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Thread: US drone strikes in Pakistan

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  1. #621
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    PESHAWAR: At least six people killed and four others were injured in a drone strike in northwestern Pakistan's North Waziristan tribal region on Monday, sources told Dawn.

    More casualties are feared in the attack that targeted a compound in the Shahi Khel area of North Waziristan's Shawwal tehsil.

    Intelligence sources say the drone fired two missiles killing six people. The identity of those killed could not be ascertained.

    The area is off-limits to journalists, making it difficult to independently verify the number and identity of the dead.

    Shawal valley lies on the border of Pakistan's North Waziristan and South Waziristan tribal areas.

    Monday's drone strike comes days after seven suspected militants were killed in a similar attack in Shawal.

    North Waziristan is among Pakistan’s seven tribal districts near the Afghan border which are rife with insurgents and have been strongholds of Taliban and Al Qaeda operatives, among others.

    Pakistan's military in June last year had launched an all-out operation named 'Zarb-i-Azb' against Taliban militants in the region.

    Drone attacks are widely unpopular across Pakistan and according to a survey conducted in June 2013, 66 per cent of the country's citizens oppose these strikes.

  2. #622
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    US drone strike kills seven in North Waziristan



    PESHAWAR: At least seven suspected militants were killed and one other was injured in a US drone strike in the Shawal area of North Waziristan Agency on Wednesday.

    Intelligence sources said the US drone fired two missiles on a compound and a vehicle on the border of North and South Waziristan Agency in Shawal valley.

    The identity of the militants is yet to be ascertained.

    Drone attacks are widely unpopular across Pakistan and according to survey conducted in June last year, 66 per cent of the country's citizens oppose these strikes.

    North Waziristan is among Pakistan’s seven tribal districts near the Afghan border which are rife with insurgents and are alleged to be strongholds of Taliban and Al Qaeda operatives, among others.

    Pakistan's military in June 2014 had launched an all-out operation, named 'Zarb-i-Azb', against Taliban militants in the region.

    The operation was initiated following a brazen militant attack on Karachi's international airport and failure of peace talks between the government and Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) negotiators.

    The offensive has driven out over 800,000 residents from North Waziristan and the army says it has cleared 90 per cent of the tribal region.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1159998/us-...rth-waziristan

  3. #623
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    Good job, US -- give Pakistan real casualty numbers not the cooked up ISPR - eliminate the terrorists in the hundreds
    The Following User Says Thank You to Muse For This Useful Post: Rabzon


  4. #624
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    Drone strike near Pak-Afghan border takes out Hakimullah's aide

    PESHAWAR: A close aide of former Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) Chief Hakimullah Mehsud, Khawrey Mehsud, was killed in a drone strike near the Pak-Afghan border yesterday.

    According to TTP spokesman Muhammad Khorasani, Khawrey Mehsud was killed in a drone attack in Kurram Agency near the Pak-Afghan border on March 18. Two other militants were also killed in the drone attack.

    Khawrey Mehsud was a close aide of former TTP supremo Hakimullah and was said to have taken part in terrorist activities in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

    Kurram is one of the most sensitive tribal areas as it borders three Afghan provinces and at one point was one of the key routes for militant movement across the border.

    The region was claimed by the military to have been cleared of insurgents during an operation a couple of years ago, however, militants still carry out sectarian attacks and also target security forces occasionally.

    Kurram tribal agency is adjacent to North Waziristan region where the operation Zarb-i-Azb is in progress against Taliban and other insurgent groups.

    Drone attacks are widely unpopular across Pakistan and according to survey conducted in June last year, 66 per cent of the country's citizens oppose the strikes.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1170624/dro...kimullahs-aide

  5. #625
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    Drone strike near Khyber border kills nine, including driver of LI chief

    PESHAWAR: At least nine suspected militants, including the driver of Lashkar-i-Islam (LI) chief Mangal Bagh, were killed in a US drone strike in Nazyan district of Afghanistan's Nangarhar province, near the Pak-Afghan border in Khyber Agency.

