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Thread: The IDPs from North Waziristan

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  1. #41
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    JI demands Rs50,000 monthly allowance per IDP family

    Emir Jamaat-i-Islami Sirajul Haq has demanded federal government to allocate a monthly allowance of Rs50,000 for the affected families of North Waziristan (NWA) operation.

    Haq said the prime minister did not take the nation into confidence over the failure of peace talks and launch of operation.

    "If the premier had taken the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government into confidence, then better arrangements would have been made for the internally displaced persons (IDPs)," Jamaat Emir said.

    Haq also demanded the formation of a task force comprising of parliamentarians. He also asserted that the population of NWA immigrants has exceeded 750,000 and those who had migrated to Afghanistan could be an easy target for anti-state forces.

    JI chief urged the prime minister and all political parties to visit the IDPs frequently.

    Talking on Imran Khan’s threat of dissolving KP assembly, Haq said even Pakistan Tehreek-i-Insaf (PTI) members disagree with their party chief on this stance.

    Haq said that the PTI chief did not consult with JI for August 14 long march.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1116323/ji-...per-idp-family
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    Newborns at IDP camp named 'Mutasareena', 'Azb Khan'





    BANNU: A baby girl who was recently born into a family of internally displaced persons (IDPs) from North Waziristan tribal region at a IDP camp set up in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa's Bannu district has been named as Mutasareena (affectee), DawnNews reported.

    Father of Mutasareena said he had named his daughter to signify the family's exit from NWA, leaving all their property behind.

    Similarly a baby boy who was born into another IDP family was named 'Azb Khan' after the name of the operation being carried out in NWA.

    The father of the boy said he hoped that his son would grow up to be brave and courageous like soldiers of the Pakistan Army.

    More than 460,000 (IDPs) have moved out of North Waziristan region and registered at Saidgi checkpost in Frontier Region of Bannu. according to officials.

    Many others have taken refuge at their relatives place on a self-help basis.

    The exodus was prompted by the the Zarb-i-Azb operation launched in the NWA by the Pakistan Army, following a militant attack on Karachi airport.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1116536/new...reena-azb-khan
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  3. #43
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    IDPs from N Waziristan recall nightmares with Taliban

    NEW YORK: Displaced people from North Waziristan agency have spoken out against Pakistani Taliban's nightmarish hold of their tribal region bordering Afghanistan, saying they destroyed their social structure and traditions.

    Some of the tens of thousands of people from Waziristan, who have taken shelter in Bannu following Pakistani military's anti-Taliban operation, told a reporter of The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) that “unbalanced, gun-toting” young militants had let loose a reign of terror in the area, bringing violence and uncertainty to daily life.

    During the past decade, according to the dispatch, North Waziristan had become a haven for thousands of Pakistani Taliban, Al Qaeda, Afghan insurgents and militants from across the world, including Europe.

    “Everyone feared being kidnapped by the Taliban at any time, said “Zia-ur-Rehman, who ran a pharmacy in Miramshah. “Everyone knew someone who was picked up by the Taliban.”

    The non-militant inhabitants of North Waziristan were mostly traders or farmers, and almost all families had kin working as labourers in the oil-rich Gulf countries who send money home, it was pointed out.

    They enjoyed a tribal structure that provided relative stability and security. Then the US-led invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 forced elements from the Afghan Taliban and Al Qaeda to take refuge there.

    They inspired local tribesmen to form a Pakistani version of the Taliban, originally under a warlord named Nek Mohammad, who was killed in 2004 in the first US drone strike within Pakistan.

    By 2007, when Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) was established, the local militants had grown much more radical, closer to Al Qaeda than to the Afghan Taliban, and turning on Pakistani state rather than fighting the “infidel” US Army in Afghanistan.

    The TTP has since then killed hundreds of Waziristan elders, locals told WSJ, wiping out the traditional leadership, which could have led resistance.

    A 2009 military operation in South Waziristan sent more TTP and other militants, especially ethnic Uzbeks, into North Waziristan, concentrating violent extremism there, with sleeper cells across the country.

    “If anyone would have spoken against Taliban or gave information, his head would be lying at your feet the very next morning,” Gul Naeem Wazir, who came to Bannu from the Spinwan area of North Waziristan with 28 family members, was quoted as saying.

    Gul Naeem Wazir said the Pakistani Taliban “eliminated” the social structure and traditions of the region, which were based on a loose system of governance by tribal elders, known as “Maliks,” and a “jirga,” or court of elders, to settle disputes.

    Instead of rule by elders, previously marginaliased and poor young men, in their 20s and early 30s, with long hair and shaggy beards, became powerful as Taliban commanders, recruiting an army of even younger gunmen and suicide bombers.

    “You could see them in the bazaar, morning, afternoon or night,” Zia-ur-Rehman of Miramshah was quoted as saying. “Or they would drive around in cars with blacked-out windows.”

    “I was happy before. But then these long-haired men came and destroyed our lives,” Mohammad Rauf, a 55-year-old from a village near Miramshah, said. “Whoever went near them, especially children would have their minds infected.”

    Locals said that apart from militants from Central Asia with distinctive facial features 'Uzbeks, Tajiks and Uighurs from China' it was hard to tell whether the gunmen belonged to the TTP, local warlord Gul Bahadur, or the Haqqani network, which fights in Afghanistan.

    The Uzbeks, more educated than the TTP, used to spend a lot of time in the Internet cafes of Miramshah and the town of Mir Ali, Nizam Dawar, who runs a non-governmental organisation that works in North Waziristan, told WSJ.

