Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 113

Thread: The Book thread

Share             
  1. #21
    Member Phoenix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    477
    Thanks
    780
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Three Cups of Tea
    by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin
    Greg Mortenson, ill after a failed mountain climbing attempt in the Karakoram Mountains, rested and recovered in a small Pakistani village. So moved was he by the kindness of villagers there, he vowed to return to build a school. A must read!
    The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Phoenix For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail,Jihad,KingKong,Spring,Superkaif


  2. #22
    Lord Of The Ring
    Guest Lord Of The Ring's Avatar
    Damn it how did I forget the Persian rubaiyat?
    this book is one of the greatest book ever written.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rubaiyat_of_Omar_Khayyam

  3. #23
    Lord Of The Ring
    Guest Lord Of The Ring's Avatar

  4. #24
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    14 Jul 2012 10:15

    The latest cultural headlines in the media.
    Pakistani Persian language expert Arif Naushahi honored in Tehran

    Tehran Times: Iranian and foreign experts on Persian literature gathered in Tehran on Wednesday to pay tribute to the Pakistani Persian language expert, Arif Naushahi.

    The ceremony was organized by the Miras Maktoob Research Center on the sidelines of a conference on Persian manuscripts and printed texts from the subcontinent of India.

    Naushahi, 57, is a Pakistani scholar who specializes in Persian literature. He completed his Ph.D. in Persian language and literature at the University of Tehran in 1993. He is currently the head of the Persian Language Department of Gordon College, Rawalpindi.

    The Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance Mohammad Hosseini made the opening speech followed by unveiling a book about Naushahi’s great efforts in Persian language education in South Asia.

    Scholar Sharif Hussain Qasemi of the University of New Delhi made the next speech, in which he referred to Naushahi’s literary works and said that his books have many readers in the subcontinent of India.

    Moinuddin Aqeel, author, critic and outstanding scholar of Urdu literature and Linguistics from Pakistan also among the invited guests, expressed his happiness over publishing the book and hoped Iran and Pakistan would continue their close cultural relationship.

    Necdet Tosun of Marmara University in Turkey said that Naushahi’s recent book is a comprehensive bibliography for those who want to conduct research on the subcontinent.

    Hasan Anusheh, Mohammad-Hossein Tasbihi and Akbar Sabut were also among the Iranian scholars who delivered speeches at the ceremony.

    Naushahi was the last to speak and paid tribute to Iranian historian scholar and manuscript expert Iraj Afshar (1925- 2011) in a short speech.

    The ceremony was brought to an end with the presentation of a plaque of honor and several gifts to Naushahi.

    Naushahi’s major published works includes “Catalogue of the Persian Manuscripts in the National Museum of Pakistan” “Catalogue of the Persian Manuscripts in Anjuman Taraqqi Urdu in Karachi” and “Catalogue of the Urdu Manuscripts in Ganj Bakhsh Library of Islamabad”.

  5. #25
    Member Jihad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Amsterdam, The Netherlands
    Posts
    352
    Thanks
    592
    Pakistan Netherlands
    Quote Originally Posted by Phoenix View Post
    Three Cups of Tea
    by Greg Mortenson and David Oliver Relin
    Greg Mortenson, ill after a failed mountain climbing attempt in the Karakoram Mountains, rested and recovered in a small Pakistani village. So moved was he by the kindness of villagers there, he vowed to return to build a school. A must read!
    Thank you brother, will definitely check this one out.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Jihad For This Useful Post: Phoenix


  6. #26
    Member Spring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,529
    Thanks
    1805
    Pakistan UK
    Belonging

    I read this book quite afew months ago,its an autobiography about a girl born in england,and how much suffering she endures.
    i have taken a synopsis from the waterstones site,it kinds of sums it up quite well..

