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  1. #21
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by wolverine View Post
    Can you please show me article on this , not expected from you to write like this how could just give tag of rapist to whole army

    53 Women aged 13-80 years gang raped by Indian Army:


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  2. #22
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by wolverine View Post
    Who is saying to reply , I have written in context to his reply if he cannot appreciate then he has no right to criticize on this thread, what he has posted has nothing to do with this thread, you tell me if same I would have done on thread related to PA then what would you do , also every army is not perfect there are good points similarly there are leap points.
    If the OP chooses to post a propaganda or a PR thread regarding Indian Army and mentions 10 or so prominent members of the forum, it becomes an open invitation for all members to share their views. Therefor everyone has the right to participate or to ignore the topic.

    One should seriously ask what the purpose is of such attempts to put the adversary in good light in a rival forum. These kind of threads are only good for domestic cinsumption and should be restricted to Indian fora only.
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  3. #23
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    53 Women aged 13-80 years gang raped by Indian Army:


    Amazing and sad. Indian army ought to be a professional well oiled machine. Lets hope for improvement in the future.
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    One thing I have learned from my elders , rather being an army brat is that good Soldiers have great respect for one another , regardless of country ..
    Anyone who gives his life for his country , fights for his country deserves a salute.
    My Maternal grandfather served in Burma in WW2 ( 5th Probyn horse ) with many hindu , sikh soldiers ( many of them went on to join Indian army after partition)
    My mother told me how her Father told her stories of how Muslims , sikhs , hindus fought and died alongside.. bravely ... performing great deeds of valor..
    inshort There are great stories of valor performed by the soldiers..
    I also remember how my elders used to praise the legendary Gorkha regiment of the Indian Army, which many consider one of the best fighters in the world ..

    A handful of centurion and sherman tanks decimated PA's advance in khemkaran (1965) ...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abdul_Hamid_(soldier)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Asal_Uttar

    Indian army is a force to be reckoned with .

    btw I also found this amazing story , it's worth a read
    In 2001, Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal - now 81 years old - felt a strong desire to visit his birthplace at Sargodha, now in Pakistan. At Lahore airport, Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal was met by Brigadier Khawja Mohammad Naser, who took it upon himself to be Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal host and guide. Brigadier Naser really went out of way to ensure that Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal had a satisfying and nostalgic visit to his old house in Sargodha. Upon his return to Lahore he was once again the guest of Brigadier Naser for three days.
    Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal was overwhelmed by the extreme kindness, deference, courtesy and respect bestowed upon him by Brigadier Naser and by all the members of his family and his many servants. However Brigadier Khetarpal felt that something was amiss but could not make out what it was. Was it the long silences that punctuated their animated conversation or was it the look of compassion in the eyes of the women in the family? He could not make out but was sure he was being treated as someone very special.

    Finally, on the last night before Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal's departure, Brigadier Naser said 'Sir, there is something that I wanted to tell you for many years but I did not know how to get through to you. Finally, fate has intervened and sent you to me as an honoured guest. The last few days we have become close to one another and that has made my task even more difficult. It is regarding your son who is, of course, a national hero in India. However on that fateful day, your son and I were soldiers, unknown to one another, fighting for the respect and safety of our respective countries. I regret to tell you that your son died in my hands. Arun's courage was exemplary and he moved his tank with fearless courage and daring, totally unconcerned about his safety. Tank casualties were very high till finally there were just two of us left facing one another. We both fired simultaneously. It was destined that I was to live and he was to die.

    It was only later that I got to know how young he was and who he was.I had all along thought that I would ask your forgiveness, but in telling the story I realize that there is nothing to forgive. Instead I salute your son for what he did at such a young age and I salute you too, because I know how he grew into such a young man. In the end it is character and values that matter."

    Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal was silent as he did not know how to react to be enjoying the hospitality of the person who had killed his son was a confusing feeling. However being a soldier himself he genuinely admired the chivalry of an officer whose complete squadron was decimated by his son.

    Both the Brigadiers retired for the night deep in thought. There are never any victors in war; both sides lose and it is the families that have to PAY the price and suffer the most. As someone once said 'Wars are created by politicians, compounded by bureaucrats and fought by soldiers.'

    The next day photographs were taken and Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal returned to Delhi. Later the photos reached Delhi along with a note from Brigadier Naser that said:
    "With Warmest regards and utmost sincerity, To: Brigadier M.L. Khetarpal, father of Shaheed Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal, PVC, who stood like an insurmountable rock, between the victory and failure, of the counterattack by the 'SPEARHEADS' 13 LANCERS on 16 December 1971 in the battle of "Bara Pind' as we call it and battle of "Basantar" as 17 Poona Horse remembers. --Khawja Mohammad Naser, 13 Lancers, 2 March 2001, Lahore, Pakistan.