    “People eventually realised that they made a mistake by giving these militants space,” Dawar said. “But by then it was too late.“

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1116803/idp...s-with-taliban
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  4. #44
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    Re: The IDPs from North Waziristan

    Footprints: Extremist bodies run IDP relief efforts



    WITH a scorching sun above, barbed wires flanking both sides to maintain an orderly queue, and policemen patrolling with sticks and guns, Rizwanullah has been waiting for his turn for 10 hours. He is at this sports-complex-turned-relief-camp in Bannu to receive the government’s promised ration package. It’s 3pm, and he is nowhere near to getting his turn. The camp closes down at 5pm.

    “I have eight family members to feed,” he says. “I left everything behind, and now I have to stand in this heat. I don’t even know whether my turn will come at all today.”

    Normally a resident of North Waziristan, Rizwanullah is one of the over half a million locals that have fled the army offensive. His hometown is in the tribal belt known to be home to Afghan Taliban, members of the Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan and their local and foreign affiliates.

    As the line crawls along slowly, a young volunteer sporting a neon green jacket with the initials FIF (which stands for the Falah-e-Insaniyat Foundation) is giving water to the thirsty IDPs. Dozens of hands reach out to him at the same time, men with parched lips and clothes drenched in sweat, just like Rizwanullah. The FIF volunteer quickly serves one IDP after another, and then moves back to the relief camp set up just outside the sports complex — the only one in the vicinity — for a refill. There’s a huge banner which states: “In these tough times, we are standing with you [the IDPs] — Jamaatud Dawa.”

    The Jamaatud Dawa (JuD), which changed its name to FIF after it was accused of orchestrating the 2008 Mumbai attacks, was recently identified by the United States as a front for one of the world’s largest terrorist groups. It was accused of carrying out an attack on an Indian consulate in Afghanistan in May. But in Pakistan, the group once also known as the Lashkar-e-Taiba continues to enjoy state patronage.

    Also read: WHO calls for boosting health facilities in IDP-hosting districts

    “The Pakistan Army is really cooperative towards us,” says Mohammad Sarfaraz, the chief organiser of the JuD camp. “We were the first ones to set up a greeting camp to receive the IDPs even though that area was in the red zone. This is the time to win the hearts and minds of these refugees, whom the government is failing. And the North Waziristan people are grateful to us. Many of them have promised to work for us — and that too for life,” he proudly adds.

    The organisation has over 200 volunteers distributing aid across Bannu, with 25 ambulances on standby. Sarfaraz says they have given out more than 112,000 food packets, and provided medical treatment to over 10,000 patients.

    A closer shot of the medical camp
    A closer shot of the medical camp
    And it is not just JuD that is free to operate in this region. Just half a kilometre before the sports complex, a large banner in blood-red colour bears the name of Masood Azhar, and calls him the Ameer-ul-Mujahideen. The camp, which provides water and medical facilities, also has a queue of people waiting to see the doctor.

    “There are too many patients at the hospitals so we came here,” says an IDP whose child is suffering from diarrhoea. This man is waiting to get medicine from the camp’s pharmacist.

    At first this camp’s organisers are reluctant to speak to me. “We don’t talk to the media because you publish anti-Sharia stories,” says one of them, identifying himself as Maqsood. But upon my insistence he opens up and even tells me that his organisation is involved in jihad in Kashmir and Afghanistan. “We are the soldiers of Allah and we are here to help our Muslim brothers,” he says.

    Also read: The return of Masood Azhar

    Behind him, a poster bears a picture of the Eiffel Tower with “Eurabia” written across it in English, below which there is an appeal to contribute to jihad in Syria. “We are carrying out a countrywide donation drive through mosques for the IDPs,” he tells me when asked about his source of funding for the relief efforts.

    After a few minutes, their senior camp organiser appears and asks me to leave. I head out to a nearby school that has been turned into an IDP camp with the help of a humanitarian organisation. As I share my experience with the man there, he tells me that the organisation he heads is not being allowed to set up relief camps. “The local authorities are asking us to apply for no-objection certificates while allowing religious and extremist organisations to operate freely,” says Nizam Dawar, who hails from North Waziristan and heads the Tribal Development Network which operated in the tribal belt. “These extremists are penetrating the vulnerable IDP population to brainwash and recruit them for their purposes,” he adds. “Also, these militant organisations may be giving safe passage to the fleeing terrorists who have links with them. Why is the government silent about them?”

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1116927/foo...relief-efforts
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    Re: IDPs from N Waziristan recall nightmares with Taliban

    575,000 IDPs registered in Bannu; relief efforts in progress



    BANNU: Commissioner of Bannu, Syed Mohsin Ali, held a media briefing on Friday to share the details of ongoing relief efforts for the Internally Displaced Persons (IDP) in the wake of Operation Zarb-i-Azb.

    The commissioner said that three registration points were established for the registration of people coming from different areas of North Waziristan, adding that the supply for food and other necessities had already began in the area.

    So far 575,000 people had been registered, Ali said, adding that more than 28,000 families had received financial assistance.

    He also told the briefing that aid was coming from all over the country to facilitate relief efforts.

    An army officer, Brigadier Aftab, also spoke to the media on the occasion and said that the military had already distributed food rations to 70 per cent of the families.

    "40,000 families have received ration," the military official said adding that "in the coming days, the Baka Khel camp would be transformed into a model camp."

    The official requested the IDPs residing in cities to come to the Baka Khel camp.

