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    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Conflict in Yemen

    Saudi Arabia's continuing campaign against al-Qaeda-inspired terrorism has enjoyed considerable success. The atmosphere in the country is noticeably more relaxed than it was a few years ago when the kingdom was buffeted by several major suicide bombings.

    But the arrest earlier this month of eight men accused of plotting terror attacks in Riyadh and Jeddah is proof that the campaign is not over. As one Saudi newspaper editorial put it: "Renewed vigilance is required."

    Of the eight men arrested in the latest sweep, two were Saudis and the other six were Yemenis. There seems little doubt that the terror plot was hatched in Yemen.

    It is well known that al-Qaeda supporters are exploiting the lawlessness in that country to set up bases. But even if order were to be restored to Yemen, Saudi security officials would still need to be vigilant: the war in Syria is giving impetus to al-Qaeda groups there, and energizing jihadists in Iraq.

    Tightening border controls is only part of the solution. Saudi officials know they also have to take steps at home to discourage their own young men from being lured into groups advocating the use of violence in the name of Islam.

    For since the monstrous 9/11 World Trade Centre attacks in 2001 and up to the failed plot in the kingdom earlier this month, a surprising number of Saudi nationals have been associated with terror incidents.

    Trouble on the borders
    The Saudi authorities' attempts to eliminate al-Qaeda, and thereby remove its potential attraction to the kingdom's disaffected young men, have been greatly hindered by developments beyond the country's borders.

    The absence of a strong central government in Yemen has given al-Qaeda, despite frequent US drone attacks, the freedom it has been looking for.

    Furthermore, jihadist leaders are unequivocal about their aims.

    Earlier this year, an Islamist website called on Muslims to "do everything possible to strengthen the jihadist front in Yemen as it serves as a source of back-up and reinforcement for operations in the Land of the Two Mosques [Saudi Arabia]."

    Some Muslims are heeding the call. Just last week, the Yemeni authorities arrested two Egyptians who had entered the country illegally, en route to Saudi Arabia.

    The Saudi government's concern is that the war in Syria and rising sectarian tension in Iraq will provide yet more recruiting and training opportunities for al-Qaeda, creating more threats to the kingdom.

    'New and decent lives'

    The challenge, as ever, will be to convince young Saudis of the folly and danger of attaching themselves to jihadists.
    Many Saudis remain mystified by the apparent appeal of such groups.

    Writing in the daily al-Watan, columnist Yahya al-Amir wondered "why Saudi youth follow calls to jihad, fighting and seeking martyrdom more than anyone else".

    He concluded that changes were needed to religious education in the kingdom, making a clear distinction between Wahhabi Salafi doctrine on the one side, and that of jihadist Salafis advocating violence on the other.

    For example, he said, the concept of jihad was "a vital idea of value in Islam", but had been presented out of context in an absolutist way by jihadists.

    Saudi authorities have made some progress in re-education.

    As another columnist pointed out, "an enlightened attitude to the rehabilitation of those who have been duped into supporting the bigoted ideas of al-Qaeda has led to a small but significant number of captured terrorists rejecting their evil past and seeking to live new and decent lives in society."

    Education challenge

    The problem is that new potential al-Qaeda recruits are emerging each day in the form of disillusioned young Saudis with no jobs and meagre prospects of employment.

    One reason for this is that many job-seekers lack practical skills.

    Saudi Arabia's Deputy Minister of Labour Mofarrej al-Haqbani admitted in a speech last May that the education system was out of step with the demands of the market place.

    "We have to deliver improved standards of training and education. I have to say here that in Saudi Arabia the majority of students after high school turn to study literary and theoretical disciplines", Mr Haqbani said, rather than technical and applied ones. "

    "It is one of our major challenges," he added.

    Schemes providing financial incentives for job-seekers have so far enjoyed only limited success. The same is true of the "Nitaqat" programme that requires all businesses to employ a 30% quota of Saudi nationals.

    Adding to the problem is the prevailing expectation amongst Saudi youth that they should accept nothing less than a comfortable job in the civil service.