    Second Lieutenant Arun Khetarpal, (14 October 1950 – 16 December 1971) born in Pune, Maharashtra, was an officer of the Indian Army and a posthumous recipient of the Param Vir Chakra, India's highest military decoration for valour in face of the enemy. He died in the Battle of Basantar during the Bangladesh war where his actions earned him his honour
    Khetrapal is an iconic figure in the ethos of the Indian Army with prominent constructions being named after him. The parade ground at NDA is named Khetarpal Ground while the auditorium and one of the main gates bear his name an the IMA.

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  5. #25
    Senior Member Red Dragon's Avatar
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    What he posted is a rosy pic of IA, not worth replying.
    The 1962 lessons

    China invaded India in 1962. Though there is a view that the exact date of invasion was October 10, the most acceptable one is October 20, 1962. The war ended on November 19, 1962, following the unilateral Chinese withdrawal. The one-month long war saw India’s humiliation and territorial gains by China. Over the last 50 years, the Chinese have consolidated these gains. In this week’s cover story we have highlighted how a Lt. Colonel in the Indian Army, who later rose to become a Major General, fought the war and was captured by the Chinese as a prisoner of war (POW). I think it is always important to remember past wars if a nation wants to avoid wars in future.

    In 1962, China was not a great military power as it is today. But it still went for a war against India because of three principal reasons. First, there was that tremendous sense of Chinese insecurity in Tibet, particularly after the Dalai Lama crossed over to India and established the government-in-exile to internationalise the issue of China’s illegal occupation of his land and be a rallying force for Tibetans’ resistance against Beijing’s rule inside Tibet. Obviously, China saw (and it continues to see) India as a troublesome factor behind the Tibetan unrest.

    Secondly, the war against India was a diversionary strategy on the part of the then Chinese supremo Mao Zedong, whose politico-economic policy of “The Great Leap Forward” was proving to be a disaster for the Chinese people, thus strengthening his opponents in the Chinese Communists Party such as Liu Shaoqi and Deng Xiaoping. Wars, after all, unite the countrymen like nothing else and if the country comes out victorious, then it strengthens the position of the leader like never before.

    Thirdly, despite China being a communist country, Mao ( and all his successors so far) never gave up the country’s past culture in which the concept of “Middle Kingdom” ( that China is the centre of global civilisation and all the nations must acknowledge its political and cultural supremacy by paying tributes) is deeply ingrained. That means China will not allow any other nation, at least in Asia, to be as important as it is. Obviously, Mao did not like the global attention and importance that India’s then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru was drawing those days. In fact, in a recent Global Times (the publication of the Chinese Communist party) article, a researcher from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences has written, “Mao wanted to wake him (Nehru) up from the superpowers’ influence by giving him a heavy punch, so that he would come to his senses and end the war. War is an extreme means of communication between civilizations” and that “Liu Shaoqi is reported to have told Colombo conference representatives in January 1963 that the Chinese had to show the Indians that China was a great power and, for this reason, had to ‘punish’ India once”.

    What about India’s defeat? In my humble opinion, there were four main reasons. First and foremost was the fact that there was at that time a sense of great ideological arrogance on the part of the Indian leadership, which was highly idealistic, devoid of any sense of ground realities. If Mao believed in the concept of Middle Kingdom, Nehru thought of a world where the militaries should be disbanded. On the other hand, his defence minister Krishna Menon and the dominant faction within the undivided Communist party, the then principal opposition party, were so mesmerised by the philosophy of Communism and Mao’s brand of Communist practices that they could never find any wrong with China, even after 1959 when the Chinese asserted their territorial claim and had a series of systematic and planned incursions into the Indian territory. In fact, they supported the Chinese claims in more senses than one.

    Of course, by 1959 Nehru had realised that his past trust of China was a blunder and decided to strengthen the controversial ‘Forward Policy’, which called for establishing posts in the disputed areas often behind Chinese forward posts and had been continuing since 1954 despite repeated protests by the Chinese Government. Nehru was supremely confident that his policy of nonalignment would prove very effective in getting support from both the United States and the then Soviet Union, thus deterring China from planning any major attack on India. But, as subsequent events proved, Nehru’s was a too utopian worldview.