    Aftab informed that Ramazan packages has been distributed to 90 per cent of the families, adding that Eid packages would be distributed from today.

    Pakistan began Zarb-i-Azb, a long-awaited military offensive aimed at eliminating Taliban militants from their stronghold in the North Waziristan tribal district, in June following a brazen attack on the country's busiest airport in Karachi.

    The operation, involving air strikes, tanks and heavy artillery has forced the exodus of a large number of people, mainly to the nearby town of Bannu just outside the tribal zone.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1117022/575...ts-in-progress
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  6. #46
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    Re: The IDPs from North Waziristan

    Army provided 70% of ration distributed to IDPs: Brigadier Aftab



    Around 70% of the ration distributed amongst the internally displaced persons (IDPs) was provided by the Pakistan Army, remarked Brigadier Aftab while addressing a media briefing in Bannu on Friday.

    The commander of 475 Engineer Brigade said that 40,000 relief packages were given to IDPs from army’s own ration. He added that each package weighed 110 kilogrammes (kg).

    “The United Arab Emirates embassy has provided 50,000 packages so far with each package weighing 65kg which amounts to around 3,300 tonnes in total,” revealed the brigadier.

    Brig Aftab also stated that the World Food Programme (WFP) has provided 1,300 to 1,400 tonnes of ration up till now.

    The brigadier said that according to their record, relief packages have been distributed to 44,605 out of the 44,633 registered families of IDPs so far and that the number will cross 45,000 today.

    Brig Aftab further said that since the start of the distribution of ration on June 25, around 5,000 packages have been given out on average per day.

    Distribution points

    Speaking about the distribution points, Brigadier Aftab said the army has set up six distribution points of which three are in Bannu, two in Dera Ismail Khan and one in Lakki Marwat.

    “The WFP has also set up five distribution points – four in Bannu and one in Dera Ismail Khan,” he added.

    He further stated that in addition to these points, a mobile distribution point has also been set up.

    IDP camp Bakka Khel

    Brig Aftab, while talking about a new IDP camp being established in Bakka Khel with the help of Fata Disaster Management Authority (FDMA), said that the camp will be complete in two to three weeks.

    “Currently, tents for 500 families are available,” he remarked, adding that there is a master plan to improve the camp.

    He also revealed that rest areas, separate for men and women, were available at the camp.

    “A mosque has also been built at the camp,” said the brigadier.

    A mobile medical treatment centre and mobile dental care centre have also been established at the camp, where doctors and lady health workers are available round the clock, Brig Aftab stated.

    Speaking about future plans regarding the IDP camp, the brigadier said that there is a plan to build schools for children at the camp in addition to a vocational training centre for women and a technical skills learning centre for men.

    He also said that electricity is available at the camp 24 hours a day.

    http://tribune.com.pk/story/731120/a...igadier-aftab/
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    Re: The IDPs from North Waziristan

    Christian IDP sings tunes of Waziristan

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	731360-ChristianIDP-1404496884-314-640x480.jpg 
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    DERA ISMAIL KHAN:

    The centuries-old folk songs of Warizistan praise its culture and the bravery of its men. In his loud, melodious voice, 37-year-old Khalid Iqbal – a Christian by faith – relives the history of the land he calls home, singing songs in Pashto.

    “In the Waziristani dialect of Pashto,” he quickly corrects.

    Not only tens of thousands of Uthmanzai and Dawar tribals left their homes after the military operation Zarb-e-Azb began last month, but many minorities’ families from North Waziristan Agency have been displaced as well.

    Iqbal’s family is now settled in Pennel Public High School, Bannu, among 20 other minorities’ families. Nearly 25 more Christian and Hindu families have taken refuge in Janbaz Public School as internally displaced persons (IDPs).

    “I wish to be back at home soon. Life was good there; good weather, good friends,” says Iqbal. As a hujra singer, he performs on all occasions, including Eid, Christmas and Diwali.

    Iqbal’s family used to live in Civil Colony, Miramshah, one of nearly 200 Christian and Hindu families residing in Mirali and Miramshah, the two main towns of North Waziristan. Just like the Uthmanzai and Dawar tribes, the minorities speak Pashto in the Waziristani dialect and follow the same Waziristani culture and customs.

    A majority of Christians and Hindus have small businesses, are tailors and teachers.

    They said that before the Taliban, they lived in peace in the agency, facing no fear or harm to their individual and collective lives.

    His religion never became a hurdle in him becoming a part of Waziristani society, he claims. “Like other minorities, we were accepted and appreciated by the Uthmanzai and Dawar tribes.”

    “In 1986, there was held naat competition in which all North Waziristan government schools were invited to participate. As a grade-seven student, I participated from Government High School Miramshah and stood first,” he recalls.

    He gleefully adds, “Maulana Usman, our Islamiat teacher at the time, encouraged me to participate.”

    Even though he was trained in homeopathy, Iqbal’s heart was in music. After he sang informally at weddings and for some friends, he completed a musician’s course from Sano Bar Khan, FC Musician at Miramshah FC Fort, Iqbal told The Express Tribune.

    His seven-year-old son, Faizan, is also learning music and being trained by his father. “I hope in coming years, Faizan will earn a good name in Waziristan and he will be as respected for his music and voice like his father.”