    So Saudi Arabia's campaign against al-Qaeda is likely to continue for some considerable time. Only a foolhardy gambler would bet on when stability will return to Yemen, Syria and Iraq - and when every young Saudi has a job.

    BBC News - Saudi Arabia's al-Qaeda challenge

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    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
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    If the violence from the AQAP in Yemen "boils over", it could seriously cause problems for Saudi Arabia. I think the Saudis might be starting to lose their sway over "these people".
    Last edited by bilalhaider; 10th September 2012 at 17:43.

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    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bilalhaider View Post
    If the violence from the AQAP in Yemen "boils over", it could seriously cause problems from Saudi Arabia. I think the Saudis might be starting to lose their sway over "these people".
    Live by the sword die by the sword. They should expect blow back in particular from Syria, That family is very foolish

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    Senior Member Sinbad's Avatar
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    Conflict in Yemen

    The US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has been using a secret drone airbase in Saudi Arabia for the last two years, according to a BBC report.

    The base was established in order to hunt down Al Qaeda members in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), and particularly in Yemen.

    A drone flown from there was used in September 2011 to kill Anwar al-Awlaki, a US-citizen who was alleged to be AQAP’s external operations chief.

    US media have known of the base’s existence since then, but have not reported it.

    Senior government officials had said they were concerned that disclosure would undermine operations against AQAP, as well as potentially damage counter-terrorism collaboration with Saudi Arabia, said the report.

    The US military pulled out virtually all of its troops from Saudi Arabia in 2003, having stationed between 5,000 and 10,000 troops in the Gulf kingdom after the 1991 Gulf war. Only personnel from the United States Military Training Mission (USMTM) officially remain.

    The location of the secret drone base was not revealed in the US reports and the Saudi government has not yet commented.

    However, construction was ordered after a December 2009 cruise missile strike in Yemen, the New York Times reported.

    It was the first strike ordered by the Obama administration, and ended in disaster, with dozens of civilians, including women and children, killed.

    US officials told the newspaper that the first time the CIA used the secret facility was to kill Awlaki.

    Since then, the CIA has been tasked with killing ‘high-value’ targets in Yemen who belong to the AQAP, and who have been determined, by government counsels, to pose a direct threat to the US.

    Three other Americans, including Awlaki’s 16-year-old son, have also been killed in US strikes in Yemen, which can reportedly be carried out without the permission of the country’s government.

    The Washington Post reported that President Barack Obama’s counter-terrorism adviser, John Brennan, a former CIA station chief in Saudi Arabia, played a key role in negotiations with the Saudi government over the base.

    The news that Saudi Arabia was home to a CIA airbase followed the leak of a US Justice Department memo, which provided legal justification for killing US citizens abroad, like Awlaki, who were deemed to pose ‘a direct’ and ‘imminent’ threat to the US.

    Report reveals secret US drone base in Saudi Arabia | World | DAWN.COM

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    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
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    Re: Report reveals secret US drone base in Saudi Arabia

    Wonder if any of these drones are being used in Pakistan?

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    Thumbs up CIA operating drone base in Saudi Arabia, US media reveal

    BBC News - CIA operating drone base in Saudi Arabia, US media reveal
    The US Central Intelligence Agency has been operating a secret airbase for unmanned drones in Saudi Arabia for the past two years.

    The facility was established to hunt for members of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, which is based in Yemen.

    A drone flown from there was used in September 2011 to kill Anwar al-Awlaki, a US-born cleric who was alleged to be AQAP's external operations chief.

    US media have known of its existence since then, but have not reported it.

    Senior government officials had said they were concerned that disclosure would undermine operations against AQAP, as well as potentially damage counter-terrorism collaboration with Saudi Arabia.

    The US military pulled out virtually all of its troops from Saudi Arabia in 2003, having stationed between 5,000 and 10,000 troops in the Gulf kingdom after the 1991 Gulf war. Only personnel from the United States Military Training Mission (USMTM) officially remain.
    'High-value targets'

    The location of the secret drone base was not revealed in the US reports.
    Continue reading the main story
    Analysis
    image of Bill Law Bill Law Gulf analyst, BBC News

    The revelation that US drone strikes against militants in Yemen have been launched from a secret base inside Saudi Arabia will be an embarrassment for the government in Riyadh.