    Secondly, there was a monumental failure of Indian intelligence in assessing that China was planning a major attack on the country. According to the 1992
    Ministry of Defence’s Official History, Military Intelligence’s assessment in
    1959 was that a “major incursion” by the Chinese was unlikely, given the fact that at that time India’s pace of industrialization was much better than that of China and that Chinese military was not capable enough “to sustain any major drive across the ‘great land barrier’”. The assumption of Chinese in-action in event of crisis was also firmly supported by then Intelligence Bureau Director B N Mullick, who, many argue, was totally incompetent for the job, which he got for his proximity to Krishna Menon. In fact, the IB totally identified itself with the view emanating from the South Block bureaucracy (Ministries of defence and External Affairs) that a limited and high intensity war with China was “structurally impossible” in a nuclearised bipolar system; because any misadventure by China would lead to global nuclear escalation, a spectre that would deter a conflict on the Himalayan border.

    Thirdly, as defence minister Krishna Menon repeatedly ignored the pleas of the Army for funds so as to improve the manpower and weapon systems. For instance, the aforesaid official version behind the 1962 debacle states that: “In the years 1959-1960, LT General S P Thorat, GOC-in-C Eastern Command, had made an appreciation about the magnitude of Chinese threat to Indian borders in the Eastern Sector and had made projections about his requirements to meet that threat. But the Army HQ as well as the Defence Minister paid little heed to Gen Thorat’s appreciation. It was not even brought to the notice of the Prime Minister.” It has been argued by experts that in 1962, “the Indian Army of 280,000 was short by 60,000 files, 700 anti-tank guns, 5,000 radio field sets, thousands of miles of field cable, 36,000 wireless batteries, 10,000 one-ton trucks and 10,000 three-ton trucks! Two regiments of tanks were not operational due to lack of spares. Indian troops were using .303 rifles which had seen action even before World War I (not II). In contrast, Chinese troops were equipped with machine guns/ heavy mortars/ automatic rifles”.

    What was worse that Menon to a greater extent and Nehru to a lesser degree politicised the then Army hierarchy. The then Army Chief, General P N Thapar was a great acolyte of Menon and simply rejected every request for better arms and strategies coming from below. Officers with sound military advice were replaced with those who were submissive and carry out the orders. For instance, the command of the newly formed IV Corps was given to Lieutenant General B M Kaul, who had never commanded an active fighting outfit? His military strategies were highly flawed. So much so that the official history blamed Kaul for frequently ignoring the chain of command. The report accused him of directly approaching the Chief of Army Staff, bypassing the GOC-in-C and also giving orders directly to junior officers, bypassing a chain of middle officers. In fact, the politicisation of the Army was a key factor behind the 1962 debacle.

    Fourthly, another important factor, which many analysts and defence experts believe could have altered the outcome of war, was India’s decision of not using the air force. The Indian Air Force (IAF) was not used for any offensive action and was only confined to air dropping supplies to the troops. In fact, none other than our present chief of the Indian Air Force, Air Chief Marshal NAK Browne , said on October 5 that the outcome of the 1962 war with China would have been different had the Air Force been used in an offensive role. Lamenting that IAF was confined only to provide transport support to the Army, Browne said “these are open and glaring lessons we should have imbibed”.

    Former Air Vice-Marshal A K Tewary, in an article in Indian Defence Review, has said that “in the final analysis, the use of combat air power would have turned the tables on the Chinese and the 1962 war could well have been a debacle for China”. He has blamed the then IB Director B N Mullick for exaggerated assessment of attack by Chinese bombers on Indian cities if India had used the air force.

    Viewed thus, the best lesson that we can learn from our 1962 debacle is that India must never lower its guard and must deploy sufficient military and logistics capabilities to respond to any surprise from the Chinese side. This is particularly so when China is rapidly upgrading its own capabilities and logistics in Tibet. But then war preparedness can never remain static in this age of fast-changing technologies. It is a constant process, which we can ignore only at our peril. And for determining this process, we must give our military the necessary freedom, something that was denied in 1962, leading to disaster.

    http://www.indiandefencereview.com/n...-1962-lessons/

    [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] I have discussed with several friends of mine and come to the conclusion it would probably take 10 days for China to reach Dehli. The reason why it would take so long is because we would want to avoid civilian massacre.
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  6. #26
    Elite Member Agnostic_Indian's Avatar
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    [MENTION=2569]Red Dragon[/MENTION],
    while agree with most of the historical facts, i can't agree with your and your friend's arrogant and delusional conclusion you posted in the end.
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  7. #27
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Dragon View Post
    The 1962 lessons

