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  1. #41
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Bhowani Junction: A book review

    Bhowani Junction: A book review



    Amongst the numerous books written about the British colonial era in the Indian Subcontinent, we have the well-known classics like A Passage to India by E.M Forster and books by Rudyard Kipling. However, there is a John Masters too, who after being considered at par with Forster, Kipling and many of his other contemporaries who wrote about similar topics as him for a certain period of time, eventually went out of print and thus became an unrecognised, almost unknown author.

    Masters’ novel, Bhowani Junction (1952) is set during the last few years of the British rule in the Indian Subcontinent and the tumultuous atmosphere of those times is incorporated perfectly into the story. The novel is set in a fictional central Indian town of Bhowani which is an important town on the railway network of the surrounding areas. The town boasts a sizeable population of Anglo-Indians, as well as other Indian ethnic groups. As it is a major railway town, it becomes an established centre for commerce, politics and military movement.

    The novel is narrated from the point of view of the three protagonists: Patrick Taylor, an Anglo-Indian young man who is a native of Bhowani and works in the railways, Victoria Jones is another Anglo-Indian from the town who had joined the women’s wing of the military during the Second World War and spent about four years in Delhi. Patrick, being the young, conventional man that he is, considers himself to be Victoria’s boyfriend. Victoria, on the other hand, after living and working in Delhi for the last four years, has changed greatly and she constantly experiences certain ambivalence towards Patrick as she receives a severe jolt of reverse culture shock when she returns to her hometown. Shortly after Victoria returns to the town, a Gurkha regiment headed by Colonel Rodney Savage (the third protagonist) arrives in town. Patrick and Victoria are both required to be working with Col. Savage due to their experience in the railways, and specifically in Victoria’s case for her military experience.

    The interactions between these three characters are set against a backdrop of a turbulent Indian society where different parties are fighting for power which will go to the natives when the British withdraw from India. So accordingly, we have a railways clerk called Ranjit Kasel who is torn between his job where he is technically working for the British and his politically inclined mother, the Sirdarni Sahiba. He is also torn between adopting his religion of birth, Sikhism and remaining secular. His mother, on the other hand, is intent upon immersing herself with her religion and politics which seem to be becoming one and the same thing at certain points throughout the story. Due to their opposing ideologies, there is a simmering conflict between the two. However, one can also sense the underlying compulsion in Ranjit to submit himself to his mother’s wishes as per the Indian culture. Therefore, when we are introduced to Ranjit in the narrative, it is at a point when he is nearer to resolving his inner ideological-cum-identity conflict by submitting to his mother’s wishes. Of course, the fact that the British are about to leave soon enough and then one will have to assert and engage with his or her “Indian” identity is constantly drummed into Ranjit’s mind by his mother and her political associates.

    The action that determines the course of Bhowani Junction’s narrative is, however, based on a slightly different aspect of the political turmoil in the 1940s’ India. Elsewhere in the world, Communism was beginning to spread and it had reached India as well. The British were attempting to have Indian National Congress and/or the Muslim League takeover the country after they left in order to prevent a threat of a takeover conducted by the Communist parties in the country. Masters represents this conflict in his novel through a character called K.P Roy, a “terrorist” with Communist leanings, who does not particularly appear throughout the narrative except once or twice in disguise, which may or may not be apparent to the reader at the first reading. It turns out that Roy is an associate of Ranjit’s mother who is attempting to shield him as he is on the run from the authorities in Bhowani.


    However, the biggest and the most important theme of Master’s novel is the identity crisis of the Anglo-Indians. Victoria and Patrick, the two Anglo-Indian protagonists of the novel, explore their own personal identity as Anglo-Indians through the course of the book, albeit in different ways. This identity crisis of belonging to a mixed race descent creates a strange sort of “reality” for the Anglo-Indians, which, as the term suggests are neither truly British nor Indian. And it is at its lowest point in the novel as the story is set during the months just before the British left India. The community, as portrayed in the novel, is dealing with the additional pressures of the impending socio-political change that is going to occur in the only place that they have ever known as “home” in its truest sense. They have been brought up to hate the natives, who they call wogs, creating a certain sense of superiority within them. But it is shattered when they interact with the British officers and their families as they are suddenly put into a role reversal situation where they become the inferior ones. They begin to feel that they don’t belong to either of the two groups.