    King Abdullah has embarked upon a gradual process of reform in the face of a conservative religious elite who strongly object to the presence of foreign non-Muslim troops in the country.

    Saudi Arabia is home to Islam's two holiest sites and the deployment of US forces there in the 1990s was seen as an historic betrayal. The campaign for their withdrawal became a rallying cry for al-Qaeda and its late Saudi-born leader, Osama bin Laden.

    However, construction was ordered after a December 2009 cruise missile strike in Yemen, according to the New York Times.

    It was the first strike ordered by the Obama administration, and ended in disaster, with dozens of civilians, including women and children, killed.

    US officials told the newspaper that the first time the CIA used the secret facility was to kill Awlaki.

    Since then, the CIA has been "given the mission of hunting and killing 'high-value targets' in Yemen" - the leaders of AQAP who government lawyers had determined posed a direct threat to the US - the officials added.

    Three other Americans, including Awlaki's 16-year-old son, have also been killed in US strikes in Yemen, which can reportedly be carried out without the permission of the country's government.

    Kristian Coates-Ulrichsen, an expert on Gulf politics at the London School of Economics, told the BBC that Saudi anxieties about the growing threat of AQAP would have been behind the government's decision to allow the US to fly drones from inside the kingdom.

    "The Saudis see AQAP as a very real threat to their domestic security," he said. "They are worried about attacks on their energy infrastructure and on the royal family, so it fit their strategy to allow the drone attacks."

    The existence of the base was likely a "sensitive issue" for both Washington and Riyadh, Mr Coates-Ulrichsen added.

    A source close to the Saudi Interior Minister, Prince Mohammed bin Nayef, declined to comment when contacted by the BBC.

    The Washington Post reported that President Barack Obama's counter-terrorism adviser, John Brennan, a former CIA station chief in Saudi Arabia, played a key role in negotiations with the government in Riyadh over building the drone base.

    Saudi Arabia is home to some of Islam's holiest sites and the deployment of US forces there was seen as a historic betrayal by many Islamists, notably the late leader of al-Qaeda, Osama Bin Laden.

    It was one of the main reasons given by the Saudi-born militant to justify violence against the US and its allies.
    Leaked memo

    The revelation of the drone base came shortly after the leaking of a US justice department memo detailing the Obama administration's case for killing Americans abroad who are accused of being a "senior, operational leader" of al-Qaeda or its allies.
    Anwar al-Awlaki (file) Anwar al-Awlaki was among three Americans killed in drone strikes in Yemen in 2011

    Lethal force is lawful if they are deemed to pose an "imminent threat" and their capture is not feasible, the memo says. The threat does not have to be based on intelligence about a specific attack, since such actions are being "continually" planned by al-Qaeda, it adds.

    NBC News said it was given to members of the US Senate intelligence and judiciary committees as a summary of a classified memo on the targeted killings of US citizens prepared by the justice department.

    The latter memo was written before the drone strike that killed Awlaki.

    Under President Obama, the US has expanded its use of drones to kill hundreds of al-Qaeda suspects in Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen. It says it is acting in self-defence in accordance with international law.

    Critics argue the drone strikes amount to execution without trial and cause many civilian casualties.

    Senators are expected to ask Mr Brennan about drone strikes, the memo and the killing of Awlaki on Thursday when he faces a confirmation hearing on his nomination to become the new CIA director.

  7. #7
    Member Iranzamin's Avatar
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    Re: Report reveals secret US drone base in Saudi Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Superkaif View Post
    Wonder if any of these drones are being used in Pakistan?
    ofcourse, without a doubt. Now when we say that the saud family is in bed with the Americans some muslim might get angry but it is the truth. Wake up people

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    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Re: Report reveals secret US drone base in Saudi Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Iranzamin View Post
    ofcourse, without a doubt. Now when we say that the saud family is in bed with the Americans some muslim might get angry but it is the truth. Wake up people
    Sir we have known this. They are also sponsoring terrorist groups to attack shia in Pakistan. They will get their time very soon as the world is getting familiar with their hatred.

