helping "document crimes" committed by Syrian forces, these same governments have refused to investigate their own killings of civilians in attacks by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Libya. NATO "created its own definition for 'confirmed' deaths: only a death that NATO itself investigated and corroborated could be called confirmed", enabling the alliance to conclude: "We have no confirmed reports of civilian casualties."

    Britain was the only country involved in the bombings to conduct its own inquiry. Its report accepted "that coalition forces did their best to prevent and minimize civilian casualties ... We commend them for this approach."

    For every tragic story like journalist Marie Colvin's final dispatch before she was killed while embedded for British media with the FSA ("In Babr Amr. Sickening. Cannot understand how the world can stand by. Watched a baby die today. Shrapnel: doctors could do nothing. His little tummy just heaved and heaved until he stopped. Feeling Helpless"), there are other similar tragedies, committed by the insurgents, that are rarely reported in the mainstream Western press.

    You won't read in the mainstream press of foreign jihadists increasingly pouring into Syria to fight their holy war; you won't read that some ultraconservative Salafi sheikhs in Saudi Arabia are running their own military network inside Syria; you won't read how Assad's support during the 14-month crisis has if anything increased in light of the insecurity gripping the country; you won't read comments like those of the Lebanese Christian Maronite patriarch who said that while "Syria, like other countries, needs reforms which the people are demanding ... the closest thing to democracy [in the Arab world] is Syria".

    You won't read how the head of the opposition in Turkey, a former ambassador to Washington, Faruk Logoglu, has said that what Turkey is doing hosting armed FSA fighters and allowing them to carry out attacks in Syria is "is against all international norms; against all neighborly relations ... It is a basic rule that countries must respect the sovereignty of others."

    You won't read how armed insurgents used the Arab League observer mission's ceasefire to "reinforce themselves and bring supplies from Lebanon, knowing the regime would be limited in its ability to obstruct them at that time", or how they have used the Kofi Annan plan to prepare for larger attacks.

    While we have seen extensive demonization of Assad, his wife and family, with the president depicted recently in the British press bathing in blood, you won't read articles demonizing the Saudi or Qatari regimes, or highlighting the hundreds of millions of dollars they have poured into political parties and groups, particularly Salafists, across the region in their "counter-revolution" against change; or the recent declaration by the official Saudi Mufti for all churches in the Arabian Peninsula to be demolished (which was not covered by a single Western mainstream news outlet); or as a senior Sunni political figure told me recently, the more than 23,000 detainees in Saudi prisons, a majority of whom (a recent report notes 90%) have degrees (to be fair, Chatham House did comment on this in a recent report that this "is indicative of the prevalence of a niversity education").

    You won't read how Saudi Arabia and Qatar have bullied satellite hosting channels in the region to stop broadcasting "pro-regime" public and private Syrian television channels; or that the Syrian opposition has set up 10 satellite channels, all with an Islamist orientation and which take a strong sectarian line - calling on the FSA to "kill Iran's mice" and "the rats of the Lebanese devil's party" (Hezbollah); or how Russia has been attempting to facilitate a political process of reconciliation with the internal opposition since the onset of the crisis.

    There is clear duplicity in the deliberate unwillingness of the Western mainstream media to acknowledge the nature of those who are the West's allies in the regime-change project - particularly Saudi Arabia and Qatar - and the danger they pose in

  7. #27
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    Part 2

    the region through their arming and firing up of jihadist Salafist groups in Syria and across the region. Rare are articles in the mainstream Western press that highlight this hypocrisy.

    A critical piece in the British press by Peter Oborne, The Daily Telegraph's chief political correspondent, was an exception: "Washington never ceases to complain about the connection between the Pakistani intelligence services and the Taliban. But we never hear a whisper of concern about the connection between Saudi intelligence and Salafi movements across the Middle East, of which al-Qaeda is the best-known offshoot."

    The essential components of what we do see daily in the Western press have changed little during the conflict: in effect, all violence and terror are apportioned to one side only - the Syrian government and its purported "ghostly shadowy" shabiha forces.

    Any violence committed by the "peaceful protesters" and the Free Syrian Army is purely for defensive purposes - all of which comes straight out of the color-revolution/regime-change text book; daily figures for those killed are based almost exclusively on "reports by activists and YouTube footage" (unverifiable, it is claimed, because the Syrian government does not allow free movement of journalists) and are described simply as "people" - dead insurgents do not appear; Al-Qaeda-type jihadist groups are played down (reports in leading media outlets like The Guardian continue to question whether they exist at all); and any weapons or equipment supplied to the "opposition" is, according to Saudi leaders, to help Syrians "defend themselves".