    Shakir Sipah, a driver of Mangal Bagh who is the chief of the banned LI militant organisation, was among those killed in the drone attack.

    Intelligence sources say that militants belonging to the proscribed Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and LI militants organisations were killed in the strike.

    Read: Lashkar-i-Islam merges into TTP

    Other LI commanders who were killed were identified as Fazal Ameen, Shamat Khan Sipah and Wajid.

    TTP's commanders Yaseen, Zubair , Abdul Rehaman Shinwari and training instructor Zar Wali were also among the dead.

    The sources further said that the unmanned aerial vehicle targeted a suspected militant hideout with two missiles, completely destroying the compound.

    Several people were also wounded in the strike.

    The details could not be independently verified as the access of media personnel is severely restricted in the region.

    The outlawed Lashkar-i-Islam (LI) led by Mangal Bagh had recently merged itself into the Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) under a reorganisation planned by militants.

    The development comes at a time when security forces are making significant gains against militants in military operations in North Waziristan and Khyber Agency which were once considered their strong bastions.

    Khyber is one of Pakistan’s seven semi-autonomous regions governed by tribal laws and lies near the porous Afghan border.

    A military operation titled 'Khyber One' and 'Khyber Two' was launched by security forces and aimed at targeting militants in Khyber Agency, particularly the Tirah Valley of Bara which borders Nazyan.

    The operations in Khyber tribal region were launched amid operation Zarb-i-Azb being conducted by the Pakistan Army in North Waziristan tribal region.

  6. #626
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    Drone strike kills 4 suspected militants in South Waziristan

    PESHAWAR: At least four suspected militants were killed when a US drone fired two missiles at a hideout in South Waziristan tribal region's Shawal area along the Pak-Afghan border on Sunday.

    South Waziristan is among Pakistan’s seven tribal districts near the Afghan border which are rife with homegrown insurgents and are alleged to be strongholds of Taliban and Al Qaeda operatives, among others.

    Also read: Drone strike near Khyber border kills nine, including driver of LI chief

    According to sources, the four killed belonged to the 'Sajna' group of the outlawed Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP).

    The airstrikes come amid the ongoing Khyber- 1 and Khyber- 2 operations launched by the military in Khyber tribal region and are part of the military's stepped-up efforts since a militant attack in December killed 150 people, mostly children, at an army-run school in Peshawar.

    Take a look: Drone strike near Pak-Afghan border takes out Hakimullah's aide

    Military operation Zarb-i-Azb was launched by the Pakistan Army on June 15 following a brazen militant attack on Karachi's international airport and failure of peace talks between the government and Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) negotiators.

  7. #627
    Senior Member ArshadK's Avatar
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    Obama gave CIA more flexibility to strike drones in Pakistan

    Washington: President Barack Obama tightened rules for the U.S. drone program in 2013, but he secretly approved a waiver giving the Central Intelligence Agency more flexibility in Pakistan than anywhere else to strike suspected militants, according to current and former U.S. officials.

    The rules were designed to reduce the risk of civilian casualties. Mr. Obama also required that proposed targets pose an imminent threat to the U.S.—but the waiver exempted the CIA from this standard in Pakistan.

    Last week, the U.S. officials disclosed that two Western hostages, U.S. and Italian aid workers Warren Weinstein and Giovanni Lo Porto, were killed on Jan. 15 by a U.S. drone strike aimed at al Qaeda militants in Pakistan. If the exemption had not been in place for Pakistan, the CIA might have been required to gather more intelligence before that strike.

    And though support for the drone program remains strong across the U.S. government, the killings have renewed a debate within the administration over whether the CIA should now be reined in or meet the tighter standards that apply to drone programs outside of Pakistan.

    Last week, Mr. Obama apologized for the killings and took personal responsibility for the mistake. He called the operation “fully consistent with the guidelines under which we conduct counterterrorism efforts in the region” without specifying what those guidelines are or how they differed from those applied in the rest of the world.