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    Member Iranzamin's Avatar
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    Re: Report reveals secret US drone base in Saudi Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by KingKong View Post
    Sir we have known this. They are also sponsoring terrorist groups to attack shia in Pakistan. They will get their time very soon as the world is getting familiar with their hatred.
    dear brother, my message was meant for those who believe the saud family is all roses and sunshine. ofcourse the sane people know what they are up to. may god protect the innocent shias and all peace loving people

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    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Re: Report reveals secret US drone base in Saudi Arabia

    Quote Originally Posted by Iranzamin View Post
    dear brother, my message was meant for those who believe the saud family is all roses and sunshine. ofcourse the sane people know what they are up to. may god protect the innocent shias and all peace loving people
    In the UK i have come across several Arabs that are connected to the "family". They behave like dogs and out of control. On every occassion they were engrossed and thrilled to be intoxicated and really didnt care how embarrassed they look and behave. I hate their mentality

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    Senior Member Sinbad's Avatar
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    Conflict in Yemen

    Several Saudi-based newspapers reported on Monday that Arwa Baghdadi, a female Saudi national believed to have links with al-Qaeda militants would have fled to Yemen after a court convicted her on terror charges.
    Although a Saudi court established that Arwa had indeed joined up al-Qaeda upon the death of her brother, Mohammed Baghdadi, she was subsequently released back into the family fold, under the strict authority of her father and brother, who became her legal guardians and guarantors of sort.
    Arwa was arrested by the Saudi authorities in December 2010, in Wadi al-Dawasir after she opposed the security sources and appeared as a threat to public order.
    On Monday, Arwa's mother, Huda al-Adhal made a distraught appeal to the press, asking for her daughter who ran away accompanied by her brother, to return home to Saudi Arabia, where she said they would be treated with clemency.

    Al-Hayat newspaper quoted on Monday her mother as saying "The authorities here are tolerant and forgiving. So please come back!"
    Arwa explained that her son informed her of him and Arwa's plan to join Yemen al-Qaeda over a phone call.

    The Saudi authorities are now searching for Arwa and her two children, two-and-a-half-year-old son Osama and four-months old daughter Khadijah, Anas Baghdadi, his wife, Afnan, Mohammed's widow and her four-month-old daughter Huda. (Mohammed Baghdadi died right before Arwa allegedly joined al-Qaeda).

    Family members have appealed to both Arwa and Anas family loyalty, asking them to surrender themselves to the authorities and ask for forgiveness. An uncle, Hesham Baghdadi told the press that the state had shown clemency to repentant terror militants in the past and had even provided them with tools to reintegrate society.

    If indeed it is established that Arwa Baghdadi escaped to Yemen to join al-Qaeda, she would be the thirds female Saudi national to willingly cross the border to follow the terror group.

    Saudi female terror militant escapes to Yemen- Yemen Post English Newspaper Online

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    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Al-Qaeda to the rescue

    Al-Qaeda to the rescue
    By Pepe Escobar

    When the going gets tough, count on the Ministry of Truth to get going.

    The end of Ramadan was imminent. The jihadi chattering classes of that fuzzy entity, al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), went on overdrive. It was jailbreak galore from Libya to Pakistan via Iraq. And all this in perfect synch with two successive fatwas issued by that perennial bogeyman, former Osama bin Laden sidekick Ayman "Doctor Evil" al-Zawahiri.

    Imagine a rushed crisis meeting at the highest levels of the Orwellian/Panopticon complex: "Gentlemen, we have a golden opportunity here. We are under siege by defector spy Edward Snowden - liberated by the Soviets - and that terrorist hack Greenwald. Snowden may be winning: even among US public opinion, there's a growing perception we may be more of a threat than al-Qaeda. So we must show we are vigilantly protecting our freedoms. Yes; we're gonna scream Terra, Terra, Terra!"