    Embedding journalists on their side is an asset that the FSA, activists and their Western and regional partners have clearly learned from the experience of the US Army in the wake of its attacks on Fallujah in 2004. A US Army intelligence analysis leaked by WikiLeaks revealed that "in the military's opinion, the Western press are part of the US's propaganda operation. This process was facilitated by the embedding of Western reporters in US military units". In their second attack on Fallujah in November 2004, the US Army "got many reporters ... to embed with US troops, so that they could act, as the intelligence report calls for, as the propaganda arm of US forces".

    The fundamental pillar of this Western narrative relies almost exclusively on claims and "evidence" provided by "activists" and opposition-affiliated groups, particularly the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. Are we seriously to believe that this outfit, reportedly run from Coventry by a man who, according to Reuters, part-time runs a clothes shop with his wife, then "sits with a laptop and phones and pieces together accounts of conflict and rights abuses before uploading news to the Internet", is the primary source of daily casualty statistics on the 14-month Syrian conflict - the key geo-strategic conflict of the time?

    It is clearly the front office of a large-scale (dis)information project - when Russian diplomats asked to meet with the organization, they were refused. Senior political figures in the region have told me, as other reports indicate, that the Observatory is in fact funded from a Dubai-based slush fund and is a key component of the regime-change project.

    Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov noted that it was in the opposition's interest "to provoke a humanitarian catastrophe, to get a pretext to demand external interference", so it is not surprising that analysis of the Observatory's figures, including claims of "massacres", consistently show a significant inflation in numbers of casualties, sometimes wildly so.

    As Al-Jazeera journalist Nir Rosen, who spent some months embedded with the Free Syria Army, explained: "Every day the opposition gives a death toll, usually without any explanation of the cause of the deaths. Many ... reported killed are in fact dead opposition fighters, but the cause of their death is hidden and they are described ... as innocent civilians killed by security forces, as if they were all merely protesting or sitting in their homes."

    Analysis I did of what was reported to be the "deadliest day of the nine-month uprising" (December 20, 2011), with the "organized massacre" of a "mass defection" of army deserters widely reported by the international press, and opposition Syrian National Council claims of areas "exposed to large-scale genocide", showed that figures differed so significantly (between 10 and 163 armed insurgents, nine to 111 unarmed civilians and zero to 97 government forces), that the "truth" was impossible to establish. Similarly, analysis of The Guardian's data blog on casualties as of December 2011, based solely on press reports largely from opposition sources, contained basic inaccuracies and made no reference to any killings of armed insurgents during the entire 10-month period.

    So the Observatory and "activists" provide doctored figures, the Western media report these figures uncritically, and the UN provides reports on the basis of opposition and activist sources alone. The December 2011 UN Human Rights Commissioner's report was based solely on interviews with 233 alleged "army defectors"; similarly, the first UN report to accuse the Syrian government of crimes against humanity was based on 369 interviews with "victims and witnesses". The spokesman for the UN Office of the High Commission for Human Rights explained that while "getting evidence from victims and defectors - some who corroborated specific names", the UN "is not in a position to cross-check names and will never be in a position to do that ... The lists are clear - the question is whether we can fully endorse their accuracy."

    British public-service broadcaster Channel 4 has championed the cause of Syrian "video journalists" who it claims are leading a "Syrian media revolution". The channel's foreign-affairs correspondent Jonathan Miller wrote: "Each report is datelined; exact location and date, [which] doesn't in itself necessarily authenticate the report, but combined with other reports from other districts of the same attack filmed from a different location, the reports have the effect of corroborating each other." The channel even made a documentary of activists exaggerating the "truth" - "even if it means embellishing events".

    During the early months of the Syrian conflict, activists like the now-notorious Danny and Khaled Abou Salah were regularly interviewed in the Western media - that is until footage found by the Syrian army in Homs after the attack on insurgents showed them, among other things, preparing child "victims" for interviews and until their "witness statements" lost all credibility. The New York Times' Neil MacFarquhar, reporting from Beirut, almost exclusively bases his reports on "activists speaking by Skype" and "video posted on YouTube".