    With such complex issues to be discussed, Masters uses each protagonist’s perspective to move the plot forward, without any skipping forwards and backwards within the time frame of the novel. The best part about this technique is that we get useful, in-depth insights into Patrick’s, Victoria and Rodney Savage’s minds. We only see the characters’ own personal perspectives on the events of the novel. There is no involvement of the man called John Masters within the narration, only of Patrick, Victoria and Rodney. Masters flits in and out of these characters’ consciousness so easily that it comes across as a surprise as their mindsets are completely different from each other. Each of these characters is different from each other; their problems, their identity crises all differ from each other, as well as their wishes, hopes, desires and dreams.


    Bhowani Junction is said to be the best, the most famous work by John Masters. Yet, it is one of the most underrated novels of the British colonial and post-colonial era, mainly because the Anglo-Indian community happens to be the main part of the book. This ethnic community has largely remained an ignored subject in post-colonial literature and literary criticism. Even Hollywood imposed its own conventions upon the film adaptation (1956) of Masters’ Bhowani Junction, just like the literary critics did with the novel, by drastically changing the ending of the film version. In the film version, Patrick dies in the climax and Colonel Rodney Savage gets the girl, as it was impossible for Hollywood and its audiences to come to terms with the fact that it was possible for the handsome European officer to actually lose the girl.



    Bhowani Junction: A book review | DAWN.COM
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  2. #42
    Senior Member ManojKumar's Avatar
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    Certainly looks like a cracking books. Thanks for bringing it to our attention mate
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  3. #43
    Member FeKay's Avatar
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    Curre3tly reading 'the-shining' by Stephen king.
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  4. #44
    Member Skull and Bones's Avatar
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    One of the best researched book i'm reading lately.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Mirza44's Avatar
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    I was fond of reading books but in practical life I found it irritating for common matters.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Hope's Avatar
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    With the emergence of the net books are becoming less popular...

  7. #47
    Senior Member sami's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hope View Post
    With the emergence of the net books are becoming less popular...
    Books have their own beauty imo. Just loke radio did not kill newspapers and tv did not kill radio each has its own place
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  8. #48
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
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    This book tells what really happened to Bin Laden

    Book Trailer - Tears of Allah by Rikard Spets - YouTube

  9. #49
    Member Skull and Bones's Avatar
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    Some books in my Tablet.

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  10. #50
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Book tries to explain why Pakistan and India are so different today
    By Our Correspondent
    Published: November 3, 2012

    Dr Tariq Amin-Khan’s work looks at some of the unexplored factors in history۔

    KARACHI: Pakistan and India emerged from an identical colonial past, yet the trajectories the countries followed were very different. In his latest book, ‘Genealogy of Post-Colonial State in India and Pakistan’, Dr Tariq Amin-Khan takes a shot at explaining why this is so.

    India is considered one of the world’s largest democracies where capitalism thrives. Pakistan, however, is thought to be the diametrical opposite, where feudal landholders and bureaucratic elite have a strong grip on state power. Dr Amin-Khan, who is an associate professor at the politics and public administration department of Ryerson University, Toronto, tries to explain this by shedding light on elusive factors which prevailed during the end of the British Raj. Routledge published the book internationally in December 2011 under the title ‘The Post-Colonial State in the Era of Capitalist Globalization’. It has now been published in Pakistan by Vanguard Books. The 249-page book costs Rs995.

    A book launch was held on Thursday evening at The Second Floor (T2F) in which Dr Amin-Khan shared some of the findings of his meticulous research with the audience. “The process of state formation in the post-colonial era is different from the formation of the Western capitalist states,” Dr Amin-Khan told The Express Tribune. In an attempt to explain the difference, Dr Amin-Khan took up India and Pakistan as a case study for his PhD thesis, which after three reviews, eventually culminated in this book. The event started with a candid review by Masood Ali Naqvi, a member of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Pakistan. He said that at first glance, the book did not interest him much but once he started reading, he had great difficulty in putting it down.

