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    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
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    ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    At least 25 people have been killed and 40 wounded in a truck bombing at a market in the Iraqi city of Diwaniya.

    Dozens more have been killed and wounded in bomb attacks in other cities across the country, reports say.

    In the central city of Karbala, four people were killed when two car bombs targeting Shia pilgrims exploded.

    There has been a spike in attacks across Iraq in recent weeks. June was the bloodiest month in the country since US troops withdrew in December.

    It is thought the Karbala blasts, which also injured at least 30 people, were aimed at pilgrims gathering ahead of a religious ceremony on Friday.

    The Shia community is celebrating the Shabaniyah festival, which marks the anniversary of the birth of key Shia Imam.

    The Diwaniya blast was near a mosque where pilgrims were gathering to make the journey to Karbala, according to Reuters.

    Diwaniya is 130 km (80 miles) from Karbala.

    Police have imposed a partial curfew and closed all entrances to the city, the agency says.

    There were also blasts in the Sunni city of Taji, the site of a military base 20km (12 miles) north of Baghdad.

    Three people were killed there - including a policeman, and 15 were injured, according to news agency AP.

    No group has claimed responsibility for the blasts.

    The chairman of the Qadisiyah provincial council, Jubair al-Jabouri, blamed the Diwaniya attacks on Sunni insurgents linked to al-Qaeda.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-18685506

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    Senior Member Express's Avatar
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    ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    HILLA: Bombs mainly targeting Shia Muslims and security forces in Iraq killed 45 people and wounded 205 others on Thursday in the deadliest day of violence to hit the country in more than two months.

    The attacks, the worst since 76 people were killed on September 9, included the second series of bombings against Shias this week, after three car bombs exploded near their places of worship in Baghdad on Tuesday, killing a dozen and wounding scores more.

    The Thursday violence brings the number of people killed in attacks this month to at least 152, 16 more than in October, according to an AFP tally based on security and medical sources. That reversed a three-month trend of declining death tolls.

    Two roadside bombs targeted a group of Shia pilgrims in the city of Hilla, police said. A list of victims posted at a hospital in Hilla put the toll at 33 killed and 166 wounded, figures confirmed by Babil provincial council member Hamed Ahmed Abboud.

    Iraqi security forces cordoned off the area of the blasts and set up checkpoints in the city to search cars, an AFP correspondent said, adding that shops near the site were shuttered after the attacks.

    Ali al-Khafaji, the owner of a mobile phone shop in the area of the blasts, said there was a big explosion near a restaurant where a tent serving food to Shiite pilgrims was set up, followed by another blast when emergency personnel arrived at the scene.

    In the shrine city of Karbala, a car bomb exploded under a bridge, killing five people and wounding 13, a police spokesman and a medical official said.

    The spokesman said security forces closed off all roads leading to the old city, where Imam Hussein, one of the most revered figures in Shia Islam, is buried, and were searching for a second car bomb.

    Security forces were also targeted on Thursday.

    A suicide car bomb against an army patrol in Fallujah, west of Baghdad, killed three soldiers and wounded three others and four civilians.

    A car bomb in Mosul in Iraq’s north targeted a police patrol, killing a policeman and a civilian and wounding two more police, security and medical sources said.

    A car bomb on the main road south of Baghdad killed one person and wounded 11, including three police, while two roadside bombs near a military base north of the city killed one person and wounded six others, an interior ministry official and medical sources said.

    Members of Iraq’s security forces and the country’s Shia majority are both frequently targeted by Sunni insurgents in bomb attacks.

    Millions of pilgrims flock to Karbala each year for Ashura commemorations marking Hussein’s death in battle in 680 AD, which peaked on November 25 this year.

    While pilgrims have often been targeted by bombings during Ashura that killed dozens, the commemorations were largely free of violence this year, though two attacks against pilgrims killed three people and wounded 35.

    Pilgrims also walk from across Iraq to Karbala during the 40-day mourning period that follows Ashura.