    Described as "the most horrific video" yet by Britain's Daily Mail, a YouTube clip of an opposition member being "buried alive" was found most likely to be fake. Perhaps more telling than the use of the actual photo by the British Broadcasting Corp of hundreds of body bags from Iraq in 2003 that was used for the story of the al-Houla massacre three weeks ago was the caption beneath the photo: "Photo from Activist. This image - which cannot be independently verified - is believed to show bodies of children in Houla awaiting funeral."

    Nevertheless, activist-supplied videos and statements continue to provide the basis for unquestioned reports in the mainstream press: in the wake of the Houla massacre, for example, The Guardian ran a front-page story - "among the most important of the testimonies" from an army defector reportedly on leave at the time. From his house 300 meters away, the man saw and heard the massacre, despite there being persistent shelling at the time. He claimed to have seen men "he knew to be shabiha "riding into Taldous village in cars, motorbikes and army trucks, shouting: 'Shabiha forever, for your eyes, Assad.'"

    This is not to argue that Syrian security forces and some supporters of the Syrian government have not committed abuses and killings; they have admitted this to be the case. "Don't put me in a position of defending brutality and knifing people," former US national security adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski said about Syria recently. "Frankly that is not the issue. We do know these things happened, and they are horrible. They also happened on a much larger scale in many other countries in which we have not intervened."


    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/NG12Ak02.html

    When will Arab people wake up and overthrow leaders like al Sauds who are complicit with their killers in Tel Aviv and America

  8. #28
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    Syrian Opposition Urges Russia To End Its Support For Assad

    Syria’s main opposition group urged Russia to end its support for President Bashar al-Assad’s government and criticized Russia for deploying naval vessels to the Middle Eastern country.
    “We want a real break between Russia and the current regime,” Burhan Ghalioun, a senior member of the Syrian National Congress and its former leader, said during a news conference in Moscow today after talks between an opposition delegation and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov. “You are still arming a regime that is killing its own people.”

    Russia, which has refused to halt existing weapons sales to Syria, yesterday dispatched 11 military ships to the Mediterranean, some bound for its naval resupply base in the Syrian port of Tartus. Russia’s navy will deploy warships to defend merchant shipping in case of a blockade of Syria, RIA Novosti reported, citing Vyacheslav Dzirkaln, deputy head of the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation.
    Russia and China have blocked United Nations sanctions over Assad’s crackdown on a 17-month uprising in Syria. While Russia won’t publicly abandon support for Assad, it’s trying to pressure the opposition to agree to share power with elements of the current government, said Alexei Malashenko, a Middle East analyst at the Carnegie Moscow Center.
    “Russia understands that Assad’s days are numbered because of the civil war and his steady loss of support,” Malashenko said by phone. “Its main concern is to keep what it can of its influence and preserve face.”
    ‘Clinging to Assad’
    Lavrov today met with a delegation led by Abdulbaset Seida, the Syrian National Council’s new chief, after talks with Michel Kilo, another opposition leader, on July 9. Russia isn’t “clinging” to Assad and Syria should be left to decide his fate, Deputy Foreign Minister Mikhail Bogdanov said yesterday on the ministry’s website.
    The Syrian National Council reiterated demands that Assad step down before it holds any transition talks. Russia has proposed an alternative plan, Seida said after meeting Lavrov, according to the Interfax news service.
    The opposition group accused Russia of souring the atmosphere of today’s talks by timing its naval deployment to coincide with the arrival of the delegation.
    “There’s no doubt that Russia supports the Syrian regime and it’s making a mistake. This encourages the Syrian regime to kill,” said Ghalioun. “It refuses a political solution and is pursuing its military campaign as it knows it has Iran on one side and Moscow on the other.”
    Tehran Talks
    UN envoy Kofi Annan held talks in Tehran yesterday to enlist the help of Iran, another key Assad ally. World powers endorsed a new proposal by Annan on June 30 to establish a transitional government that may include representatives of the opposition and Assad’s administration.
    Russia, which has accused the U.S. and its allies of seeking a forced ouster of Assad similar to the overthrow of Libya’s Muammar Qaddafi last year that cost billions of dollars in Russian contracts, has vowed to prevent the repeat of such a scenario.
    The U.S., France and the U.K. are insisting on a resolution that empowers the Security Council to impose sanctions or authorize military means to enforce its will. Russia opposes such a measure.
    The violence in Syria has claimed more than 17,000 lives, including almost 4,500 members of the security forces, according to Rami Abdel Rahman, head of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights.
    ‘Tacit Support’
    At talks in Damascus on July 9, Assad suggested a solution to end the crisis that involves trying to contain the violence in districts where clashes are particularly extreme and “step- by-step, build up and end the violence across the country,” Annan said yesterday.
    “The likelihood of the Assad regime sticking to the plan remains virtually non-existent and the divisions within the SNC and the wider opposition movement are likely to prevent any potential negotiations from succeeding,” said Jamie Ingram, a London-based Middle East analyst at IHS Global Insight. “Moscow is likely to continue holding a fairly steady line of providing tacit support for Assad.”
    http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-0...r-sharing.html

