Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 113

Thread: The Book thread

Share             
  1. #1
    Lord Of The Ring
    Guest Lord Of The Ring's Avatar

    The Book thread

    Post some of the recent books you have read or are reading or want to read.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Lord Of The Ring For This Useful Post: bilalhaider,sami,Superkaif


  2. #2
    Lord Of The Ring
    Guest Lord Of The Ring's Avatar
    Now it is Ironic I started this thread because I never actually read any book myself.
    I find it very hard to read due to my dyslexia. but I have started to try reading. now a book I recommend everybody to read is the epic of shahnameh by the Persian ferdowsi. This book was written 1023 years ago!

    The Following User Says Thank You to Lord Of The Ring For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,sami,Superkaif

    Last edited by Lord Of The Ring; 8th July 2012 at 17:32.

  3. #3
    Lord Of The Ring
    Guest Lord Of The Ring's Avatar
    Also you NEED to read the poetry by Hafiz,saadi,Rumi.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Lord Of The Ring For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,sami,Superkaif


  4. #4
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Of The Ring View Post
    Also you NEED to read the poetry by Hafiz,saadi,Rumi.
    Excellent idea we will make it a sticky.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Aryan_B For This Useful Post: sami


  5. #5
    Senior Member sami's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,147
    Thanks
    2361
    Pakistan UK
    Personally, I prefer fact books myself, as I like expanding my knowledge, which coincidentally is why I joined this website.

  6. #6
    Lord Of The Ring
    Guest Lord Of The Ring's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by sami View Post
    Personally, I prefer fact books myself, as I like expanding my knowledge, which coincidentally is why I joined this website.
    I am trying to read some university level mechanic book and after 2 pages I stopped
    The Following User Says Thank You to Lord Of The Ring For This Useful Post: sami,Superkaif


  7. #7
    Member Phoenix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    477
    Thanks
    780
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Thats because of the subject of your book i guess!!
    The Following User Says Thank You to Phoenix For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,sami,Superkaif


  8. #8
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    Quote Originally Posted by sami View Post
    Personally, I prefer fact books myself, as I like expanding my knowledge, which coincidentally is why I joined this website.
    A man after my own heart
    The Following User Says Thank You to Aryan_B For This Useful Post: sami


  9. #9
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Leeds, United Kingdom
    Posts
    14,888
    Thanks
    12096
    UK Pakistan
    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Of The Ring View Post
    I am trying to read some university level mechanic book and after 2 pages I stopped
    Bro - i think you deserve a medal to get to page 2 - incredibly hardest subject. The most boring in the world - in my opinion
    The Following User Says Thank You to Superkaif For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,sami


  10. #10
    Member Jihad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Posts
    352
    Thanks
    592
    Pakistan Netherlands
    I've recently bought "The Brothers Karamazov" from Fyodor
    Doestoevsky.
    Doestoevsky can easily be added to the list of great moralists like Karl Marx.

    The Art of War - SunTzu (still haven't read that, shame on me!)

    I used to read alot of books in the past...it had greatly enhanced and improved my vocabulary and imagination! You simply become smarter by reading books..now thats a fact!

    If anyone has some great inspiring books that he/she would like to share, please do so!
    The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Jihad For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail,Aryan_B,sami,Superkaif

    Last edited by Jihad; 9th July 2012 at 01:08.

  11. #11
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Leeds, United Kingdom
    Posts
    14,888
    Thanks
    12096
    UK Pakistan
    Quote Originally Posted by Jihad View Post

    The Art of War - SunTzu (still haven't read that, shame on me!)
    Bro - its a must. Read and enjoy.
    Another book id suggest you read is "Animal Farm" by George Orwell.
    The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Superkaif For This Useful Post: sami


  12. #12
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Animal Farm is a really really great book. What a classic.

    Kane and Abel by Jeffrey Archer, while not a classic, always comes to my mind. Very memorable. Great great book.
    The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,sami


  13. #13
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    Quote Originally Posted by bilalhaider View Post
    Animal Farm is a really really great book. What a classic.