    “What happened is that security forces were in the peak of readiness and activity during the last occasion (Ashura),” but became less so after the commemorations concluded, Ali al-Haidari, an Iraqi expert in security and strategic issues, told AFP.

    “Security forces usually become tired after such occasions, and the enemy benefits from this directly. In addition to that, there is also the absence of modern technologies which can detect explosives,” Haidari said.

    Violence in Iraq has decreased dramatically from its peak in 2006 and 2007, when brutal sectarian violence swept the country, but attacks remain common.

    Iraq bombings leave 45 people dead | DAWN.COM

  3. #3
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
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    Rest in Peace to the dead. Hope Al-Qaeda is eliminated quickly.

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    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Rip to the dead. Hope those responsible get caught.

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    Senior Member Sinbad's Avatar
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    ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Attacks targeting Shia Muslims on the festival of Ashura have killed at least 41 people across Iraq.

    In Diyala province at least 32 people were killed, while in Wasit province at least nine died when two bomb blasts hit a religious procession.

    Up to two million Shia will make an Ashura pilgrimage to the Iraqi city of Karbala, where the Prophet Muhammad's grandson Hussein was killed in 680AD.

    Shia religious events are frequently targeted by Sunni militants.

    A double blast in the northern, ethnically mixed city of Kirkuk also wounded five people, officials said.

    Map
    On Wednesday, a string of bomb attacks in Iraq targeting Shia pilgrims and police left at least 20 people dead, officials said.

    Sectarian violence in Iraq has reached its highest level since 2008.

    The UN says 979 people - including 158 police and 127 military personnel - were killed in violent attacks in October. More than 6,500 civilians have died this year.

    Iraq has also seen a spill-over of violence from the conflict in Syria, where jihadist rebels linked to the Islamic State of Iraq, a Sunni militant umbrella group that includes al-Qaeda, have risen to prominence.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-24936961

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    Re: Iraqi bombs hit Shia religious processions near Baghdad

    Iraqi bombs?? More like Saudi bombs

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    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
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    Re: Iraqi bombs hit Shia religious processions near Baghdad

    Almost inevitable. RIP

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    Senior Member ManojKumar's Avatar
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    Christmas bombings kill 34 in Iraq

    BAGHDAD: At least 34 people were killed in three bombings in Christian areas of Baghdad on Wednesday, including a car bomb that exploded as worshippers were leaving a Christmas service, Iraqi police and medics said.

    Elsewhere in Iraq, at least 10 people were killed in three attacks that targeted police and Shi'ite pilgrims, police said.

    Iraq is enduring its deadliest violence in years, reviving memories of the sectarian bloodshed between Sunni and Shi'ite Muslims that killed tens of thousands in 2006-07.

    The day's deadliest incident occurred in the Doura district of southern Baghdad when the car bomb went off as Christians were emerging from a Christmas mass, killing at least 24 people.

    Shortly before, two bombs in a crowded market in a separate, mostly Christian area of Doura killed another 10 people.

    Ahmed Edan, a policeman on duty in the area of the attacks, said the sound of the first of the two explosions caused worshippers to leave the church.

    "A car parked near the church exploded when the families were hugging each other goodbye before leaving. The blast was powerful," he said.

    "Bodies of women, girls and men were lying on the ground covered in blood. Others were screaming and crying while they were trying to save some of their wounded relatives."

    No one immediately claimed responsibility for the attacks in Baghdad, which also wounded 52 people.

    Iraq's fast-dwindling Christian minority has been a target of al-Qaida Sunni militants in the past, including a 2010 attack on a church that killed dozens of people.

    US CONDEMNS "SENSELESS" ATTACKS

    The US embassy in Baghdad condemned the bombings, saying in a statement that Christians in Iraq had suffered "deliberate and senseless targeting by terrorists for many years, as have many other innocent Iraqis".

    Al Qaida-linked militants have stepped up attacks on Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki's Shi'ite-led government and anyone seen as supporting it in recent months. More than 8,000 people have been killed this year, according to the United Nations.