  9. #29
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    Eyewitness: post-attack Damascus

    Eyewitness: post-attack Damascus

    July 19, 2012

    Damascus residents interviewed by the Voice of Russia correspondent Nawaf Ibrahim [Editor’s note: whose testimonies coincide with the on-the-spot reports from Voltaire Network chairman, Thierry Meyssan].

    What’s going on in the city now? How are you feeling about it?

    Yara Ismail: Generally, life in Damascus is returning to normal after the July 18 blast. People are recovering from fear and desperation they all feel. As for me, I’m a little smitten. But, I’m happy to see that life goes on in the city. Yesterday, we were walking around and saw people eating out in restaurants and cafés, though they were few. I saw people in the markets buying stuff for Ramadan. Nobody stopped going to work or school.

    Muhammad al-Deri: What is really going on in Damascus is that even those who were not physically hurt by the attack are hurt morally. The killed officials were real leaders who fought for Syria and its people. It’s a great loss for us all. Officers who died in the blast were among Syria’s best people. However, the deaths wouldn’t weaken the Syrian army as our ex President Hafez al-Assad created powerful troops indeed, and they comprise top officers.

    Tell us about Bashar Assad. It is true that he can be easily contacted by ordinary people?

    Muhammad al-Deri: Absolutely true. I met him twice being part of youth activists. We don’t perceive him as a president, he is family for us. When one talks to him, Assad behaves friendly and though one understands that he is a president it’s very easy to talk to him. Assad is supported by over 80% of Syrians and he seeks peace by all means as the majority of Syrians do. Thus, we are so grateful to Russia and China for all their efforts to establish a dialogue between the government and the opposition. We are for talks, not weapons.

    Voltaire Network
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  10. #30
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    This is a Syrian matter and those that are interfering from externally are causing the death of innocent Syrians.

    They are trying to create another Libya
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    Syrian carnage sends bloody message

    Jul 21, 2012

    Syrian carnage sends bloody message

    By Victor Kotsev

    The United States-based intelligence analysis organization Stratfor argues that the terror attack in Damascus on Wednesday, which claimed the lives of several top Syrian officials, may have been engineered by the regime of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in order to thwart a coup plot. It also speculates that the closely timed attack against Israeli tourists in Bourghas, Bulgaria, which cost seven lives, may have been an Iranian warning to the West not to be excluded from negotiations over the Syrian transition.

    Whether or not Stratfor's assessment is accurate, these messages of terror add to an incredibly tense confrontation in the Middle East and demonstrate how diverse and far-reaching the consequences of a larger armed conflict could be.

    Fears that Israel would use the occasion to attack Iran directly seem about as exaggerated as speculation that the Syrian army would retaliate against the rebels with chemical weapons. The situation is nevertheless highly volatile. Amid dense war clouds over the Persian Gulf and the Levant, each escalation could trigger responses that lead to the violence easily spiraling out of control.

    Judging from past behavior, there may be more substance to reports that the US and Israel would at some point take out Syrian weapons of mass destruction - Fox News reported that Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak and US Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta discussed this but it is hard to pinpoint any time frame for such an operation. Uncertainty reigns as the proverbial fog of war has fully descended over the Middle East.

    In the Syrian capital Damascus, the rebels have held their own for over five days, and have even advanced considerably: an impressive achievement that suggests either regime in-fighting or a sophisticated foreign-backed intelligence and information warfare campaign (or both). According to reports in the international media, government troops have been firing on Damascus from the surrounding mountains and from helicopters, a sign of increasing frustration and desperation.