    [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] I have discussed with several friends of mine and come to the conclusion it would probably take 10 days for China to reach Dehli. The reason why it would take so long is because we would want to avoid civilian massacre.
    What you want to portray from post like this ,this is not war front so keep health environment , you can give facts most of which are correct but what ou have written at last clearly shows your arrogent nature.On the topic if it be possible then why you have not tried every times you were sent back from Indian territory

  8. #28
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    [MENTION=2569]Red Dragon[/MENTION]

    I don't think its in China interest to have a war with India. It should concentrate on continuing to conquer the economic world and have no diversions. Peace is the better option.
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  9. #29
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnostic_Indian View Post
    [MENTION=2569]Red Dragon[/MENTION],
    while agree with most of the historical facts, i can't agree with your and your friend's arrogant and delusional conclusion you posted in the end.
    A war isn't worth thinking about. Would be catastrophe for all, although China would win but the losses would be enormous

  10. #30
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Dragon View Post
    The 1962 lessons

    China invaded India in 1962. Though there is a view that the exact date of invasion was October 10, the most acceptable one is October 20, 1962. The war ended on November 19, 1962, following the unilateral Chinese withdrawal. The one-month long war saw India’s humiliation and territorial gains by China. Over the last 50 years, the Chinese have consolidated these gains. In this week’s cover story we have highlighted how a Lt. Colonel in the Indian Army, who later rose to become a Major General, fought the war and was captured by the Chinese as a prisoner of war (POW). I think it is always important to remember past wars if a nation wants to avoid wars in future.

    In 1962, China was not a great military power as it is today. But it still went for a war against India because of three principal reasons. First, there was that tremendous sense of Chinese insecurity in Tibet, particularly after the Dalai Lama crossed over to India and established the government-in-exile to internationalise the issue of China’s illegal occupation of his land and be a rallying force for Tibetans’ resistance against Beijing’s rule inside Tibet. Obviously, China saw (and it continues to see) India as a troublesome factor behind the Tibetan unrest.

    Secondly, the war against India was a diversionary strategy on the part of the then Chinese supremo Mao Zedong, whose politico-economic policy of “The Great Leap Forward” was proving to be a disaster for the Chinese people, thus strengthening his opponents in the Chinese Communists Party such as Liu Shaoqi and Deng Xiaoping. Wars, after all, unite the countrymen like nothing else and if the country comes out victorious, then it strengthens the position of the leader like never before.

    Thirdly, despite China being a communist country, Mao ( and all his successors so far) never gave up the country’s past culture in which the concept of “Middle Kingdom” ( that China is the centre of global civilisation and all the nations must acknowledge its political and cultural supremacy by paying tributes) is deeply ingrained. That means China will not allow any other nation, at least in Asia, to be as important as it is. Obviously, Mao did not like the global attention and importance that India’s then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru was drawing those days. In fact, in a recent Global Times (the publication of the Chinese Communist party) article, a researcher from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences has written, “Mao wanted to wake him (Nehru) up from the superpowers’ influence by giving him a heavy punch, so that he would come to his senses and end the war. War is an extreme means of communication between civilizations” and that “Liu Shaoqi is reported to have told Colombo conference representatives in January 1963 that the Chinese had to show the Indians that China was a great power and, for this reason, had to ‘punish’ India once”.

    What about India’s defeat? In my humble opinion, there were four main reasons. First and foremost was the fact that there was at that time a sense of great ideological arrogance on the part of the Indian leadership, which was highly idealistic, devoid of any sense of ground realities. If Mao believed in the concept of Middle Kingdom, Nehru thought of a world where the militaries should be disbanded. On the other hand, his defence minister Krishna Menon and the dominant faction within the undivided Communist party, the then principal opposition party, were so mesmerised by the philosophy of Communism and Mao’s brand of Communist practices that they could never find any wrong with China, even after 1959 when the Chinese asserted their territorial claim and had a series of systematic and planned incursions into the Indian territory. In fact, they supported the Chinese claims in more senses than one.

    Of course, by 1959 Nehru had realised that his past trust of China was a blunder and decided to strengthen the controversial ‘Forward Policy’, which called for establishing posts in the disputed areas often behind Chinese forward posts and had been continuing since 1954 despite repeated protests by the Chinese Government. Nehru was supremely confident that his policy of nonalignment would prove very effective in getting support from both the United States and the then Soviet Union, thus deterring China from planning any major attack on India. But, as subsequent events proved, Nehru’s was a too utopian worldview.