    Kane and Abel by Jeffrey Archer, while not a classic, always comes to my mind. Very memorable. Great great book.
    I liked Kane and Abel.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Aryan_B For This Useful Post: sami


  14. #14
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8,846
    Thanks
    5485
    Pakistan UK
    You guys should read The Soul of a Butterfly...a very good read
    The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to KingKong For This Useful Post: Jihad,Phoenix,sami,Superkaif


  15. #15
    Senior Member sami's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    5,147
    Thanks
    2361
    Pakistan UK
    Once I read an extract from a good book called 'Who can replace a man'. It is a sci-fi novel about men who have programmed some robots to do every day jobs. One day when the careless humans don't send the robots their daily programmings the robots come to the conclusion that they have to replace man (hence the name.) Brilliant book, I reccomend it to all sci fi lovers
    The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to sami For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,just4mano,Phoenix,Superkaif


  16. #16
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    Quote Originally Posted by KingKong View Post
    You guys should read The Soul of a Butterfly...a very good read
    Interesting title what is it about?

  17. #17
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Leeds, United Kingdom
    Posts
    14,888
    Thanks
    12096
    UK Pakistan
    Quote Originally Posted by Aryan_B View Post
    Interesting title what is it about?
    About Mohammad Ali - dance like a butterfly and sting like a bee....

    In The Soul of a Butterfly the great champion takes readers on a spiritual journey through the seasons of life, from childhood to the present, and shares the beliefs that have served him well.



    After fighting some of the fiercest bouts in boxing history, today Muhammad Ali faces his most powerful foe ‚ outside the boxing ring. Like many people, he battles an illness that limits his physical abilities, but as he says, ‚I have gained more than I have lost‚¶I have never had a more powerful voice than I have now.‚ As Ali reflects on his faith and the strength it gave him during his greatest challenge, when he lost the prime years of his boxing career because he would not compromise his beliefs, he describes how his study of Islam has brought him to a greater awareness of life‚s true purpose. As a United Nations‚ Messenger of Peace‚ he has travelled widely, and he describes his 2002 mission to Afghanistan to heighten public awareness of that country‚s desperate situation, as well as his more recent meeting with the Dalai Lama.



    Ali‚s reflections on topics ranging from moral courage to belief in God, to respect for those who differ from us. Written with the assistance of his daughter, Hana, The Soul of a Butterfly is a compassionate and heartfelt book that will provide comfort for our troubled times.

    ‚The most intimate picture yet of The Greatest of them All‚ Sunday Tribune
    The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Superkaif For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail,Phoenix,sami


  18. #18
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    THE TIPPING POINT is the biography of an idea, and the idea is quite simple. It is that many of the problems we face - from crime to teenage delinquency to traffic jams - behave like epidemics. They aren't linear phenomena in the sense that they steadily and predictably change according to the level of effort brought to bear against them. They are capable of sudden and dramatic changes in direction. Years of well-intentioned intervention may have no impact at all, yet the right intervention - at just the right time - can start a cascade of change. Many of the social ills that face us today, in other words, are as inherently volatile as the epidemics that periodically sweep through the human population: little things can cause them to 'tip' at any time and if we want to understand how to confront and solve them we have to understand what those 'Tipping Points' are. In this revolutionary new study, Malcolm Gladwell explores the ramifications of this. Not simply for politicians and policy-makers, his method provides a new way of viewing everyday experience and enables us to develop strategies for everything from raising a child to running a company.
    The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Aryan_B For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail,Phoenix,sami,Third eye


  19. #19
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    Freakonomics (2005) is a groundbreaking collaboration between the economist Steven D. Levitt and the author Stephen J. Dubner. It explores the inner workings of a crack gang, the truth about real estate agents, the secrets of the Ku Klux Klan, and more. It became a worldwide sensation and won several awards.