    Elsewhere in the country, opposition forces reportedly captured on Thursday several important border crossings between Syria, Turkey, and Iraq. The family of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, if not the president himself, is rumored to have left the capital and sought refuge in the city of Latakia, closer to the bastions of support of its Alawite religious sect.

    In a tense meeting at the United Nations Security Council on Thursday, Russia and China vetoed for the third time a Western draft resolution threatening Syria with sanctions. The vote drew sharp condemnation from the US and other council members.

    "The Security Council has failed utterly in its most important task on its agenda this year," claimed Susan Rice, the US ambassador to the UN. "This is the third time in 10 months that two members have prevented the Security Council from responding with credibility to the Syrian conflict. The first two vetoes were very destructive. This veto is even more dangerous and deplorable."

    The protests of Russian envoy Vitaly Churkin that the West is "biased" ring true, not least after the United States gave advance warning for the "catastrophic assault" (to borrow the words of Secretary of State Clinton) several days before the battles in Damascus started.

    Increasingly less covertly, the West and the Gulf countries have been supporting the Syrian rebels. The latter's successes in the past few days mirror in limited ways the speedy fall of Baghdad in 2003 and of Tripoli in 2011, and suggest heavy intelligence and information warfare that could only come from foreign powers. Based on unconfirmed past reports, even the use of small teams of foreign special forces is not out of question.

    In an alternative (though not necessarily mutually exclusive) scenario, it could be that parts of the regime are collapsing from within, aided by foreign intelligence, and the recent chaos is the result. According to Stratfor's analysis,
    Those targeted in the [Damascus] bombing - Syrian Defense Minister Dawoud Rajha, former Defense Minister Hassan Turkmani, Interior Minister Mohammad al-Shaar, National Security Council chief Hisham Biktyar and Deputy Defense Minister Assef Shawkat (the president's brother-in-law, who was rumored to have been killed by the regime prior to the blast) - were top suspects in a palace coup scenario. The fate of the president's brother Republican Guard and Fourth Division Commander Maher al-Assad after the blast remains a mystery, but his troops are still fighting in and around Damascus and have not shown signs of a breakdown in the army's command and control.

    There are some vague indications that the bombing was a pre-emptive move by the al-Assads to eliminate suspected coup plotters. Whether it was a deliberate action by the al-Assads or a sign of the rebels' effectiveness in penetrating the regime, the bombing is a clear sign that the regime is falling apart.
    Stratfor argues that foreign diplomacy would be more decisive to the outcome of the conflict on the ground than the actions of the rebels, and that Russia's strategy "to prolong the Syrian crisis for a while and thus keep the United States preoccupied" is increasingly failing. "[L]ike everyone else with an interest in Syria, Russia is being pushed into action," the analysis continues.

    Stratfor further predicts that the West will have a hard time shaping "an alternative regime" in Syria, and claims that the bombing in Bulgaria, which happened hours after the attack in Damascus, may have been related.

    "Depending on who the perpetrators were," writes the organization, "the July 18 bus bombing targeting Israeli tourists in Bulgaria and botched attack on Israeli tourists in Cyprus suggest that Iran is relying on its militant arm to intimidate its way into this negotiation by sending the message that the cost of excluding Iran is too high to bear."

    On the latter point, it is important to note that first the Israeli leaders, and more recently an anonymous "senior American official" interviewed by The New York Times, pointed a finger at Iran and Hezbollah for the bloody attack at Bourghas airport in Bulgaria.

    It is certainly possible that there is a link between the two attacks on Wednesday. The Syrian regime has long threatened to attack Israel if cornered, and while firing missiles at Tel Aviv would be suicidal (and Assad may not have reached that stage yet), terrorist attacks shrouded in "plausible deniability" can be used to convey a bloody message. Alternatively, Iran and Hezbollah may have used their networks in order to help negotiate their role in the Assad aftermath. (Once again, in the often-odd logic of Middle Eastern bargaining, these two scenarios are not mutually exclusive).

    For now, however, there are few clues about the identity of the suicide terrorist, his support network and route of infiltration in the country - or even, as a an independent Bulgarian analyst told the Asia Times Online, about the type of explosives used. Initial reports that the attacker was a Swedish national of Algerian descent who had been detained at Guantanamo Bay were subsequently discredited. Claims that Iran and Hezbollah were behind the attack, moreover, can have political and military consequences and can be used for propaganda purposes.