    Secondly, there was a monumental failure of Indian intelligence in assessing that China was planning a major attack on the country. According to the 1992
    Ministry of Defence’s Official History, Military Intelligence’s assessment in
    1959 was that a “major incursion” by the Chinese was unlikely, given the fact that at that time India’s pace of industrialization was much better than that of China and that Chinese military was not capable enough “to sustain any major drive across the ‘great land barrier’”. The assumption of Chinese in-action in event of crisis was also firmly supported by then Intelligence Bureau Director B N Mullick, who, many argue, was totally incompetent for the job, which he got for his proximity to Krishna Menon. In fact, the IB totally identified itself with the view emanating from the South Block bureaucracy (Ministries of defence and External Affairs) that a limited and high intensity war with China was “structurally impossible” in a nuclearised bipolar system; because any misadventure by China would lead to global nuclear escalation, a spectre that would deter a conflict on the Himalayan border.

    Thirdly, as defence minister Krishna Menon repeatedly ignored the pleas of the Army for funds so as to improve the manpower and weapon systems. For instance, the aforesaid official version behind the 1962 debacle states that: “In the years 1959-1960, LT General S P Thorat, GOC-in-C Eastern Command, had made an appreciation about the magnitude of Chinese threat to Indian borders in the Eastern Sector and had made projections about his requirements to meet that threat. But the Army HQ as well as the Defence Minister paid little heed to Gen Thorat’s appreciation. It was not even brought to the notice of the Prime Minister.” It has been argued by experts that in 1962, “the Indian Army of 280,000 was short by 60,000 files, 700 anti-tank guns, 5,000 radio field sets, thousands of miles of field cable, 36,000 wireless batteries, 10,000 one-ton trucks and 10,000 three-ton trucks! Two regiments of tanks were not operational due to lack of spares. Indian troops were using .303 rifles which had seen action even before World War I (not II). In contrast, Chinese troops were equipped with machine guns/ heavy mortars/ automatic rifles”.

    What was worse that Menon to a greater extent and Nehru to a lesser degree politicised the then Army hierarchy. The then Army Chief, General P N Thapar was a great acolyte of Menon and simply rejected every request for better arms and strategies coming from below. Officers with sound military advice were replaced with those who were submissive and carry out the orders. For instance, the command of the newly formed IV Corps was given to Lieutenant General B M Kaul, who had never commanded an active fighting outfit? His military strategies were highly flawed. So much so that the official history blamed Kaul for frequently ignoring the chain of command. The report accused him of directly approaching the Chief of Army Staff, bypassing the GOC-in-C and also giving orders directly to junior officers, bypassing a chain of middle officers. In fact, the politicisation of the Army was a key factor behind the 1962 debacle.

    Fourthly, another important factor, which many analysts and defence experts believe could have altered the outcome of war, was India’s decision of not using the air force. The Indian Air Force (IAF) was not used for any offensive action and was only confined to air dropping supplies to the troops. In fact, none other than our present chief of the Indian Air Force, Air Chief Marshal NAK Browne , said on October 5 that the outcome of the 1962 war with China would have been different had the Air Force been used in an offensive role. Lamenting that IAF was confined only to provide transport support to the Army, Browne said “these are open and glaring lessons we should have imbibed”.

    Former Air Vice-Marshal A K Tewary, in an article in Indian Defence Review, has said that “in the final analysis, the use of combat air power would have turned the tables on the Chinese and the 1962 war could well have been a debacle for China”. He has blamed the then IB Director B N Mullick for exaggerated assessment of attack by Chinese bombers on Indian cities if India had used the air force.

    Viewed thus, the best lesson that we can learn from our 1962 debacle is that India must never lower its guard and must deploy sufficient military and logistics capabilities to respond to any surprise from the Chinese side. This is particularly so when China is rapidly upgrading its own capabilities and logistics in Tibet. But then war preparedness can never remain static in this age of fast-changing technologies. It is a constant process, which we can ignore only at our peril. And for determining this process, we must give our military the necessary freedom, something that was denied in 1962, leading to disaster.

    http://www.indiandefencereview.com/n...-1962-lessons/

    [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] I have discussed with several friends of mine and come to the conclusion it would probably take 10 days for China to reach Dehli. The reason why it would take so long is because we would want to avoid civilian massacre.
    1962 was a humiliation for the Indian army. Complete embarrassment. I think it wouldn't be repeated now. With the technology it wouldn't be the same.