    He also announced a review to ensure that such mistakes aren’t repeated. Current and former officials say many of the changes he called for in 2013 haven’t been implemented or remain works in progress.

    Details about the CIA’s drone program have been shrouded in official secrecy from its inception because it is covert. Seeking to maintain an effective national-security weapon in the face of opposition from within his own party, Mr. Obama in a 2013 speech at the National Defense University spelled out some rules governing drone strikes, which he codified in a “presidential policy guidance” directive.

    Among them were that the threat needed to be imminent and that the U.S. had to have “near-certainty” no civilians would be killed or injured. Officials said the directive also included language aimed at curbing and eventually eliminating a particular type of drone strike in which the U.S. believes an individual is a militant, but doesn’t know his identity.

    These so-called “signature” strikes have been responsible for killing more al Qaeda leadership targets than strikes directly targeting high-value leaders, especially in Pakistan, where the group’s leadership can be difficult to find, current and former U.S. officials said.

    The Jan. 15 strike that killed Messrs. Weinstein and Lo Porto was a signature strike.

    Under a classified addendum to the directive approved by Mr. Obama, however, the CIA’s drone program in Pakistan was exempted from the “imminent threat” requirement, at least until U.S. forces completed their pullout from Afghanistan.

    The exemption in the case of Pakistan means that the CIA can do signature strikes and more targeted drone attacks on militant leaders who have been identified without collecting specific evidence that the target poses an imminent threat to the U.S. Being part of the al Qaeda core in Pakistan is justification enough in the Obama administration’s eyes.

    The CIA still has to meet the near-certainty requirement to avoid civilian casualties in Pakistan, as it does everywhere else it operates.

    A CIA spokesman declined to comment.

    The waiver gave the CIA more flexibility in Pakistan than anywhere else, including Yemen where both the CIA and the U.S. military conduct drone strikes, and Somalia, where the military has its own targeted killing campaign.

    When the U.S. troop presence in Afghanistan was extended, so too was the “imminent threat” waiver, officials said. The administration had initially thought the waiver would expire at the end of 2014 with the withdrawal of most U.S. forces, but Mr. Obama decided to keep U.S. troops in Afghanistan for longer.

    Building a case that a militant poses an “imminent threat” in Pakistan could have required the CIA to undertake additional surveillance before launching a strike, officials said. That could have affected the Jan. 15 operation, these officials said, though it is unclear whether it would have reduced the chances of the hostages being killed.

    Critics within the administration say the CIA has done little to curb the use of signature strikes, although they acknowledge that, despite the January killings, they have become less common and have otherwise resulted in few civilian casualties in recent years.

    “Signatures have been exploited in a way that was not intended,” a senior U.S. official said. “This is where the policy discussions have to go over the next few months.”

    Defenders of the program say the CIA was following guidelines provided by the White House and described the strikes as highly effective. They also say the CIA abided by the requirement concerning civilian casualties even before Mr. Obama issued his directive.

    In the weeks before the Jan. 15 strike that killed Messrs. Weinstein and Lo Porto, CIA drones hovering overhead observed a total of five militants. Drone operators zeroed in on one particular militant whom the CIA concluded was an al Qaeda leader whose identity wasn’t known, according to U.S. officials briefed on the operation.

    Just before the Jan. 15 strike, the CIA saw one of the lower-ranking militants leaving. Three were visible just outside the compound while the al Qaeda leader remained hidden from view inside.

    To track the al Qaeda leader’s movements, and to make sure nobody else was hiding inside the compound, the CIA used the drone’s heat sensors, which can detect the unique heat signature of a human body. These sensors and others are typically used to meet the “near-certainty” standard.

    The only heat signature inside the compound detected before the Jan. 15 strike was of the al Qaeda leader, the officials said.

    After the compound was destroyed, drones overhead watched as six bodies were pulled from the rubble. The heat sensors and other intelligence had showed only four. They didn’t see any evidence at the time to suggest who the two additional bodies were, but didn’t think they were Westerners based on how the bodies were treated after the strike.