    Freakonomics

    Which is more dangerous, a gun or a swimming pool? What do schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common? Why do drug dealers still live with their moms? How much do parents really matter? How did the legalization of abortion affect the rate of violent crime? Published in 2005, Freakonomics became an instant worldwide cultural phenomenon, and spent more than two years in hardcover on the N.Y. Times best-seller list. It has sold more than 4 million copies and has been translated into 35 languages.
    Levitt and Dubner followed up with SuperFreakonomics (2009), which carried on the spirit and success of the first book. They also published an illustrated edition of SuperFreakonomics (2010), containing more than 200 photos and illustrations. They may or may not be working on a third book.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Aryan_B For This Useful Post: sami


  20. #20
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    What is Blink about?

    1. What is "Blink" about?

    It's a book about rapid cognition, about the kind of thinking that happens in a blink of an eye. When you meet someone for the first time, or walk into a house you are thinking of buying, or read the first few sentences of a book, your mind takes about two seconds to jump to a series of conclusions. Well, "Blink" is a book about those two seconds, because I think those instant conclusions that we reach are really powerful and really important and, occasionally, really good.

    You could also say that it's a book about intuition, except that I don't like that word. In fact it never appears in "Blink." Intuition strikes me as a concept we use to describe emotional reactions, gut feelings--thoughts and impressions that don't seem entirely rational. But I think that what goes on in that first two seconds is perfectly rational. It's thinking--its just thinking that moves a little faster and operates a little more mysteriously than the kind of deliberate, conscious decision-making that we usually associate with "thinking." In "Blink" I'm trying to understand those two seconds. What is going on inside our heads when we engage in rapid cognition? When are snap judgments good and when are they not? What kinds of things can we do to make our powers of rapid cognition better?

    2. How can thinking that takes place so quickly be at all useful? Don't we make the best decisions when we take the time to carefully evaluate all available and relevant information?

    Certainly that's what we've always been told. We live in a society dedicated to the idea that we're always better off gathering as much information and spending as much time as possible in deliberation. As children, this lesson is drummed into us again and again: haste makes waste, look before you leap, stop and think. But I don't think this is true. There are lots of situations--particularly at times of high pressure and stress--when haste does not make waste, when our snap judgments and first impressions offer a much better means of making sense of the world.

    One of the stories I tell in "Blink" is about the Emergency Room doctors at Cook County Hospital in Chicago. That's the big public hospital in Chicago, and a few years ago they changed the way they diagnosed heart attacks. They instructed their doctors to gather less information on their patients: they encouraged them to zero in on just a few critical pieces of information about patients suffering from chest pain--like blood pressure and the ECG--while ignoring everything else, like the patient's age and weight and medical history. And what happened? Cook County is now one of the best places in the United States at diagnosing chest pain.

    Not surprisingly, it was really hard to convince the physicians at Cook County to go along with the plan, because, like all of us, they were committed to the idea that more information is always better. But I describe lots of cases in "Blink" where that simply isn't true. There's a wonderful phrase in psychology--"the power of thin slicing"--which says that as human beings we are capable of making sense of situations based on the thinnest slice of experience. I have an entire chapter in "Blink" on how unbelievably powerful our thin-slicing skills are. I have to say that I still find some of the examples in that chapter hard to believe.

    3. Where did you get the idea for "Blink"?

    Believe it or not, it's because I decided, a few years ago, to grow my hair long. If you look at the author photo on my last book, "The Tipping Point," you'll see that it used to be cut very short and conservatively. But, on a whim, I let it grow wild, as it had been when I was teenager. Immediately, in very small but significant ways, my life changed. I started getting speeding tickets all the time--and I had never gotten any before. I started getting pulled out of airport security lines for special attention. And one day, while walking along 14th Street in downtown Manhattan, a police van pulled up on the sidewalk, and three officers jumped out. They were looking, it turned out, for a rapist, and the rapist, they said, looked a lot like me. They pulled out the sketch and the description. I looked at it, and pointed out to them as nicely as I could that in fact the rapist looked nothing at all like me. He was much taller, and much heavier, and about fifteen years younger (and, I added, in a largely futile attempt at humor, not nearly as good-looking.) All we had in common was a large head of curly hair. After twenty minutes or so, the officers finally agreed with me, and let me go. On a scale of things, I realize this was a trivial misunderstanding. African-Americans in the United State suffer indignities far worse than this all the time. But what struck me was how even more subtle and absurd the stereotyping was in my case: this wasn't about something really obvious like skin color, or age, or height, or weight. It was just about hair. Something about the first impression created by my hair derailed every other consideration in the hunt for the rapist, and the impression formed in those first two seconds exerted a powerful hold over the officers' thinking over the next twenty minutes. That episode on the street got me thinking about the weird power of first impressions.