    Instantly, we have the closing, with much fanfare, of plenty of US embassies and consulates in the "Muslim world" and a State Department "worldwide" travel alert - soon expanded by Interpol. Confusion ensues - with many trying to figure out whether backpacking in Thailand or eating fresh caviar in Baku is a surefire way of not being blown up.

    Instantly, we also have US and Western corporate media falling in love with the Terra Terra Terra meme all over again. And woe to those who think this has anything to do with Islamophobia. You thought that Terra was gone? No, Terra is omnipresent, omniscient, lurking everywhere. Terra Wants You. Trains and boats and planes - you're nowhere safe.

    Yet the fabulous specific intel unearthed by the Ministry of Truth amounts to some lowlife jihadi boasting on the net that he and his buddies will be doing something nasty someday somewhere in multiple, unspecified locations all across Middle East-Northern Africa (MENA).

    False flag approaching
    A closer examination of these "thousands" of freed al-Qaeda ready to wreak havoc all over the world reveals most may be "our" friends after all.

    The jailbreak in Benghazi (probably 1,000) - does not exactly concern the Friends of NATO of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group variety; their militias are already in power, busy dissolving Libya into perennial failed state status.

    On the double jailbreak in Baghdad (could be as many as 1,400), their destination is across the desert to Syria, to engage in jihad alongside the Friends of Obama/Cameron/Hollande/House of Saud in the combo Jabhat al-Nusra/Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. But wait a minute; if they are "our" friends in Libya and Syria, how come they are our enemies in Pakistan and Yemen?

    In Pakistan (probably 500), they will disperse in the tribal areas and lay low - otherwise they will be droned according to Double O Bama with a license-to-kill list. No alert, by the way, applied to Pakistan (as in the embassy in Islamabad and the consulate in Peshawar, for instance), nor in Indonesia. So it's not the "Muslim world"; it's basically MENA. And specifically Yemen. But Obama last week told the Yemeni president that al-Qaeda was in retreat. So what is it then? AQAP has been de-retreated?

    The bottom line is that the Bush-Obama continuum never ceases to reassure us - not to mention that old fox al-Zawahiri. Doctor Evil, as warped a strategist as he is, figured out a while ago that if the "al-Qaeda" global bogeyman myth is now "stronger than ever" it's thanks to the Obama administration and its poodles, European and Persian Gulf-based, with their Three Stooges strategy from Libya to Syria. Afghanistan is a completely different story; there's no "historical" al-Qaeda left, only a handful in the Pakistani tribal areas.

    So al-Zawahiri knew the bogeyman would inevitably be resurrected, in total synch with his recent fatwas, because "long" - or "infinite" - war equals perpetual funding for the Orwellian/Panopticon complex. And a convenient foreign enemy is essential; no one in Washington could possibly admit on the record the real "enemy", as in strategic competitor, is the Chinese dragon.

    Doctor Evil and the Orwellian/Panopticon complex are on the same side - and that explains why he'll be allowed to be a motor mouth fatwa machine for as long as he wants, and won't be nabbed like some patsy in the underwear bomber mould. The complex is back in offense. Reform the NSA? Interfere with our metadata? What for? We have just alerted the US government to "pre-9/11" levels of terrorist chatter!

    AQAP might well decide not to participate in this worldwide "pre-9/11" script. Real jihadis, after all, are not foolish enough to be caught by XKeystroke. So here's a Dylanesque riddle for you. All along the watchtower, a false flag is approaching - said the joker to the thief. There's too much Terra confusion, and we won't get no relief.

    Pepe Escobar is the author of Globalistan: How the Globalized World is Dissolving into Liquid War (Nimble Books, 2007) and Red Zone Blues: a snapshot of Baghdad during the surge. He has also written Obama does Globalistan (Nimble Books, 2009).

    He may be reached at [email protected].

    http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_...01-050813.html
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    Senior Member Mirza44's Avatar
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    Re: Al-Qaeda to the rescue

    How real is the threat posed by al-Qaeda?
    We examine the connection between a series of prison breaks and the closure of Western embassies across the Middle East.

    http://aje.me/1en70LI

    Interpol has put the world on a security alert, advising its members to increase their vigilance against attacks after a series of prison breaks linked to al-Qaeda in Iraq, Libya and Pakistan. The international police agency said the prison breaks had "led to the escape of hundreds of terrorists and other criminals" over the past month.