    In early February, the U.S. intercepted communications by militants saying two Western hostages had been killed. CIA officials brushed aside suggestions the deaths came from a drone strike, pointing instead to the possibility that a Pakistan military operation might have been the responsible.

    Analysts now believe the hostages were kept underground, either in a basement or an escape tunnel, which is why the heat sensors didn’t detect them before the strike, U.S. officials said.

    The FBI informed the Weinstein family in February that he might be dead but said the U.S. was still investigating, a process which stretched into early April.

    Once U.S. intelligence agencies concluded the drone strike killed the hostages, officials across the government agreed on the need to disclose the mistake. The question was whether to acknowledge the CIA’s role.

    Officials at the CIA, the State Department, the Pentagon and the Justice Department argued against making such a disclosure, warning that doing so could make it difficult if not impossible for the CIA to continue the strikes. Diplomats warned it could reopen a rift with Pakistan, where the government publicly opposes the strikes but security services privately abet them.

    On the other side was Deputy White House National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes and U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power, who argued for disclosing the CIA’s direct role. In meetings at the White House, they argued that Mr. Obama had promised more transparency two years ago and that it was critical to live up to that pledge.

    They received support from the director of National Intelligence, James Clapper, much to the surprise of his counterparts at the CIA and the Pentagon, according to officials involved in the discussions.

    In what turned out to be a key opinion, the Attorney General’s office warned Mr. Obama that publicly disclosing the CIA’s role in this case would undermine the administration’s standing in a series of pending lawsuits challenging its legality.

    Mr. Obama decided to brief the families of the dead in full but to disclose publicly only that Messrs. Weinstein and Lo Porto were killed in a “counterterrorism operation” which took place somewhere along the Afghan-Pakistan border.

    http://nation.com.pk/national/27-Apr...n-us-officials

  8. #628
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    Drones — One white death can change everything

    “Let us kill the people who are trying to kill us,” President Obama has been reported as telling his aides in relation to drone attacks.



    What scores of civilian deaths could not do was easily accomplished by the death of one Warren Weinstein. —DawnNews screengrab

    Indeed, drones have been the darlings of the Obama administration; their remote capabilities and their reputed precision allowing them to claim the heads of a bunch of Al Qaeda and Taliban operatives without ever having to worry about American soldiers returning in caskets.

    Reducing brown bodies in other countries to dots on digital screens, the drone campaign with its 514 hits in Pakistan, Somalia and Yemen has been feted and applauded as no cost killing at its best.


    Then this January came the death of a white, American hostage: Warren Weinstein, an American who was being kept hostage in the tribal areas of Pakistan. In an instant, what had been a near round celebration of remote controlled killing has transformed into calls for an honest investigation of the program.

    The over 2350 drone casualties documented by the Bureau of Investigative Journalism could not provoke the calls for accountability that one white American death has provoked.
    While 38 Westerners have been killed by drone strikes over the past several years; most have been non-white, hence deserving of lesser attention and no analysis.

    So important was the announcement that an American had been accidentally killed by an American drone strike, that it was announced by the American President himself, his tone and body language appropriately apologetic and solemn.

    Following his statement, the view of drones that is visible to the rest of the world was (at least for an instant) made apparent to the public of the country that uses them to kill and never bothers with the details. The New York Times called it a “a devastating acknowledgment for Mr Obama, who had hoped to pioneer a new, more discriminating kind of warfare”.

    With Warren Weinstein’s death: a darling technology, a nifty way to kill others elsewhere, had become questionable, problematic, worthy of reckoning and questioning.

    The realities of places like Pakistan, the demographic changes and internal strife that are a result of drone strikes and security operations, are not visible to far away Americans. Like the bombing of Yemen, the droning of Pakistan is a low-cost way to wage war; its casualties imposing no political cost in global politics.