    “Amin-Khan’s work is based on hardcore research and a layman might find it difficult to read on the first go,” he said. “But once you get into it, you can’t help but to find it thoroughly interesting.”

    Naqvi presented the crux of Dr Amin-Khan’s thesis by saying most post-colonial states remained dependant on the socioeconomic and political structures that the governing imperialist regimes had created. What determined the particular trajectory of a country, however, was which section of the indigenous society had gained power after decolonisation. “The majority of post-colonial states, either because of dependency or the mindset of ruling classes failed to develop an autonomous political and social framework.”

    Naqvi added that following independence, India stepped into a state-directed development process via industrialisation, ideology of self-reliance and an independent foreign policy. “The focus on the non-aligned state policy from day one had helped India to stay in the path of progress,” said Naqvi.

    Lateef Chaudhry, National Students Federation’s former president, also spoke at the event, declaring the book a “good addition in political literature” on the subcontinent. “Only politically conscious youth can bring a change in society and for that, I urge them to read all sorts of literature.”

    Book tries to explain why Pakistan and India are so different today – The Express Tribune
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  11. #51
    Member Spring's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FeKay View Post
    Curre3tly reading 'the-shining' by Stephen king.
    what do you think of it? i remember being so scared as i read it..i think i only read 2 more books by king, he has one frightening imagination
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  12. #52
    Senior Member ManojKumar's Avatar
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    King is certainly kong! Excellent writer

  13. #53
    Junior Member Meghdut's Avatar
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    Reading Now.
    Last edited by Meghdut; 12th January 2013 at 16:28. Reason: NVM

  14. #54
    Member Ghaznavi's Avatar
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    Found this great book recently, I have just downloaded it, lets hope that I finally get the motivation to start reading again!

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    Here is the download link, the book can be downloaded in 3 parts

    Books Are the Best Partner of Life: Atlas Fatuhat-e-Islamia ( Download pdf )

  15. #55
    Senior Member Wajid47's Avatar
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    Re: The Book thread

    I am a success story: Tehmina Durrani
    By Shayan NaveedPublished: February 16, 2013
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    Tehmina Durrani. PHOTO: AYESHA MIR & ATHAR KHAN/EXPRESS
    KARACHI: Twenty-two years since it was published, Tehmina Durrani’s controversial autobiography still remains relevant in Pakistan today.
    It is no wonder then that ‘My Feudal Lord’ dominated a conversation with the author and activist on day two of the fourth Karachi Literature Festival on Saturday.
    But the oppressed wife of prominent Punjab politican, Mustafa Khar, in the book, stood out on Saturday as, in her own words, a warrior.
    Speaking less about her violent marriage, Durrani chose, instead, to speak about the consequences of writing ‘My Feudal Lord’, which describes how her husband beat her, humiliated her and had an affair with her sibling.
    Her family, who hails from Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa, shunned her for 13 years after the book, which was initially banned in Pakistan, was published.
    “The price (for writing the book) was a severe and lonely one for me,” Durrani said, adding that she had made mammoth enemies as she took on the entire feudal system.
    As her sisters looked on from the front row, Durrani stated how the real consequences were borne by her family, especially her parents.
    “No amount of apologies and gratitude will be enough. My family suffered much more than I did,” she said.
    Durrani added that such bold actions come when one has no support system. While she was left alone to fend for herself, she was “free to become the warrior” that she had become.
    “It’s taken a long time. I don’t think Pakistan was ready for someone like me. But at the same time I got a lot of support.”
    On being labeled an opportunist, Durrani said it was a superficial shying away of something they didn’t like.
    She added that people had, now, accepted her because of her consistency.
    “I was sowing seeds that would sprout later. Everything did take time, but it was this consistency that made me acceptable.”
    After her debut novel, she went on to write a book on Abdul Sattar Edhi, titled, ‘A Mirror to the Blind’, and later, ‘Blasphemy’. Durrani has also been a string advocate of women’s rights in Pakistan and has highlighted many important cases, particularly that of acid attack victim Fakhra Younus.
    Durrani went on to say that her heart would always be with the oppressed, whom she feels she has complete affiliation with.
    She said it was imperative for people to realise how empowered they are. The power, she said, was within herself; she did not inherit it and nobody made it easy for her.
    “I am your best example… I am a success story.”
    Durrani made headlines in 2003 again, when she tied the knot – for the third time – with Punjab Chief Minister Shahbaz Sharif. “What is Shahbaz Sharif like?” moderator Ameena Saiyid asked, as the crowd broke into a controlled chuckle.
    Durrani started off on a light note, saying, “People keep thinking I am going to write another book”; but went on to describe her husband as a “fine man” and a “gift of God”.
    After everything she has been through, Durrani said her standards were high. “I think I married the right man for the people of my country”.
    He married a twice-divorced mother of five, which shows how progressive and liberal he is, she added.
    When Saiyed pointed out that their marriage said a lot about Shahbaz, Durrani was quick to question, “Because he married someone like me?”
    “No,” said Saiyed. “Because he has made you happy.”