    Many other families, too, want to return to the mountains of Waziristan after the operation, rather than migrating to a less volatile region. Many said they wanted to go back home after the operation was over, “We are from Waziristan. We are living there for three generations. I hope for peace and stability soon,” said Iqbal Masih, a 38-year-old Christian pharmacist.
    http://tribune.com.pk/story/731360/c...of-waziristan/
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  8. #48
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    IDPs’ registration: 13,000 cases rejected for duplication

    PESHAWAR: As the internally displaced persons from North Waziristan Agency line up at registration points in Bannu and Peshawar, the National Database and Registration Authority has detected 13,000 cases of such people for cash and relief goods mostly due to duplication.

    Fata Disaster Management Authority (FDMA) director general Arshad Khan told Dawn on Saturday that Nadra had so far examined the particulars of 38,000 displaced families and 25,000 of them were found to be genuine.

    “A total of 13,000 duplicated cases were detected during scrutiny and they all were rejected,” he said.

    The FDMA director general said only the families verified by Nadra would be eligible for receiving cash grant and relief assistance.

    He said 17,000 activated SIM cards of a foreign cellular company were distributed among IDPs and 5,000 such families were found to be genuine cases for cash and relief.

    Only families approved by Nadra to get cash,relief goods
    Arshad Khan said many people had obtained double SIM cards but only the Nadra-verified head of the household would receive cash grant of Rs12,000 through SIM cards.

    He said disbursement of cash grant to displaced families through SIM cards would begin on July 8.

    The FDMA director general said more than one SIM cards received by a single family would be blocked.

    He said the government had so far disbursed Rs330 million among displaced families.

    According to the FDMA, 53,819 displaced families (698,435 individuals) have been registered at Saidgi and other registration points in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa since the Pakistan Army launched the Zarb-i-Azb operation against militants in North Waziristan on June 18.

    Over 100,000 people have migrated to Afghanistan, where they are kept in camps after registration as refugees.

    The Afghan government said such people had been given shelter on humanitarian grounds.

    After registration, the data about registered IDPs is transferred to Nadra for verification. And once that is done, the government will disburse cash to the affected people living off camps across the country.

    The evacuation of civilian population from North Waziristan has come to a halt since the security forces began ground offensive in Mirali and Miramshah areas.

    The FDMA has set up additional registration points in Peshawar and Bannu for listing the people, who had left homes before the Zarb-i-Azb operation.

    The federal government had initially announced each displaced family would get Rs12,000 for purchasing monthly ration and non-food items.

    Later during a visit to the IDPs’ distribution centre in Bannu, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif had announced that the grant had been increased to Rs20,000, while Rs20,000 would be paid as Ramazan package.

    Sources said additional amount announced by the prime minister had not been transferred so far.

    Apart from cash grant, the World Food Programme is also distributing food rations, while the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is providing non-food items to IDPs.

    A handout issued here on Saturday said relief camp had also been established which would work under the Provincial Disaster Management Authority and would support the district administration in relief activities.

    It said the PDMA had requested all deputy commissioners to constitute committees at district level to gather the relevant information about displaced persons living with relatives.

    “The data will be used for security (purposes) as well as provision of relief and cash to IDPs,” it said.

    Published in Dawn, July 6th , 2014

  9. #49
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    Re: The IDPs from North Waziristan

    Taliban cut hair and beards to flee army assault



    BANNU. Hundreds of Taliban fighters rushed to disguise themselves with new haircuts in the weeks before the launch of the North Waziristan operation, it has emerged, as refugees revealed details of life under the militants - and their taste for imported luxuries.

    Azam Khan was one of the top barbers in Miramshah until he, like nearly half a million others, fled the long-awaited offensive unleashed by the military on the tribal area in June.

    He told AFP his business boomed in the month leading up to the army assault as the militants sought to shed their distinctive long-haired, bearded look.

    “I have trimmed the hair and beards of more than 700 local and Uzbek militants ahead of the security forces' operation,” he said while cutting hair in a shop in Bannu, the town where most civilians fled.

    For years he cut Taliban commanders' hair to match the flowing locks of former Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) leader Hakimullah Mehsud, killed by a US drone last November, but in May a change in style was called for.

    “The same leaders came asking for trimming their beards and hair very short, saying that they were going to the Gulf and wanted to avoid problems at Pakistani airports,” Khan said.

    Even Uzbeks and Tajiks with little knowledge of the local language came to him, he said.

    “Knowing little Pashto, they used to utter four words: 'mulgari (friend), machine, zero, Islamabad',” said Khan -- asking him to shave their beards to nothing so they could go to Islamabad.

    French perfume
    The military launched the offensive against militants in North Waziristan tribal area on June 15, vowing to wipe out the strongholds they have used to wreak countless deadly terror attacks across the country.

    The rugged, mountainous area on the Afghan border has been a hideout for years for Islamist militants of all stripes - including Al Qaeda and the homegrown TTP as well as foreign fighters including Uzbeks and Uighurs.

    For years people from North Waziristan remained tight-lipped about life in a Taliban fiefdom, scared of being kidnapped or even beheaded if they shared information about the militants.

    But as the exodus of people has grown, some have found the confidence to tell their stories.

    While the militants bombed and maimed thousands in their fight to install an austere sharia regime in Pakistan and publicly professed contempt for the West, in North Waziristan they indulged themselves with fancy imported goods.

    Hikmatullah Khan, a shopkeeper in Miramshah, said that at the same time as commanders were insisting he pay 300 rupees a month “tax”, their fighters were stocking up on grooming products.

    “They were very keen to buy foreign-branded shampoos, soaps and perfumed sprays,” Khan told AFP.

    “They had a lot of eagerness for French and Turkish perfumes, body sprays and soaps. “Muhammad Zarif, a wholesale merchant in Datta Khel, near Miramshah, said fighters would buy large quantities of British detergent and American cooking oil, much of it smuggled from Dubai.