    Car bombs, shootings and suicide attacks killed scores of Shi'ite pilgrims in the week before the Shi'ite holy day of Arbain, which coincided with Christmas Eve this year.

    On Wednesday, a bomb struck a minibus in southern Baghdad carrying pilgrims back from the Shi'ite holy city of Kerbala, killing three and wounding eight, police and medics said.

    To the west of Tikrit, 150 km (95 miles) north of Baghdad, gunmen killed three policemen on patrol, police sources said.

    A bomb exploded near a football pitch in the town of Ishaqi, 100 km north of the capital, killing four people, including two policemen, and wounding eight, police said.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/w...w/27926776.cms

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    Senior Member Mazea's Avatar
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    Iraqi forces arrest seven Saudi terrorists in Ramadi



    The Iraqi security forces have arrested seven Saudi terrorists in Ramadi region, west of the Iraqi capital of Baghdad, media reports said.
    The arrested Saudi terrorists were in charge of organizing armed militants in Ramadi region to carry out terrorist operations there, the Arabic-language Al-Mayadeen news website reported.

    Clashes broke out Monday in the Ramadi area, West of Baghdad, as security forces dismantled a protest camp where demonstrators had gathered for more than a year.

    Ten militants died in the fighting, which also spread to the nearby city of Fallujah.

    Protests broke out in the area in December 2012 after the arrest of guards of then-finance minister Rafa al-Essawi, on terrorism charges.

    The Iraqi premier had described the protest site as “a headquarters for the leadership of Al-Qaeda,” and urged the protesters to leave the camps.

    Defense Ministry Spokesman Lieutenant General Mohammed al-Askari told state television the decision to remove the camp came after tribal leaders and local government and defense ministry officials reached a deal.

    http://en.alalam.ir/news/1550505
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    Re: Iraqi forces arrest seven Saudi terrorists in Ramadi

    Quote Originally Posted by Mazea View Post


    The Iraqi security forces have arrested seven Saudi terrorists in Ramadi region, west of the Iraqi capital of Baghdad, media reports said.
    The arrested Saudi terrorists were in charge of organizing armed militants in Ramadi region to carry out terrorist operations there, the Arabic-language Al-Mayadeen news website reported.

    Clashes broke out Monday in the Ramadi area, West of Baghdad, as security forces dismantled a protest camp where demonstrators had gathered for more than a year.

    Ten militants died in the fighting, which also spread to the nearby city of Fallujah.

    Protests broke out in the area in December 2012 after the arrest of guards of then-finance minister Rafa al-Essawi, on terrorism charges.

    The Iraqi premier had described the protest site as “a headquarters for the leadership of Al-Qaeda,” and urged the protesters to leave the camps.

    Defense Ministry Spokesman Lieutenant General Mohammed al-Askari told state television the decision to remove the camp came after tribal leaders and local government and defense ministry officials reached a deal.

    http://en.alalam.ir/news/1550505
    Good work iraqui forces now dont show mercy and massacrre all these terrorists

  11. #11
    Senior Member Sinbad's Avatar
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    Over 100 die as Iraq forces battle Al Qaeda

    RAMADI (Iraq): More than 100 people were killed on Friday as Iraqi police and tribesmen battled Al Qaeda-linked militants who took over parts of two Anbar provincial cities, announcing one an Islamic state.

    Parts of Ramadi and Fallujah, west of Baghdad, have been held by militants for days, harkening back to the years after the 2003 US-led invasion when both cities were insurgent strongholds.

    Fighting began in the Ramadi area on Monday, when security forces removed the main anti-government protest camp set up after demonstrations broke out in late 2012 against what Sunni Arabs say is the targeting of their community.

    Anger at the government among the Sunni minority is seen as one of the main drivers of the worst violence to hit Iraq in five years.

    Police and tribesmen fought in Ramadi and Fallujah on Friday against militants from Al Qaeda-linked group the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), which operates in Iraq and Syria, security officials said.

    At least 32 civilians and 71 ISIL fighters died in the clashes, the officials said, adding that they did not know how many police and tribesmen were killed.