    Similarly, it is too early to call the end of the Assad rule in Syria, even as the country is progressively collapsing into chaos. There is a good deal of redundancy in the Syrian security machine, and if Assad can regain his footing, he may be able to mount a counter-offensive. The ensuing battles threaten to be bloody, and the violence can spill both near and far.

    Victor Kotsev is a journalist and political analyst.

    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/NG21Ak02.html

    There is a danger this could spiral the entire out of control and destabalise the entire ME into chaos

  12. #32
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    How many people will have to die in this stupid evil war? The world can see people dying. Someone must stop this NOW

  13. #33
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aryan_B View Post
    This is a Syrian matter and those that are interfering from externally are causing the death of innocent Syrians.

    They are trying to create another Libya
    It is worse than Libya - this country will be left with a decapitated infrastructure and ripped from piller to piller. So sad to see yet again

  14. #34
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    But they should be careful this has the potential to destabilise the entire ME
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    Member Pickwickian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aryan_B View Post
    This is a Syrian matter and those that are interfering from externally are causing the death of innocent Syrians.

    They are trying to create another Libya
    Syria has no oil so I don't know why they are doing this. I just hope they become the first country to kill all Alqaeda; right now, no one can defeat them.

  16. #36
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
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    It is sad, but Syria is on route to becoming the next Libya.
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  17. #37
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bilalhaider View Post
    It is sad, but Syria is on route to becoming the next Libya.
    Iran next and then Pakistan. Regime change or destabilisation is the wish of the west. Its up to Russia and China where they draw a red line. Syria? Iran?? Pakistan will certainly be too late. Has to be Iran or Syria.

    China and Russia are being hemmed in by these actions of west

  18. #38
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bilalhaider View Post
    It is sad, but Syria is on route to becoming the next Libya.
    Brother - you are wrong --- it will be bigger tragedy. The weapons these rebels have are bigger --- more people die and more people suffer. It will and is big disaster --- thanks to USA Israel France UK and even Saudi --- they all helping this bad situation

  19. #39
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
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    It is alarming that they are blatantly creating unrest to destablize the region and simply remove the leadership - whatever it takes. Perhaps the leadership has faults and needs to be questioned internationally - but simply to carry out the orders of Israel is a crime in itself. More unnecessary deaths - watch this space.

  20. #40
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Turkey deploys ground-to-air missiles to Syrian border

    Turkey deploys ground-to-air missiles to Syrian border

    Published: 22 July, 2012, 21:05




    A train carrying several batteries of missiles and troop carriers has arrived in the southeast Turkish city of Mardin, the Anatolia state news agency reports. The move comes a month after Syria downed a Turkish jet for violating its airspace.

    *The convoy included at least five transport vehicles carrying missiles, according to footage released by the NTV news channel.

    In June, Ankara deployed a number of tanks and military vehicles to the borderline Diyarbakir province, while missile batteries were stationed in the Hatay province to the west of the Syrian border.


    The latest move comes as Syrian rebels reportedly took control of three border posts with Turkey. Some of the fighters believed to be in control of the Bab al-Hawa post claimed allegiance to al-Qaeda, while others identified themselves as members of a group called Shura Taliban.


    The border posts were taken over as part of a rebel offensive against government forces. The brunt of the attack was concentrated on regime strongholds such as Aleppo and Damascus.


    Relations between Turkey and Syria have been worsening since the beginning of the uprising last year. Turkey has been host to a number of meetings between the fragmented Syrian opposition, and Istanbul is the base of the Syrian National Council (SNC), recognized by a number of Western powers as the legitimate representative of the Syrian people.


    Last month, Syria shot down a Turkish F-4 Phantom jet, saying it had violated its airspace. Damascus also offered an apology for the incident and the subsequent death of the two pilots.


    Turkey, however, said the downing of the jet was an act of aggression on Syria’s part, claiming the plane did not cross the border on purpose, and was shot down without warning after flying back into international space. Ankara then called a NATO meeting over the incident. The alliance condemned the incident, but did not take any serious actions against Syria.

    Following the incident, Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan said his government now regarded Syria as a “clear and immanent threat.”

    http://www.rt.com/news/turkey-missil...ia-border-798/

    Countries like Turkey need to be careful in that their minorities could also be supported by a group set up as "friends of Turkey". they need to keep their interference to a minimum

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