    I am a success story: Tehmina Durrani – The Express Tribune

  16. #56
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    Re: The Book thread

    Pakistan, Under Cultural Siege, Is Buoyed by Book Festivals

    Omer Saleem/European Pressphoto Agency
    Book stalls at a literary festival last month in Lahore, Pakistan. Thousands of people crammed into a towering red brick building for the festival, which had the feeling of a rock concert.
    By DECLAN WALSH
    Published: March 6, 2013


    LAHORE, Pakistan — Assailed by jihadist attacks and the moral cudgels of religious conservatives, Lahore’s celebrated cultural vitality has waned somewhat in recent years. A famous kite-flying festival is no more; a performing arts festival vanished after being attacked; and music concerts take place in restricted circumstances.

    The New York Times
    But last month, the city welcomed spring with a raucous new party — a celebration of books.

    Thousands of people crammed into a towering red brick building for the inaugural Lahore Literary Festival, flitting between sessions to hear, and meet, their heroes from Pakistan’s swelling firmament of novelists. It seemed as much a rock concert as a scholarly venue, and scuffles erupted as people pushed to gain entry.

    One star attraction was Mohsin Hamid, a Princeton-educated native of Lahore, whose new novel, “How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia,” has been published to critical acclaim. Wearing jeans and sneakers, he received a giddy welcome from a home crowd. There was swooning. One man stood up to say that he had come to Lahore specifically to emulate the sex and drug scenes in Mr. Hamid’s novels.

    Mr. Hamid was not the only draw: even more esoteric discussions of poetry and writing, or academics cogitating over the country’s troubled trajectory, drew packed houses that surprised even veteran authors.

    “It was very exciting — the first time I’ve seen Beatlemania among literary groupies,” said William Dalrymple, a British historian who participated in several sessions. “Nobody was throwing knickers, but it was a higher degree of hysteria than I’ve ever seen. I felt we were being treated as rock stars.”

    The festival came on the heels of a similarly well-attended literary event in Karachi, Pakistan’s largest city. Put together they tapped into a well of pent-up enthusiasm for cultural and political debate among young Pakistanis, and offered a glowing counterpoint to Pakistan’s more usual image of a country troubled by the forces of extremism.

    “It was a vibrant and intellectual space,” said Faraz Ahmed, a 19-year-old finance student and aspiring author. “I’ve never been to anything like it.”

    Literary festivals are surging in popularity across South Asia. Since the first major event in Jaipur, India, in 2005, 30 other festivals have sprung up across India, with a handful more in Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Nepal. Many test the boundaries of free expression.

    Early this month in Myanmar, where the shackles of military rule are loosening, people flocked to hear Daw Aung San Suu Kyi at a new festival there. Last year controversy erupted at Jaipur after Muslim clerics prevented the author Salman Rushdie from speaking. This year, Jaipur organizers estimated at least 140,000 people attended over five days.

    In Pakistan, the festivals are about more than books — they seek to become part of a national conversation about the direction of the country. Usually, public debate takes place on raucous television chat shows, which critics accuse of framing issues in a confrontational and divisive manner.

    The events at Karachi and Lahore offered a more considered take of the debate, mingling chat about nuclear weapons and the Afghan war with the intricacies of Urdu poetry. Some authors spanned the range: in one session Mohammed Hanif, author of the popular novel “A Case of Exploding Mangos,” discussed extrajudicial executions in western Baluchistan Province; in another he had the audience howling with laughter at his account of describing the imagined anal examination of a former military dictator, Gen. Mohammad Zia ul-Haq.