    Militants gone?
    Pakistan's allies, particularly the United States, have long called for an operation to flush out groups like the Haqqani network, which use the area to target Nato troops in neighbouring Afghanistan and are thought to have links to Pakistani intelligence services.

    The military has said it will target militants “of all hue and colour” but the scant resistance troops have encountered has led many to believe the insurgents fled before the offensive, limiting its effectiveness.

    The army says the operation has killed nearly 400 militants and will rid North Waziristan of their bases, denying them the space to plan attacks and allowing investment to come to one of the country's poorest areas.

    But it remains to be seen what the long-term impact of the offensive will be. Local intelligence and militant sources told AFP that up to 80 per cent of fighters fled after rumours of an army assault emerged in early May, most over the porous border into Afghanistan.

    These sources estimate the present number of militants as around 2,000, down from around 10,000 before the operation. The figures are uncertain and difficult to confirm.

    The army has asked Afghanistan to crack down on TTP refuges across the border and this week top brass from both sides met in Islamabad to discuss the issue.

    “It is clear that militants were aware that the offensive was coming before it started. Lots of them fled,” a Western diplomat told AFP.

    “The big question is: after the offensive, will Pakistan allow the Haqqanis and others to come back? “
    http://www.dawn.com/news/1117448/tal...e-army-assault

  10. #50
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    Re: The IDPs from North Waziristan

    Militants won’t be allowed to mingle with IDPs: Mashhood



    LAHORE: Punjab Law and Education Minister Rana Mashhood says the law-enforcement agencies will ensure that no militants in the guise of internally displaced persons (IDPs) should join the network of extremists through the urban areas of Punjab.

    The minister was talking to the media after addressing the owners of private schools and principals of public and private colleges of the province at a fund-raiser for the IDPs at the Directorate of Staff Development on Saturday.

    Mr Khan said police and secret agencies should coordinate with one another and added that hooliganism was not a solution to any problem.

    Know more: Militants in the garb of IDPs

    Responding to a question about electoral reforms, he admitted electoral reforms were need of the hour but the parliament was only a legal and constitutional forum for the purpose. He said the federal government had made nominations in a special parliamentary committee for making amendments to the election laws.

    “If PTI chief Imran Khan is serious about electoral reforms, why is he not nominating his assembly members for this purpose?” he asked.

    In the same go, he stressed, Imran Khan should display political maturity as 7.6 million voters had expressed their confidence in him in general elections to play his due role in the assemblies.

    He said those making claims of bringing about a revolution in a few weeks, in fact, wanted to hoodwink the people and they were trying to sabotage the development in the country.

    The minister said the military operation was started against the Taliban as they wanted that their demands be accepted through force and lawlessness instead of constitution and law.

    Earlier, speaking at the fund-raising event, Mr Mashhood said the army was ensuring security of the country by eliminating terrorists through Operation Zarb-e-Azb. He said the nation was imbued with a spirit of sacrifice for their displaced brethren who had been besieged by the terrorists who wanted to use them as human shield in North Waziristan.

    Also read: 118 suspects arrested

    He said the IDPs were patriotic Pakistanis and the army as well as federal government would provide them with every facility. He said the Operation Zarb-i-Azb would continue till the elimination of last terrorist in the country. He hoped that when the IDPs would return to their homes, they would live in a peaceful and prosperous atmosphere.
    http://www.dawn.com/news/1117361/mil...-idps-mashhood

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    51 million dollars required for IDPs in Pakistan: WFP

    World Food Programme (WFP) says it needs 51 million dollars for its relief activities in Pakistan until the end of the year.

    In an interview, WFP Pakistan Country Director Ms Castro said this included assistance to the newly displaced population from North Waziristan, families displaced earlier and people returning to their areas.

    She said the WFP has provided 15-day food rations to displaced families in Bannu and Lakki Marwat districts. WFP is distributing its standard food basket of wheat flour, pulses, vegetable oil and iodized salt.

    http://www.nation.com.pk/national/05...n-pakistan-wfp

  12. #52
    Member dilkumar's Avatar
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    Re: 51 million dollars required for IDPs in Pakistan: WFP

    I can see the overseas Pakistanis and Pakistanis in the country step up to help these IDPs in every capacity, but the international community seems to be lacking (besides a few reputable NGOs).

  13. #53
    Senior Member Fassi's Avatar
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    N Waziristan operation reverses flow of refugees

    BANNU. Hundreds of Taliban fighters rushed to disguise themselves with new haircuts in the weeks before the launch of the North Waziristan operation, it has emerged, as refugees revealed details of life under the militants - and their taste for imported luxuries.

    Azam Khan was one of the top barbers in Miramshah until he, like nearly half a million others, fled the long-awaited offensive unleashed by the military on the tribal area in June.

    He told AFP his business boomed in the month leading up to the army assault as the militants sought to shed their distinctive long-haired, bearded look.

    “I have trimmed the hair and beards of more than 700 local and Uzbek militants ahead of the security forces' operation,” he said while cutting hair in a shop in Bannu, the town where most civilians fled.

    For years he cut Taliban commanders' hair to match the flowing locks of former Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) leader Hakimullah Mehsud, killed by a US drone last November, but in May a change in style was called for.

    “The same leaders came asking for trimming their beards and hair very short, saying that they were going to the Gulf and wanted to avoid problems at Pakistani airports,” Khan said.

    Even Uzbeks and Tajiks with little knowledge of the local language came to him, he said.