    Oct 29, 2013: At a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, nine-year-old Nabila Rehman holds a photo with a drawing she made depicting a drone strike that killed her grandmother. — AP
    Just as Yemen appears mysterious and dehumanised, so does Pakistan. The fact that terror attacks and organisations have both proliferated and increased their capacity in the decade of drones also seems to have little or no effect on their use.

    The fact that drones can make mistakes, and do make mistakes that are counted in human lives, is a point that has been made by the death of Warren Weinstein.

    The fact that it could not be noticed until it killed a white American civilian underscores the calculus which says that the losses of certain lives belonging to certain countries are inherently more tragic than the rest.


    Tribesmen sit with Sadaullah Khan (C), a man from North Waziristan, who says he lost both legs and one eye in a drone strike on his house in 2009, as they demonstrate near the parliament house in Islamabad on December 9, 2010. — Reuters
    The value of other innocent civilians – Pakistanis, Yemenis and Somalis – do not register on the indicators of global tragedy determined by these discriminatory mathematics.

    In Pakistan, and at close range, there is no ignoring the devastation, whether it is in the droves of homeless, hapless refugees; the rekindling of ethnic wars; the submerging of a whole country into a darkness borne via remote control.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1178517/dro...nge-everything

  9. #629
    Senior Member Fassi's Avatar
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    Pakistanis see double standard in drone strikes

    ISLAMABAD: People in Pakistan who live under the threat of US drone strikes see a double standard at work in Washington.

    Last week, President Barack Obama took the unusual step of acknowledging and apologising for a highly secret US drone strike that accidentally killed an American and an Italian aid worker held captive by Al Qaeda in Pakistan. The US government said their families would be compensated.

    Know more: Obama apologises for hostage deaths in Pak-Afghan border strike

    Drone strike survivors and family members of innocent Pakistani victims, lawyers and government officials asked why those victims don't also warrant an apology and compensation from the US. They wonder why it takes the deaths of Westerners to bring the controversial drone program back to public debate in the United States.

    Kaleemur Rehman says his grandmother was killed and he and eight other family members were wounded in a US drone strike on Oct 24, 2012 in North Waziristan, once the headquarters of Pakistani and Al Qaeda-linked foreign militants.



    ISLAMABAD: People in Pakistan who live under the threat of US drone strikes see a double standard at work in Washington.

    Last week, President Barack Obama took the unusual step of acknowledging and apologising for a highly secret US drone strike that accidentally killed an American and an Italian aid worker held captive by Al Qaeda in Pakistan. The US government said their families would be compensated.

    Know more: Obama apologises for hostage deaths in Pak-Afghan border strike

    Drone strike survivors and family members of innocent Pakistani victims, lawyers and government officials asked why those victims don't also warrant an apology and compensation from the US. They wonder why it takes the deaths of Westerners to bring the controversial drone program back to public debate in the United States.

    Kaleemur Rehman says his grandmother was killed and he and eight other family members were wounded in a US drone strike on Oct 24, 2012 in North Waziristan, once the headquarters of Pakistani and Al Qaeda-linked foreign militants.
    Kaleemur Rehman tells The Associated Press in Peshawar that his grandmother was killed and nine family members, him included, were wounded in a US drone strike in North Waziristan. — AP

    "My grandmother Mamana Bibi wasn't a militant," he said.

    He says she was working in fields close to her home in her village near Miramshah, the main town in North Waziristan, when she was killed by a missile strike. A second missile struck just as her family rushed out to see what had happened.

    The US is generally secretive about drone strikes, but Obama last week took full responsibility for the January CIA strikes and expressed regret for the deaths of hostages Warren Weinstein, an American, and Giovanni Lo Porto, an Italian.

    Read: Obama gave CIA 'secret waiver' for Pakistan drone strikes: report

    He cast the deaths as a tragic consequence of the special difficulties inherent to the fight against terrorism. Naureen Shah, director of Amnesty International USA's Security and Human Rights program, welcomed Obama's rare public announcement Friday, but said: "Apology and redress should be available for all civilians killed in US drone strikes, not just US citizens and Europeans".