    With its grand Mughal architecture and elegant colonial-era roads, Lahore is considered the cultural capital of Pakistan, with a thriving Sufi music, art and literary scene. Yet in recent years that vibrancy has been muted, to some degree, by violence.

    A major performing arts festival was bombed by extremists in 2009, and has not taken place since. Basant, the great spring festival in which children fly kites in the streets while adults party on the rooftops, has ostensibly been banned over safety concerns, although some believe that pressure from conservatives also played a part.

    “The excuse of the string was used to appease the conservative religious constituency,” said Najam Sethi, a veteran political commentator.

    The worrisome bout of sectarian bloodshed that has swept Pakistan this year lingered over both festivals. In Lahore, several speakers spoke movingly about the assassination of a Shiite doctor and his son in the city a week earlier. In Karachi, the buoyant mood was tempered by a devastating bomb attack that occurred mid-festival in the western city of Quetta, killing at least 84 Hazara Shiites — a terrible sectarian attack emulated last Sunday in Karachi itself, where a bombing claimed 45 lives in a Shiite neighborhood.

    For all that, the festivals were also a reminder of Pakistan’s considerable success in international literature.

    Intizar Hussain, an 89-year-old Urdu language writer, has been shortlisted for this year’s Man Booker Prize — and for some in the audience, it offered something rare: a chance to celebrate the condition of being Pakistani.

    “You are a source of pride to Pakistan,” one elderly man told Mr. Hamid, the author, to loud applause. “You are sending the message that we are normal people, not terrorists.”

    The festivals faced criticism, too. Critics said the festivals focus too much on English-language literature that is little understood by many of Pakistan’s 190 million people, who largely speak Urdu, Punjabi and other languages. In Lahore, in particular, the crowds largely came from the city’s small upper crust.

    Against that, the sizable crowds — up to 60,000 people between both festivals, according to the organizers — were testament to the growing penetration of English-medium education. While just one percent of Pakistanis were privately schooled in 1975, said Mosharraf Zaidi, head of the education-rights campaign Alif Ailaan, today at least one-third attend nongovernment schools.

    At the lower end of the scale, though, education is in crisis — some 25 million Pakistanis between the ages of 5 and 16 are out of school, Mr. Zaidi added.

    Attention will shift from prose to politics in the coming months, with elections expected in early May, and few believe that a few literary festivals can beat back the Taliban.

    Other forms of culture have taken a battering in recent years — several landmark movie theaters were torched during riots against an American-made film that denigrated the Prophet Muhammad last fall. In a country of mass illiteracy, high literature remains a minority concern.

    Yet, for two weeks in two cities, Pakistan’s book lovers delved into a world of words that, for all its turmoil, offered the chance of a different story.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/07/wo...anted=all&_r=0

  17. #57
    Think Tank 1Badmaash's Avatar
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    Re: The Book thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Of The Ring View Post
    I am trying to read some university level mechanic book and after 2 pages I stopped.
    Classical mechanics or engineering mechanics? It's a beautiful subject if presently properly. The classic is the one by Goldstein but the ones by Hauser and Symon, though pitched at a lower level, are also full of insight. Mechanics is the foundation of European science.

  18. #58
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    Re: The Book thread

    Quote Originally Posted by Jihad View Post
    The Art of War - Sun Tzu (still haven't read that, shame on me!)
    There are several versions floating around. The one that appeals me is the one annotated by James Clavell.

  19. #59
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    Re: The Book thread

    Quote Originally Posted by SpArK View Post
    middle of an old novel by fredrick forsyth called avenger..



    So far so goood...
    His earlier novels -- Day of the Jackal, Odessa File, The Dogs of War -- were riveting and the first was made into an excellent film. His later books, however, ....
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    Re: Bhowani Junction: A book review

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    Bhowani Junction is said to be the best, the most famous work by John Masters.
    Not sure but I think it was the last in a series by Masters covering India. The first was perhaps "Coromandel," which I read back in '74 or '75.
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