    Abandoned by her parents, Sameem Ali spent six and a half years growing up in a childrens home. When she was told that her family wanted to take her back she couldnt wait to start her new life with them. Instead, she returned to a dirty house where she was subjected to endless chores. Her mother began to beat her and her unhappiness drove her to self-harm. So Sameem was excited when she boarded a plane with her mother to visit Pakistan for the first time. It was only after they arrived in her family's village that she realised she wasnt there on holiday. Aged just thirteen, Sameem was forced to marry a complete stranger. When pregnant, two months later, she was made to return to Glasgow where she suffered further abuse from her family. After finding true love, Sameem fled the violence at home and escaped to Manchester with her young son. She believed she had put her horrific experiences behind her, but was unprepared for the consequences of violating her family's honour ...Belonging is the shocking true story of Sameem's struggle to break free from her past and fight back against her upbringing

    Book details
    Format: Hardback 256 pages

    Date of publication: 06/03/2008

    Publisher: John Murray Publishers Ltd

    ISBN: 9780719564604
    The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Spring For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail,Phoenix


  7. #27
    Member Phoenix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    477
    Thanks
    780
    Pakistan Pakistan
    I read this Spring. I hate a wasted childhood full of such traumas and indignities. Children are so innocent and to abuse those who are willing to forgive and are so untainted is absolutely tragic.
    The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Phoenix For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail,Spring


  8. #28
    Member Pickwickian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,227
    Thanks
    1007
    Pakistan UK
    The book I'm currently reading is The Pickwick Papers. Very very dry humour.
    The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Pickwickian For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,Superkaif


  9. #29
    Member Spring's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,529
    Thanks
    1805
    Pakistan UK
    I recently read "Love in the times of cholera" by Gabriel García Márquez..it was an excellent read and i would definetly recommend it.I did try to start another book by the same author "one hundred years of solitude",but just couldn't get into it at all..

  10. #30
    Member Pickwickian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,227
    Thanks
    1007
    Pakistan UK
    Quote Originally Posted by Spring View Post
    I recently read "Love in the times of cholera" by Gabriel García Márquez..it was an excellent read and i would definetly recommend it.I did try to start another book by the same author "one hundred years of solitude",but just couldn't get into it at all..
    I heard she is a good writer, I'll check it out.

  11. #31
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    10,678
    Thanks
    7341
    Pakistan Pakistan
    I read Obamas book. I think his best years are behind him,
    The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Express For This Useful Post: Hope,Neo,Spring


  12. #32
    Member Pickwickian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    1,227
    Thanks
    1007
    Pakistan UK
    Quote Originally Posted by Express View Post
    I read Obamas book. I think his best years are behind him,
    Dead. His best years were before he took office then.

    Bush was pro-Pakistani imo. I like him now
    The Following User Says Thank You to Pickwickian For This Useful Post: Superkaif

    Last edited by Pickwickian; 21st July 2012 at 11:28.

  13. #33
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Leeds, United Kingdom
    Posts
    14,888
    Thanks
    12096
    UK Pakistan
    Hari Kunzru: my hero, Nayantara Saghal

    There are many ways of being a writer, but I have always had a special admiration for those who seem to embody their time and place in some profound way. Nayantara Sahgal was born in 1927, the niece of Jawaharlal Nehru, India's first prime minister. Her mother, Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit, was India's first ambassador to the UN. There are photos of her, as a young girl, standing beside Gandhi as he goes to give a speech. Looking at the photos illustrating her defence of her uncle's political legacy, Jawaharlal Nehru: Civilizing a Savage World, you have the impression of an almost Zelig-like quality. She was in the room as India was transformed from colony, to a non-aligned would-be socialist state, to today's world power.

    One of Sahgal's many admirable qualities is that she has never been blinded by her privilege. When her cousin Indira Gandhi suspended India's constitution in what became known as the Emergency, Sahgal was one of her fiercest critics, publishing a stream of journalism condemning her. Sahgal's scheduled appointment as ambassador to Italy was cancelled and she was threatened in a variety of ways. Her fiction is informed by her politics, particularly the tradition of non-violence. Many of her characters find themselves in situations where personal and political morality become intertwined. In Mistaken Identity, a colonial-era playboy is wrongly accused of being a subversive. In Rich Like Us, two women discover the corruption of their elite social milieu.