  11. #31
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Red Dragon View Post
    The 1962 lessons


    [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] I have discussed with several friends of mine and come to the conclusion it would probably take 10 days for China to reach Dehli. The reason why it would take so long is because we would want to avoid civilian massacre.

    After reading 'chola' and 'nathu la' incident,I find it very hilarious....Are your friends defense strategist or what or might be childish and immature? have u discussed why China couldn't reach sikkim's capital or why couldn't they solved all the border dispute till now,if they are so capable of?Why after disagreeing for decades china has to show Sikkim in its map as Indian territory?You must discuss these things with your friends,kid.

    If u have any other joke, plz bring it on. I'm feeling kinda bored today...Btw,previous one was really hilarious...
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Goku View Post

    After reading 'chola' and 'nathu la' incident,I find it very hilarious....Are your friends defense strategist or what or might be childish and immature? have u discussed why China couldn't reach sikkim's capital or why couldn't they solved all the border dispute till now,if they are so capable of?Why after disagreeing for decades china has to show Sikkim in its map as Indian territory?You must discuss these things with your friends,kid.

    If u have any other joke, plz bring it on. I'm feeling kinda bored today...Btw,previous one was really hilarious...
    I find all this chest thumping by India against China very hilarious. India chest thumping against Pakistan, and Pakistan against India is very stupid as well. But comeon, China has a much superior military than yours, China competes with the US, not India.

  13. #33
    Senior Member Red Dragon's Avatar
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    If the OP chooses to post a propaganda or a PR thread regarding Indian Army and mentions 10 or so prominent members of the forum, it becomes an open invitation for all members to share their views. Therefor everyone has the right to participate or to ignore the topic.

    One should seriously ask what the purpose is of such attempts to put the adversary in good light in a rival forum. These kind of threads are only good for domestic cinsumption and should be restricted to Indian fora only.
    Starting a thread saying Indian army is amazing and delusional. When faults are pointed out then Indian pants get soiled. Do you see Pakistani or China members boasting about their army? Then when you point out the faults, they start crying.
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  14. #34
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by mynameiskhan View Post
    I find all this chest thumping by India against China very hilarious. India chest thumping against Pakistan, and Pakistan against India is very stupid as well. But comeon, China has a much superior military than yours, China competes with the US, not India.
    do u find any controversial point in my quotes or u can't digest those things....Yes,their military is superior than ours but it doesn't mean they can snatch our dignity.I just try to highlight this only with proper factual consistency,not trying to prove that we are superior than them or anybody.
    And India competes with china not pakistan....
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by greencold View Post
    Long way to go before they gain this respect internationally. As [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION] as shown any army that can be responsible for wholesale rape are nothing but scum.
    I think now you have got a lesson because of some sick people you are blaming Indian army , [MENTION=8506]Goku[/MENTION] has shown you the mirror.

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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Goku View Post
    add pakistani army too in your scumbag.Have u forgotten '1971 bangladesh genocide'?? Around 200,000 bangladeshii women were raped that time... [MENTION=50]Neo[/MENTION]




    source:http://www.forbes.com/sites/worldvie...-hide-history/
    400,000 is such a big number
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  18. #38
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by mynameiskhan View Post
    I find all this chest thumping by India against China very hilarious. India chest thumping against Pakistan, and Pakistan against India is very stupid as well. But comeon, China has a much superior military than yours, China competes with the US, not India.
    Here's a list of the 10 most powerful militaries in the world:
    1. USA
    2. Russia
    3. China
    4. India
    5. UK
    6. France
    7. Germany
    8. Turkey
    9. South Korea
    10. Japan
    http://www.globalfirepower.com/
    http://www.globalfirepower.com/countries-listing.asp
    http://www.therichest.com/rich-list/...-in-the-world/
    http://www.businessinsider.in/The-11...w/34126552.cms

    So, China ranks third in the world and India ranks fourth. Yet reading Red Dragon's posts, one would think India was at the bottom of the list and China at the top.

    It would be ridiculous to assume India is competing with China just based on a few posts on a forum, don't you think? And it would be extremely delusional for the Chinese to think history would repeat itself. They may win or not, but that 10 day etc. was hilarious)
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    Dear Lord, this is your expert on Army affairs?? I'll pray for you.
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  20. #40
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: Some amazing facts about Indian Army

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewdrop View Post
    Dear Lord, this is your expert on Army affairs?? I'll pray for you.
    She's Indian mate.
    Writer and activist, Arundhati Roy.
    Continue praying.
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

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