    When asked about apologies or compensation for Pakistani civilians killed by drones, National Security Council spokesman Edward Price said that "in several years of operations, there have been very few cases of civilian casualties, each of which we deeply regret".

    In a statement to The Associated Press, Price said "we believe it is incumbent on us to acknowledge" the deaths of US citizens in overseas counter-terrorism operations. The statement did not address acknowledging the deaths of Pakistani civilians or compensating their families though it said that "the death of innocent civilians, regardless of their citizenship, is something that the US government seeks to avoid if at all possible".

    The number of people, terrorists or innocent civilians, killed in US drone strikes is difficult to tabulate because of the secrecy surrounding the operations.

    Foreign Office spokeswoman Tasnim Aslam told AP: "There are different estimates which put the number around 1,500 dead and thousands injured or maimed."

    "The exact figure of casualties is not known," she added.

    Micah Zenko, a scholar at the Council on Foreign Relations, said that based on averages within the ranges provided by the New America Foundation, the Long War Journal and the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, there have been an estimated 522 US targeted attacks in Pakistan, Yemen and Somalia since Sept 11, 2001, which have killed 3,852 people, of whom 476 were civilians.

    Rehman, whose grandmother was killed 36 months ago, now lives in Peshawar and his uncle Rafiqur Rehman, a schoolteacher, lives with his family in a government-run refugee camp in Bannu after the army launched an offensive in North Waziristan in June.

    The schoolteacher recalled the day when his mother was killed, saying that he was on his way back from a market when he saw people digging a grave.

    "It shocked me," he said. "Some kids playing close to my home shouted that America had killed my mother."

    When he got to his house, he saw his mother lying on a bed. "Her body was torn into pieces," Rehman said.

    He, together with daughter Nabila Rehman and lawyer Shahzad Akbar, traveled to Washington to testify before a congressional committee and urge the Obama administration to investigate Bibi's killing. They returned home unsatisfied, he said.

    Akbar, the lawyer, says he represents families of nearly 50 civilians killed in the US drone strikes, all of them awaiting apologies and compensation. He said the death of the hostages "shows that killing by drones is 'willy-nilly' without any idea of exactly who is being targeted".

    Shaukat Qadir, a retired Pakistan army brigadier general, said he still sees drones as an effective tactic. He notes far more civilian casualties between 2005 and 2008, saying the targeting has been greatly improved thanks to better intelligence on the ground from covert American sources and Pakistani intelligence operatives.

    But retired military officer Mahmood Shah says drone strikes are only adding to the ranks of militant forces.

    "You kill one militant, but many more join up afterward. You're just multiplying the problem, not curbing it," he said.

    Islamabad denies direct involvement in the drone campaign and voiced its "shock and sorrow" over the killing of Weinstein and Lo Porto. It also used the incident to diplomatically complain about the ongoing drone strikes.

    "The death of Mr Weinstein and Mr Lo Porto in a drone strike demonstrates the risk and unintended consequences of the use of this technology that Pakistan has been highlighting for a long time,” the Foreign Ministry had said in a statement.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1179351/pak...-drone-strikes

  10. #630
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    Quote Originally Posted by Fassi View Post
    Pakistanis see double standard in drone strikes

    ISLAMABAD: People in Pakistan who live under the threat of US drone strikes see a double standard at work in Washington.

    Last week, President Barack Obama took the unusual step of acknowledging and apologising for a highly secret US drone strike that accidentally killed an American and an Italian aid worker held captive by Al Qaeda in Pakistan. The US government said their families would be compensated.

    Drone strike survivors and family members of innocent Pakistani victims, lawyers and government officials asked why those victims don't also warrant an apology and compensation from the US. They wonder why it takes the deaths of Westerners to bring the controversial drone program back to public debate in the United States.

    "The death of Mr Weinstein and Mr Lo Porto in a drone strike demonstrates the risk and unintended consequences of the use of this technology that Pakistan has been highlighting for a long time,” the Foreign Ministry had said in a statement.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1179351/pak...-drone-strikes

    And what of those killed in Pakistani drone strikes?? Will the Pakistani govt compensate the "innocent" who find themselves in the company of terrorists and insurgent????