    Fallujah was the target of two assaults after the 2003 US-led invasion, in which American forces saw some of their heaviest fighting since the Vietnam War.—AFP

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    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
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    Dozens killed in Iraq bomb attacks

    At least 73 people have been killed in a series of bombings in central Iraq, police and medical officials say.

    Sixteen died in an attack on a funeral for a pro-government Sunni militiaman in a village south of Baquba, the capital of Diyala province.

    Nine car bombs meanwhile exploded across Baghdad, killing at least 37 people and wounding dozens more.

    There has been a surge in sectarian violence across Iraq in the past year, reaching levels not seen since 2007.

    The United Nations says 7,818 civilians and 1,050 members of the security forces died in 2013. December alone saw at least 759 killed.

    'Long battle'
    In Wednesday's deadliest incident, a suicide bomber blew himself up inside a funeral tent in the village of Buhriz where mourners were marking the death two days ago of a member of a local Sahwa, or Awakening Council, set up Sunni Arab tribesmen to fight al-Qaeda.



    The car bomb attacks that shook Baghdad started at about 10:30 (07:30) and continued for about an hour, striking busy markets in mostly in predominantly Shia districts of the capital but also in mixed areas.

    Five shoppers were killed and 12 others wounded when a car blew up at an outdoor market in the northern Shula district, police officials said. In nearby Shaab, a car bombing killed four civilians and wounded 14.

    Two car bomb blasts in separate locations in the central area of Karrada meanwhile killed six civilians and wounded 24. Another four were killed in the southern suburb of Husseiniya, and three in Maamil, to the east.

    Thirteen people, including nine soldiers, were killed in and around the northern city of Mosul, according to the AFP news agency. Six of the soldiers died when a roadside bomb was detonated as they crossed a bridge at Ain al-Jahash.

    Wednesday's violence comes amid a continuing stand-off between security forces and Sunni militants aligned to al-Qaeda who seized control of the city of Falluja, west of Baghdad, more than two weeks ago.

    The militants launched co-ordinated attacks to the north of the city on Tuesday, destroying two army tanks and capturing a police station.

    Prime Minister Nouri Maliki, a Shia, has vowed to eradicate the al-Qaeda affiliated Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIS), but has ruled out an assault on Falluja, saying residents must force the group to leave.

    The militants were also reported to have made gains on Tuesday in Ramadi, the nearby capital of Anbar province, which they briefly controlled at the start of the month before being ousted by security forces and pro-government Sahwa militiamen.

    After meeting Mr Maliki in Baghdad on Monday, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon urged Iraq's leaders to address the "root causes" of the unrest and "ensure that there is nobody left behind".

    Mr Ban called for political and social cohesion, and "inclusive dialogue".

    But the prime minister insisted that what was happening in Anbar had "no relation to Iraqi problems" and rejected the UN appeal for dialogue.

    On Wednesday, Mr Maliki appealed for international support in his weekly televised address, warning: "The battle will be long and will continue."

    "If we keep silent it means the creation of evil statelets that would wreak havoc with security in the region and the world."

    Meanwhile, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) warned that nearly 12,000 people displaced by the fighting were "enduring considerable hardship."

    "People are struggling to cope with the cold as blankets, mattresses and food are lacking," it said in a statement.

    Clashes erupted in Falluja and Ramadi after troops dismantled protest camps in the predominantly Sunni cities.

    Local Sunnis had been demonstrating for months against what they perceive as discrimination by the Shia-led government and unfair targeting of their minority community by anti-terrorism measures implemented to stem the surge in sectarian violence.


    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-25742184

  13. #13
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    Re: Dozens killed in Iraq bomb attacks

    Thanks to Blair and Bush Iraq is rid of all evil

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    Clashes, bombings kill six in Iraq



    BAGHDAD: Clashes between militants and government troops as well as two bombings at marketplaces have killed six people, Iraqi authorities said.

    Police and hospital officials said one bomb exploded Saturday inside a market in Baghdad's Madain area, killing three people and wounding nine others.