    These days, India has moved far away from Nehru's vision. His socialism is condemned for leading to the "licence raj" of excessive bureaucracy and stagnation. The economic boom has given legitimacy to strains of nationalism. Sahgal has emerged as a fierce critic of the corruption that goes along with India's current get-rich-quick culture. In her 80s, she is still a working writer, and an important political voice.

    • Hari Kunzru's Gods Without Men is now out in paperback (Penguin)

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012...yantara-sahgal
    The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Superkaif For This Useful Post: Hope,Pickwickian,Spring


  14. #34
    Member Sania's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    524
    Thanks
    886
    Pakistan UK
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	diary1.jpg 
Views:	7 
Size:	52.2 KB 
ID:	380
    I remember reading this for a school project - I thought it was good but Anne Frank herself really annoyed me and I thought she was rather over confident and personally I didn't like her but the journey that she went through was awful and I dont think anyone, whether nice or not, deserves to be punished in that way for their religion.
    Adolf Hitler was cruel and truly evil.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Sania For This Useful Post: Spring


  15. #35
    Member SpArK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    375
    Thanks
    362
    India India
    middle of an old novel by fredrick forsyth called avenger..



    So far so goood...
    The Following User Says Thank You to SpArK For This Useful Post: Hope


  16. #36
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Utopia
    Posts
    14,322
    Thanks
    8763
    Pakistan England
    Sparky have a look at Freakonomics and blink
    The Following User Says Thank You to Aryan_B For This Useful Post: KRAIT


  17. #37
    Member SpArK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    375
    Thanks
    362
    India India
    Quote Originally Posted by Aryan_B View Post
    Sparky have a look at Freakonomics and blink


    This is next on list.
    The Following User Says Thank You to SpArK For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail


  18. #38
    Senior Member Red Crow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Rawalpindi
    Posts
    2,937
    Thanks
    1065
    Pakistan Pakistan
    I read
    alice's adventures in wonderland
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	carroll.jpg 
Views:	7 
Size:	46.0 KB 
ID:	615
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 200px-GoodbyeMrChips.jpg  
    The Following User Says Thank You to Red Crow For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail


  19. #39
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8,846
    Thanks
    5485
    Pakistan UK
    Guerrilla Lit 101

    West Point's recently released list of the top 10 military classics is replete with doorstop-sized accounts of conflict from ancient to relatively modern times -- but almost completely neglects insurgency, terrorism, and other forms of irregular warfare. The U.S. Military Academy's list does a fine job of capturing the "horizontal" dynamic of clashes of roughly equal great powers armed with the most advanced weapons. But the history and shape of the world system have been just as influenced by the "vertical" axis -- the unequal struggles that have seen guerrillas, bandits, and commandos waging "wars of the knife" against empires and nations. And it is this latter mode of conflict that has dominated world affairs for the past half-century -- and will likely do so for at least a century to come.

    With this in mind, let me supplement the West Point list. For those drawn to West Point's recommendation to read Thucydides, I suggest taking a look also at Sallust's The Jugurthine War. Jugurtha of Numidia (today's northern Algeria) fought a bitter guerrilla war against Rome, some 50 years before Julius Caesar's great campaigns, that Sallust captured with verve. He also spoke to the corruption of Roman character that came with protracted exposure to this kind of fighting.

    Hans Delbrück, whose four-volume history of ancient, medieval, and early modern warfare that West Point selected, can be nicely complemented by Lt. Gen. John Bagot Glubb's The Great Arab Conquests. His survey of the sweeping seventh-century victories of Muslim warriors is of the highest analytic and literary quality, a principal observation being that much of the world of that time was shaped by the irregular "pirate strategy" the Arabs adopted. That is, they used the desert as an ocean and came raiding from it, again and again, with startling success.