    “Knowing little Pashto, they used to utter four words: 'mulgari (friend), machine, zero, Islamabad',” said Khan -- asking him to shave their beards to nothing so they could go to Islamabad.

    French perfume
    The military launched the offensive against militants in North Waziristan tribal area on June 15, vowing to wipe out the strongholds they have used to wreak countless deadly terror attacks across the country.

    The rugged, mountainous area on the Afghan border has been a hideout for years for Islamist militants of all stripes - including Al Qaeda and the homegrown TTP as well as foreign fighters including Uzbeks and Uighurs.

    For years people from North Waziristan remained tight-lipped about life in a Taliban fiefdom, scared of being kidnapped or even beheaded if they shared information about the militants.

    But as the exodus of people has grown, some have found the confidence to tell their stories.

    While the militants bombed and maimed thousands in their fight to install an austere sharia regime in Pakistan and publicly professed contempt for the West, in North Waziristan they indulged themselves with fancy imported goods.

    Hikmatullah Khan, a shopkeeper in Miramshah, said that at the same time as commanders were insisting he pay 300 rupees a month “tax”, their fighters were stocking up on grooming products.

    “They were very keen to buy foreign-branded shampoos, soaps and perfumed sprays,” Khan told AFP.

    “They had a lot of eagerness for French and Turkish perfumes, body sprays and soaps. “Muhammad Zarif, a wholesale merchant in Datta Khel, near Miramshah, said fighters would buy large quantities of British detergent and American cooking oil, much of it smuggled from Dubai.

    Militants gone?
    Pakistan's allies, particularly the United States, have long called for an operation to flush out groups like the Haqqani network, which use the area to target Nato troops in neighbouring Afghanistan and are thought to have links to Pakistani intelligence services.

    The military has said it will target militants “of all hue and colour” but the scant resistance troops have encountered has led many to believe the insurgents fled before the offensive, limiting its effectiveness.

    The army says the operation has killed nearly 400 militants and will rid North Waziristan of their bases, denying them the space to plan attacks and allowing investment to come to one of the country's poorest areas.

    But it remains to be seen what the long-term impact of the offensive will be. Local intelligence and militant sources told AFP that up to 80 per cent of fighters fled after rumours of an army assault emerged in early May, most over the porous border into Afghanistan.

    These sources estimate the present number of militants as around 2,000, down from around 10,000 before the operation. The figures are uncertain and difficult to confirm.

    The army has asked Afghanistan to crack down on TTP refuges across the border and this week top brass from both sides met in Islamabad to discuss the issue.

    “It is clear that militants were aware that the offensive was coming before it started. Lots of them fled,” a Western diplomat told AFP.

    “The big question is: after the offensive, will Pakistan allow the Haqqanis and others to come back? “

    Source: DAWN

  14. #54
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    N Waziristan operation reverses flow of refugees

    KHOST: Thousands of refugees fleeing the offensive by the army have poured across the lawless border into ramshackle camps on rugged hills in Afghanistan, stirring unease that Taliban militants may be hiding among them.

    The mass departures over the porous border, which many in any case do not recognise, mark a change. For the first time in more than 30 years beleaguered residents are escaping into Afghanistan and not out of it, an irony not lost on local officials or refugee agencies.

    Authorities in Khost province are offering a warm welcome and what little they have to shelter the newcomers. But intelligence officers and the army are uneasy — some refugees from North Waziristan province could be militants of the Tehreek-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), the target of operation Zarb-iAzb.

    “These communities for decades have been the ones benefiting from the support of tribal communities in North Waziristan when they had to flee,” said Bo Shack, the top official in Afghanistan of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees.

    “Today they want to provide these families with equal help.” Refugees poured over the border in the other direction after Soviet troops invaded Afghanistan in 1979. More followed after Moscow's pullout a decade later sparked mass disorder and still more fled after Afghanistan's own Taliban took power in 1996.

    Some 3.8 million Afghans have returned to Afghanistan since the Taliban were ousted by a US-led coalition of forces in 2001, while 1.6 million remain there as refugees.

    Circumstances are now different.

    The TTP is stronger and more audacious but with few aims in common with their Afghan brethren, last month they attacked Karachi airport. The military, weary of negotiations, told residents in the Taliban's Waziristan stronghold to get out in advance of a crackdown.

    A two-week bombing campaign gave way to a ground offensive. Pakistani officials say all civilians have left and anyone still there will be classed as a militant.

    The governor of Khost province applauded the hospitality of Afghan border villages last week at a gathering of Afghan officials and UN representatives at the refugee camps.

    “People displaced from the other side of the border are our friends,” said governor Abdul Jabbar Naeemi. “People are trying to help families, even though they themselves don't have much.”

    Mohammad Akram Khalwak, the minister for tribal and border affairs, promised help: “We will not give them weapons. We will help give them education.”

    The NDS intelligence agency, on guard against attempts by the Afghan Taliban to stage armed attacks to dislodge the Kabul government, is less sanguine.

    “The NDS and the governor believe the Taliban have infiltrated the camps with weapons and could use them at any time,” said a security official at the camps, declining to give his name.

    “Most of the families belong to the Taliban and will cross back if an operation starts here.” Each country accuses the other of harbouring militants.

    Tents on the Hills
    Hundreds of white UN tents extend across rolling terrain dotted with sparse vegetation, with refugees putting up colourful drapes to create makeshift courtyards and a modicum of privacy. The UN said around 77,000 are in Khost. Ration packages stacked in tents are, like everything else, covered in dust. Children run everywhere, with toddlers scratching about in the dirt like hens.