  11. #631
    Senior Member Hope's Avatar
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    According to US, the safety of its citizens is paramount, it doesn't matter to them if innocent people from Pakistan get killed. The sad part of this is, the government of Pakistan is hand in glove with the US, as long as they are getting grants from US they will simply make statements and show helplessness and do nothing more.

  12. #632
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    US drone strike in North Waziristan kills five Uzbek 'militants'

    PESHAWAR: A US drone strike late on Saturday left five suspected militants dead and two others injured in North Waziristan Agency, sources told DawnNews.

    It further said that two missiles were fired that hit two houses in Shawal Tehsil of North Waziristan Agency.

    Meanwhile, official sources claimed that those suspected militants killed in the US drone strike were Uzbek nationals.

    However, their claim could not be verified from independent sources.

    Know more: Senior Afghan militant with IS links 'killed in drone attack'

    North Waziristan is among Pakistan’s seven tribal districts near the Afghan border which are rife with insurgents and have been strongholds of Taliban and Al Qaeda operatives, among others.

    Also read: 7 militants killed in drone strike

    Military in June last year had launched an all-out operation named 'Zarb-i-Azb' against Taliban militants in the region.

    Drone attacks are widely unpopular across Pakistan and according to a survey conducted in June 2013, 66 per cent of the country's citizens oppose these strikes.

  13. #633
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    US drone strike kills four suspected militants in North Waziristan

    At least four suspected militants were killed when a US drone fired missiles at a vehicle in the Shawal area of North Waziristan late on Monday night.

    The unmanned aircraft fired two missiles at the car.

    The identities those killed could not be immediately ascertained, but official sources claimed there were mostly foreigners among those killed.

    On March 16, six suspected militants were killed and two others were injured when a US drone fired two missiles at a house in tehsil Shawal of North Waziristan Agency on Saturday evening.

    Read: Drone attack in North Waziristan kills six, injures two suspected militants

    In April, a report claimed that US President Barak Obama secretly approved a waiver for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) drone programme in Pakistan, doing away with certain requirements that were meant to reduce the risk of civilian deaths.

    According to the Bureau Investigates, between 2,449-3,949 people have been killed in 415 drone strikes in Pakistan since 2004. The last strike as recent as April 12, 2015.

    Of those killed, between 423-962 were civillians and 172-207 were children.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Amjad Hussain For This Useful Post: T-123456


  14. #634
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    At least nine killed in US drone attack in North Waziristan

    PESHAWAR: At least nine suspected militants were killed in a US drone strike in the remote Shawal Valley in Pakistan's North Waziristan tribal region on Saturday.

    According to sources, the drones targeted a house in Shawal's Zoya Saidgai area, which is said to be a hideout of the Afghan Taliban.

    The drones fired two missiles, killing at least nine militants, sources said, adding that all killed in the incident were associated with the Afghan Taliban.

    Also read: North Waziristan questions

    The area is generally off-limits to journalists, making it difficult to independently verify the number and identity of the dead.

    North Waziristan is among Pakistan’s seven tribal districts near the Afghan border which are rife with insurgents and have been strongholds of Taliban and Al Qaeda operatives, among others.

    Military in June last year launched an all-out operation named 'Zarb-i-Azb' against Taliban militants in the region, following which parts of the tribal agency was declared cleared of militants.

  15. #635
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    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    Am making notes at the moment
    Can I take references from these posts?
    Is the info provided correct, accurate by words and figures?
    Kindly answer me !

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    Pakistan Pakistan

    Re: US drone strikes in Pakistan

    Quote Originally Posted by Brilliant View Post
    Am making notes at the moment
    Can I take references from these posts?
    Is the info provided correct, accurate by words and figures?
    Kindly answer me !
    I think you can quote the statements which have a source
    “Pursue one great decisive aim with force and determination.”
    - Carl von Clausewitz

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