    The West Point list also focuses on several important philosophers of war: the aphoristic Sun Tzu; the turgid, elusive treatises of Machiavelli and Clausewitz; and Jomini's geometrically inspired principles. Jomini in particular, with his emphasis on angles of approach and other seemingly precise formulas, captured the minds of generations of military leaders. His ideas about how to properly mass one's forces and take the offensive remain powerfully prominent in -- if not especially useful to -- current U.S. strategic thought. Irregular philosophers of war are, by comparison, few. Mao Zedong is certainly the best, though his On Guerrilla Warfare is very nearly as vague as Sun Tzu. Yet Mao's key insight for irregulars -- centralize strategy, decentralize operations -- is still the polestar.

    For a more operationally oriented study of land battles, West Point chose Ardant du Picq's Battle Studies. This is a curious choice. Col. du Picq was killed in the Franco-Prussian War, but his belief that good morale could overcome concentrated firepower animated French strategic thought up to and during World War I -- with near-catastrophic results. For the period in question, I suggest two alternatives. First, there is Col. Charles Callwell's survey of the many modes of irregular warfare, Small Wars -- find the third edition, the one with the insightful introduction by eminent military historian Douglas Porch. The second book is by John Reed -- also the author of Ten Days That Shook the World about the Russian Revolution -- whose account of Pancho Villa in Insurgent Mexico is one of the finest eyewitness accounts of an insurgent campaign ever written, even taking into account T.E. Lawrence's Seven Pillars of Wisdom.
    Interestingly, the West Point list also includes two naval classics, one each from Britain's Julian Corbett and American A.T. Mahan. They are without question the best in their field, but the works chosen hardly speak to the phenomenon of raiding from the sea -- the principal way of waging maritime irregular warfare. Handily, however, both Corbett and Mahan did write about such matters, the former in his depiction of the life (and value as a sea raider) of Francis Drake and the latter in his Types of Naval Officers, particularly the character study of Edward Pellew.

    When it comes to air power, West Point opted for Italian strategist Giulio Douhet's The Command of the Air. First published in 1921, the book called for massive bombing of civilian targets -- with chemical weapons. Douhet's belief in the profound psychological effect of aerial attack attracted legions of followers -- and still does. Yet few such campaigns have ever worked. Better to look at "air raiding" through more irregular eyes, such as those of Orde Wingate. This British general pioneered the concept of "deep penetration" of small raiding forces, inserted and supplied from the air. It is a concept he tried out with some success in Burma during World War II, but his ideas still await full development. Leonard Mosley's Gideon Goes to War -- Wingate was something of a religious fanatic and saw himself much like the biblical warrior -- offers a lucid, but still deep, assessment.

    For those counting, you know that I have two choices left. I'll conclude with recommendations that reflect an important debate. Robert Taber's War of the Flea argues that little can stop the weak from wearing down the strong with insurgent warfare; Lewis Gann's Guerrillas in History is a brief but thorough survey that shows how often irregulars have been beaten in the past. Both books were written over 40 years ago, and both remain exceptionally timely. Indeed, Abu Musab al-Suri, al Qaeda's deepest strategic thinker, lectured on Taber at the "university of terror" that used to operate in Afghanistan.

    The 10 books I have outlined here -- all quite short save for Glubb and Callwell -- provide nice complements to the West Point list and may prove a bit more relevant to the wars of our time and conflicts to come.

    Guerrilla Lit 101 - By John Arquilla | Foreign Policy
    The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to KingKong For This Useful Post: Ahsan Bin Tufail,Express


  20. #40
    Member Inny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Kirklees
    Posts
    217
    Thanks
    83
    UK England
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Book-of-the-day-010.jpg 
Views:	5 
Size:	82.8 KB 
ID:	976

    Book i'm reading on public transport

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Movie thread
    By Lord Of The Ring in forum Art, Music & Entertainment
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 27th June 2013, 10:12
  2. Pakistan's F-16 discussion thread
    By Lord Of The Ring in forum Pakistan Air Force
    Replies: 42
    Last Post: 10th September 2012, 09:05
  3. Thread for Longbrained
    By Iranzamin in forum Member Introductions
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 26th August 2012, 19:16
  4. Iran Air Forces thread info+pictures!
    By Goebbles in forum Iranian Affairs
    Replies: 48
    Last Post: 8th July 2012, 18:42

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Join us on twitter Follow us on twitter