    Mothers look on from shade, some in patterned headscarves, while others drift across the camp in black head-to-toe burqas.

    Mahir Khan, who fled North Waziristan with her husband and 10 children, said the family made a living from farming. Trapped between the impending offensive and pledges by TTP to fight back, she saw little choice but to leave.

    “We came here because of the fighting,” she said, children in different coloured dresses gathered at her feet.

    “The government warned us of a military operation. The Taliban also warned us, 'We are going to fight and if you get hurt it will not be our responsibility.'”

    Achtar Marjana, an elderly women with leather-like skin, said her family had two days to get out. “We were forced by the government to leave with two days' warning,” she said.

    “Apart from this tent, we have not received anything.” Khost has long been a concern for Afghan forces and the Nato troops bolstering them. In 2009, seven US Central Intelligence Agency officers were blown up at their own base by an Al Qaeda mole, the deadliest attack on the agency in 25 years.

    And it was here last month that US serviceman Bowe Bergdahl, held by the Taliban for five years, was handed to the United States in exchange for five prominent Taliban detainees.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1117446/n-w...ow-of-refugees

  15. #55
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    Re: N Waziristan operation reverses flow of refugees

    I would encourage all concerned to pay special attention -- political influence from inside and outside Pakistan (Arabian Peninsula) is resulting in a narrative that will become more and more forceful, that there may have been at most 1000 to a 2000 militants -- think that one over, 2000 militants will have held the nuclear armed state of Pakistan, with a population exceeding 200 million, and a Army of more than 700,000, along with a similar number of police and reserve.

    Think this narrative over, if this narrative gains ground, it will have profound repercussions - first and foremost for the PA, and secondly for the people of Pakistan -- you will note that I have not included politicians, please trust there are as safe church mice/

    So, what is the implication of the narrative of no more than 2000 militants, for the PA ? -- First the idea of cleansing the nation of terrorism, will be history, then of course since a vast majority of terrorists will not have been killed, expect more urban terror - this will further challenge the image of the PA as trustworthy, because the promise of cleansing.the nation of terrorism is will one more idea that the PA could not deliver one.

    As the vast majority of terrorists will go urban, spectacular attacks will be forth coming -- and immediately after these attacks, expect FATA to once again, play host to Islamist terror international.

    Wait a minute, what happens to IDP? Again, not a political problem, they are a problem for the PA, it was PA who developed a policy of draining the swamp, and the IDP will slowly return to FATA, with large numbers moving to larger urban centers, particularly KHI but also ISB (Urban terror).

    So, wait, let me head around this, why do politicians want this to be a short operation?? IM the Dim - in other words, they have political fish to fry and cannot afford dealing with IDP, they want to be able to focus political attention elsewhere, which of course means, something anti-US has to be built upon, after all everyone can agree on whatever anti-US can be built upon, that will take the sting out of Im the Dim, because he too will have change the focus and get on the anti US bandwagon.

  16. #56
    Senior Member Hariz's Avatar
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    Win IDPs and you’ll win Zarb-e-Azb: Sheikh Rasheed

    Awami Muslim League (AML) chief Sheikh Rasheed on Sunday said that winning hearts of internally displaced persons (IDPs) was a key to success in the ongoing military operation in North Waziristan.

    Addressing a massive gathering held by the MQM at Jinnah Ground Sunday, Rasheed called for an immediate release of Rs 17 billion for the IDPs. He lamented that government was spending a whopping amount of Rs 117 billion on metro buses, laptops schemes and Benazir Bhutto Income Support Program (BISP), however only Rs 1 billion was spent on the IDPs.

    Vowing to foil every conspiracy against Pakistan Army, he said, “Pakistan Army is the largest army in the Islamic world. In Libya and Iraq, army was weakened first.”

    Pakistan Army was fighting an “undeclared war”, he said, adding that there was no threat to Pakistan from borders. Rashid was of the view that this war was being fought with a strategy. “It is important to show unity at this critical juncture,” he added.

    http://www.pakistantoday.com.pk/2014...heikh-rasheed/

  17. #57
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    Re: 51 million dollars required for IDPs in Pakistan: WFP

    Quote Originally Posted by cb4 View Post
    World Food Programme (WFP) says it needs 51 million dollars for its relief activities in Pakistan until the end of the year.

    In an interview, WFP Pakistan Country Director Ms Castro said this included assistance to the newly displaced population from North Waziristan, families displaced earlier and people returning to their areas.

    She said the WFP has provided 15-day food rations to displaced families in Bannu and Lakki Marwat districts. WFP is distributing its standard food basket of wheat flour, pulses, vegetable oil and iodized salt.

    http://www.nation.com.pk/national/05...n-pakistan-wfp
    Zarb-e-Azb updates: 'US, UAE provide $51m for N Waziristan IDPs'

    The United States has extended an assistance of $31 million, while the government of United Arab Emirates (UAE) has released $20.5 million for the internally displaced persons (IDPs) of North Wazirstan on humanitarian grounds.

    According to a detailed report submitted to Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, so far 572,529 IDPs, belonging to 44,633 families, have been registered since the beginning of the Zarb-e-Azb operation in mid June, 2014.
    http://tribune.com.pk/story/722202/a...th-waziristan/

  18. #58
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Re: 51 million dollars required for IDPs in Pakistan: WFP

    Quote Originally Posted by bilalhaider View Post
    Zarb-e-Azb updates: 'US, UAE provide $51m for N Waziristan IDPs'

    http://tribune.com.pk/story/722202/a...th-waziristan/
    Very commendable, as long as it all gets to the destination needed.