    4. But that's an example of a bad case of thin-slicing. The police officers jumped to a conclusion about you that was wrong. Does "Blink" talk about when rapid cognition goes awry?

    Yes. That's a big part of the book as well. I'm very interested in figuring out those kinds of situations where we need to be careful with our powers of rapid cognition. For instance, I have a chapter where I talk a lot about what it means for a man to be tall. I called up several hundred of the Fortune 500 companies in the U.S. and asked them how tall their CEOs were. And the answer is that they are almost all tall. Now that's weird. There is no correlation between height and intelligence, or height and judgment, or height and the ability to motivate and lead people. But for some reason corporations overwhelmingly choose tall people for leadership roles. I think that's an example of bad rapid cognition: there is something going on in the first few seconds of meeting a tall person which makes us predisposed toward thinking of that person as an effective leader, the same way that the police looked at my hair and decided I resembled a criminal. I call this the "Warren Harding Error" (you'll have to read "Blink" to figure out why), and I think we make Warren Harding Errors in all kind of situations-- particularly when it comes to hiring. With "Blink," I'm trying to help people distinguish their good rapid cognition from their bad rapid cognition.

    5. What kind of a book is "Blink"?

    I used to get that question all the time with "The Tipping Point," and I never really had a good answer. The best I could come up with was to say that it was an intellectual adventure story. I would describe "Blink" the same way. There is a lot of psychology in this book. In fact, the core of the book is research from a very new and quite extraordinary field in psychology that hasn't really been written about yet for a general audience. But those ideas are illustrated using stories from literally every corner of society. In just the first four chapters, I discuss, among other things: marriage, World War Two code-breaking, ancient Greek sculpture, New Jersey's best car dealer, Tom Hanks, speed-dating, medical malpractice, how to hit a topspin forehand, and what you can learn from someone by looking around their bedroom. So what does that make "Blink?" Fun, I hope.

    6. What do you want people to take away from "Blink"?

    I guess I just want to get people to take rapid cognition seriously. When it comes to something like dating, we all readily admit to the importance of what happens in the first instant when two people meet. But we won't admit to the importance of what happens in the first two seconds when we talk about what happens when someone encounters a new idea, or when we interview someone for a job, or when a military general has to make a decision in the heat of battle.

    "The Tipping Point" was concerned with grand themes, with figuring out the rules by which social change happens. "Blink" is quite different. It is concerned with the smallest components of our everyday lives--with the content and origin of those instantaneous impressions and conclusions that bubble up whenever we meet a new person, or confront a complex situation, or have to make a decision under conditions of stress. I think its time we paid more attention to those fleeting moments. I think that if we did, it would change the way wars are fought, the kind of products we see on the shelves, the kinds of movies that get made, the way police officers are trained, the way couples are counseled, the way job interviews are conducted and on and on--and if you combine all those little changes together you end up with a different and happier world.

    http://www.gladwell.com/blink/index.html
    The Following User Says Thank You to Aryan_B For This Useful Post: sami


Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Movie thread
    By Lord Of The Ring in forum Art, Music & Entertainment
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 27th June 2013, 10:12
  2. Pakistan's F-16 discussion thread
    By Lord Of The Ring in forum Pakistan Air Force
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 10th September 2012, 09:05
  3. Thread for Longbrained
    By Iranzamin in forum Member Introductions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 26th August 2012, 19:16
  4. Iran Air Forces thread info+pictures!
    By Goebbles in forum Iranian Affairs
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 8th July 2012, 18:42

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Join us on twitter Follow us on twitter