    Just a day after the warning, the US announced that it was temporarily closing its embassies across the Middle East and North Africa, saying it had information that al-Qaeda and its allies may increase efforts to attack Western interests this month.

    Lawmakers briefed on the intelligence called the threat among the most serious they had seen in recent years, while General Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the US joint chiefs of staff, said the specific locations and targets were not known, but "the intent is to attack Western, not just US interests".

    Two-hundred-and-forty-eight prisoners escaped from a prison in northwest Pakistan on Monday when a large explosion followed by a series of smaller bombs destroyed the prison's boundary wall. Fighters disguised as policemen carried out the attack using rocket launchers and machine guns.

    Around 45 of those who escaped are considered by the Pakistani government to be particularly dangerous. And while at least 40 have been recaptured, that still leaves the vast majority at large.

    Well I don't think there would be any direct coordination between what has happened in Iraq ... or Niger … or Pakistan, but I think what is common to all of them is the ideology. Particularly in Pakistan we are seeing the emergence of a local al-Qaeda.

    Imtiaz Gul, the head of the Centre for Research and Security Studies

    Earlier, more than 1,100 prisoners escaped from the Al Kuafiya jail in Libya. Again many of the escapees are considered highly dangerous and only a small proportion have been recaptured.

    And days before that al-Qaeda said it had helped as many as 500 inmates break out of Iraq's Abu Ghraib prison in another apparently well-planned attack.

    In all three cases, many of the escapees were hardened fighters linked to armed groups like al-Qaeda, leading Interpol to question whether the breakouts were linked.

    And, despite Barack Obama's declaration that the US will limit the use of drones, nine people were killed in two separate drone strikes in Yemen last week. It is attacks such as these that some argue provide more ammunition for al-Qaeda and its allies.

    So, what do these threats mean for the US and other Western nations? Who is behind the prison breaks and are they coordinated? And is the US really willing to stop drone strikes?

    To discuss this Inside Story, with presenter Mike Hannah, is joined by guests: Will Geddes, a counterterrorism specialist and managing director and founder of security company International Corporate Protection; Imtiaz Gul, the head of the Centre for Research and Security Studies and author of several books on al-Qaeda and tribal ties in Pakistan; Christopher Hill, a former US ambassador to Iraq; and Hakim Almasmari, the editor-in-chief of the Yemen Post.

    "The embassy shut-down is based on some information about a plot against US interests abroad. I do not believe it is necessarily related to these prison breaks … these plots usually take a lot more time to plan and I rather doubt these prison breaks are part and parcel of that."

  14. #14
    Senior Member sami's Avatar
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    Re: Al-Qaeda to the rescue

    Through Saudis funding of Al Qaeda Americans do have some influence

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    Senior Member Alpha1's Avatar
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    Re: Al-Qaeda to the rescue

    Quote Originally Posted by sami View Post
    Through Saudis funding of Al Qaeda Americans do have some influence
    Do you see a diffrence in their aggenda?
    “Pursue one great decisive aim with force and determination.”
    - Carl von Clausewitz

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    Senior Member sami's Avatar
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    Re: Al-Qaeda to the rescue

    Not really they are working together
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    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    U.S. drone kills 13 in Yemen innocent and at a wedding

    SANAA, Yemen — Missiles fired by a U.S. drone slammed into a convoy of vehicles traveling to a wedding party in central Yemen on Thursday, killing at least 13 people, three Yemeni security officials said.

    The officials said the attack occurred in the city of Radda, the capital of Bayda province, and left charred bodies and burnt-out cars on the road. The city, a stronghold of al-Qaeda militants, witnessed deadly clashes early last year as armed tribesmen backed by the military attempted to drive al-Qaeda gunmen out of the city.

    Details on who was killed in Thursday’s strike were not immediately available, and there were conflicting reports about whether militants were traveling with the wedding convoy.