  19. #59
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    Re: The IDPs from North Waziristan

    Over half a million IDPs registered



    ISLAMABAD: Over half a million people displaced by the military operation in North Waziristan have been registered so far.

    A freshly consolidated report, submitted to Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif on Sunday, puts the number of registered internally displaced persons (IDPs) at 572,529.

    At least 44,633 families have fled their homes in the restive tribal agency after the military launched Operation Zarb-i-Azb, targeting terrorist sanctuaries in the area, according to a statement issued by the Prime Minister’s Office.

    The spiralling number of displaced people is alarming, as many fear the government and other aid agencies may not be able to cope with such a large number of refugees.

    Govt had originally planned for 600,000 refugees
    On June 24, Minister for States and Frontier Regions Abdul Qadir Baloch had said the government estimated the total number of IDPs from North Waziristan to be around 600,000, adding that they had made arrangements to provide food and shelter to over half a million people.

    Now though, as the number inches dangerously close to that ceiling, government and aid officials say that the number is inflated by duplication and that once the National Database and Registration Authority (Nadra) sifts through the data, this number might rise or fall.

    Related: IDPs’ registration: 13,000 cases rejected for duplication

    Information Minister Pervaiz Rashid told Dawn the prime minister had promised that no expense would be spared in taking care of IDPs. “Each family coming from North Waziristan is being registered through Nadra and will receive financial assistance after due verification,” he said.

    Mr Rashid said that according to government estimates, each family would receive Rs40,000 in cash and rations worth Rs30,000 in the first month. As per the prime minister’s orders, each registered family is expected to receive compensation through Zong mobile phone SIMs, starting July 8.

    The report released to the press by the PM Office reveals that Rs329.57 million has been distributed among 27,664 families in financial support, while 4,500 tons of relief goods have been provided to 31,000 registered families in collaboration with the Pakistan Army and the World Food Programme (WFP).

    About 5,000 food packages, weighing 110 kilogrammes each, are being distributed every day at 11 distribution points and non-food items, such as household goods, have also been distributed among 31,000 families.

    Opinion: The persecuted

    WFP spokesperson Amjad Jamal told Dawn it was difficult to be certain at the moment, as more and more refugees continued to flood into government camps every day. “There are many cases where different male members from the same family unit have registered themselves separately. This is in addition to the scores of unregistered families and others who do not possess identity cards, which are a prerequisite for obtaining aid. Data-cleaning is under way and we will soon have a clear idea of the total number of internally displaced families,” Mr Jamal said.

    The finance ministry has so far released Rs1.5 billion for the IDPs. The federal cabinet’s Economic Coordination Committee recently approved 60,000 tons of wheat worth Rs.2.8bn for distribution among the displaced. The army has also established 33 points countrywide to collect donations from the general public.

    Rescue 1122 is contributing staff and equipment for relief efforts and 15 mobile veterinary clinics have been established in Bannu, Lakki Marwat, Dera Ismail Khan, Karak and Tank. These have treated more than 20,000 animals so far while another 42,000 animals have been vaccinated.

    Among foreign donors, the US and UAE governments have released $31m and $20.5m, respectively.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1117525/ove...dps-registered

  20. #60
    Banned alihamza's Avatar
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    Re: 51 million dollars required for IDPs in Pakistan: WFP

    Up to 93 families relocate to North Waziristan village



    As a top military commander visited the troops in North Waziristan Agency (NWA) on Sunday, as many as 93 displaced families have returned to the Eidak village of agency’s Mirali tehsil.

    The families, which amount to more than a thousand individuals, returned after security forces declared the area cleared of militants, an official of the tribal agency’s political administration told The Express Tribune.

    “Elders of the village have been holding talks with security forces over the past two days after the area was declared clear [of militants],” the official said. “The elders have assured security officials that they will not allow any militants into the area,” he added.
    According to the official, the elders, while assuring their all-out support to the armed forces, pointed out that they had razed militant seminaries and hideouts in the area in the past.

    “Following the talks, 93 families moved back from Bannu and other parts of Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa to their native areas in the agency,” he said.

    Peshawar corps commander visits troops

    Peshawar Corps Commander Lt Gen Khalid Rabbani visited the troops in North Waziristan Agency on Sunday and vowed that the operation will continue till the last terrorist was eliminated from the troubled region. The senior commander is the first high-ranking army official to visit the restive tribal area since Operation Zarb-e-Azb was launched.

    According to an Inter-Services Public Relations statement, Lt-Gen Rabbani visited Miramshah and met the troops fighting what the army has dubbed a ‘battle of survival’ for Pakistan. The statement said the corps commander was given a detailed briefing about the progress of the operation.

    Sources said the general was informed that the operation was progressing as planned and security forces continued to strangulate militant hideouts. They added that Lt-Gen Rabbani told the troops that the entire nation was looking up to the armed forces to defeat terrorists.

    The general said the army would make sure that the writ of the state was established in NWA in the shortest possible time so that internally displaced persons (IDPs) could safely return to their homes.

    Meanwhile, Defence Minister Khawaja Muhammad Asif said the military operation in North Waziristan would continue till terrorism was rooted out from the area.

    On Sunday, the minister told reporters the government would take all mainstream parties into confidence on the issue of eradicating terrorism and rehabilitating IDPs.

    He added that it was not possible at this stage to give any timeline for the completion of the operation.

    http://tribune.com.pk/story/732169/u...istan-village/

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