    A military official said initial information indicated that the drone mistook the wedding party for an al-Qaeda convoy. He said tribesmen known to the villagers were among the dead. One of the security officials, however, said al-Qaeda militants were suspected to have been traveling with the convoy.

    The CIA declined to comment on the drone strike. Although the United States acknowledges its drone program in Yemen, it does not usually talk about individual strikes.

    If further investigations determine that all the victims were civilians, the attack could fuel anger against the United States and the government in Sanaa among a Yemeni public already opposed to U.S. drone strikes.

    Civilian deaths have bred resentments on a local level, sometimes undermining U.S. efforts to turn the public against the militants. The backlash in Yemen is still not as large as in Pakistan — but public calls for a halt to drone strikes are starting to emerge.

    The missile attacks in Yemen are part of a U.S.-Yemeni campaign against al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, which Washington has called the most dangerous branch of the global terrorist network.

    Thursday’s drone strike is the second since a car bombing and coordinated assault on Yemen’s military headquarters last week killed 56 people, including foreigners. Al-Qaeda asserted responsibility for that attack, saying it was retaliation for U.S. drone strikes that have killed dozens of the group’s leaders.

    Security forces in the Yemeni capital boosted their presence Thursday, setting up checkpoints across the city and sealing off the road to the president’s residence, in response to what the Interior Ministry called threats of “terrorist plots” targeting vital institutions and government buildings.

    Meanwhile, in Yemen’s restive north, ultraconservative Sunni Muslim militants and rebels belonging to a branch of Shiite Islam battled each other with artillery and machine guns in clashes that killed more than 40 people, security officials said.

    The violence between Salafist fighters and Houthi rebels has raged for weeks in the province of Saada, but the latest sectarian clashes marked an expansion of the fighting to the neighboring province of Hajjah.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/...e34_story.html

  18. #18
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
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    Re: U.S. drone kills 13 in Yemen innocent and at a wedding

    Rest in peace to the innocent. This is the danger of the US shamelessly using these drones for these strikes: they kill innocent people. They also deteriorate security conditions as a result of the blowback. The scary thing is the US deploying these drone strikes throughout the world.

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    Senior Member Wajid47's Avatar
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    Re: U.S. drone kills 13 in Yemen innocent and at a wedding

    Good shooting USA

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    Shiite rebels clash with pro-army tribesmen near Yemen capital‏

    Fierce clashes broke out Saturday between pro-government tribesmen and Shiite Houthi rebels near the Yemeni capital, as the president vowed that authorities will not tolerate any violence.

    The Houthis -- also known as Ansarullah -- have advanced out of their northern mountain strongholds towards the capital in a suspected attempt to expand their sphere of influence as Yemen is reorganized into six regions.

    Clashes using machine guns and medium weapons raged in the villages of Darwan, Bani Maymun, Al-Jaef and Al-Maamar, in the northern town of Hamdan, around 10 kilometers (six miles) from Sanaa International Airport, tribal and army sources said.

    Further north in Amran province, tribal and military sources said that "fierce clashes" pitting troops and Houthi militants raged late Friday.

    The sources spoke of "dozens" of casualties but AFP could not immediately verify the toll.

    Meanwhile, in a speech marking the start of fasting holy Muslim month of Ramadan, President Abdrabuh Mansur Hadi denounced the violence.

    "We will not allow any acts of violence here and there by any party trying to undermine security," Hadi said in a statement carried by the official Saba news agency.

    "All parties must comply with agreements reached to resolve latest tensions and fighting in Amran, Hamdan, Arhab, and Bani Matar" in the north, he said.

    Houthis have been battling the central government for years from their Saada heartland, complaining of marginalization under former president Ali Abdullah Saleh, who stepped down in 2012 after a year-long uprising.

    Clashes erupted anew earlier this month in the north, ending an 11-day truce agreed after mediation backed by United Nations envoy Jamal Benomar.

    The rebels say a federalization plan agreed in February following national talks as part of a political transition would divide Yemen into rich and poor regions.

    They seized areas of Amran province in fighting with tribes in February that killed more than 150 people.

    http://english.alarabiya.net/en/News...n-capital.html
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