    They added that a double bombing near a market In the northern city of Kirkuk killed one and wounded 15.

    All officials spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorised to speak to media.

    Hospital officials said that overnight clashes between security forces and militants in Fallujah, a city west of Baghdad, left two people dead.

    Iraqi security forces and allied Sunni tribesmen have been trying to recapture territories overrun by Al Qaeda in western Anbar province, including Fallujah and parts of Ramadi city.
    http://www.dawn.com/news/1081122/cla...ll-six-in-iraq

  15. #15
    Member SavingFace's Avatar
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    Re: Clashes, bombings kill six in Iraq

    what sad waste of life. iraq is failing

  16. #16
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Re: Clashes, bombings kill six in Iraq

    RIP to the dead. sometimes I think that Saddam was not that bad at all when you see the current mess
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  17. #17
    Banned lal-topi-waala's Avatar
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    Re: Clashes, bombings kill six in Iraq

    US should have never left iraq

  18. #18
    Senior Member manuu's Avatar
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    ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad


    Militants of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) riding in a captured vehicle left behind by
    Iraqi security forces at an unknown location in the Salaheddin province. (AFP Photo)

    So, what is ISIS? And is it even ISIS, or is it ISIL?
    The world’s most committed and fanatical radical organization has only recently gone by its current name, after the unrecognized Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) was proclaimed in April last year. Al-Sham has been most commonly translated from Arabic as the Levant, hence ISIL. It was previously known as Jama’at al-Tawhid wal-Jihad, Al-Qaeda in the Islamic State of Iraq.

    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/800/1*UsdDwmqmhd5tst7OJxz4kg.jpeg[/IMG]
    The frequent name changes are not cosmetic — but the direct result of the transforming circumstances which have allowed ISIS to rapidly flourish. Initially focused on achieving dominance in Iraq, it was kept under control in the relatively calm period between the initial sectarian strife that broke out following the US-led invasion in 2003, and the outbreak of hostilities following the American military withdrawal in 2011.

    Since then, it has become a major player, receiving another critical boost when the civil war in Syria turned into a sectarian conflict, bringing in millions of dollars in funding and thousands of fresh recruits from around the world.

    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/800/1*GczpsgK8lug5X6EAM-cDNw.jpeg[/IMG]
    An image uploaded on June 14, 2014 on the jihadist website Welayat Salahuddin allegedly shows militants of the
    Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) driving on a street at unknown location in the Salaheddin province. (AFP Photo)

    Currently, ISIS strongholds extend from Raqqa in northern Syria all the way down to the outskirts of Baghdad — a stretch of more than 500 km, though the group doesn’t have comprehensive oversight of the roads and settlements between them.

    The speed with which the Islamist group is closing in on Baghdad can be compared — if not exceeds — the pace of the 2003 invasion. Unlike the US and allies, though, ISIS does not have a capability of launching destructive air strikes, however in its latest offensives the group has reportedly managed to significantly boost its military power capturing dozens of US-made armored vehicles and other heavy weaponry from the retreating Iraqi military.

    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/800/1*-7A-x1CxJ7VbPte0ILOyxA.jpeg[/IMG]​
    ISIS is part of and similar to Al-Qaeda, right?
    No, it is significantly worse. Al-Qaeda has been the touchstone for the Western understanding of terrorism ever since 9/11, but ISIS differs from it philosophically, organizationally, and even officially, as it has declared itself an entirely separate body. If anything the two organizations — though both espousing Sunni Islam — are currently more rivals than allies.

    While Al-Qaeda, in its most well-known forms, is a terrorist organization, with sleeper cells, training camps and terrorist attacks, ISIS as of now is more a militia and a rogue territory with its own infrastructure, more similar to Boko Haram and other localized fiefdoms that have spawned in lawless or failed African states.

    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/800/1*lBnRR_udUsnevVe4oLsGjw.jpeg[/IMG]
    An image uploaded on June 14, 2014 on the jihadist website Welayat Salahuddin allegedly shows militants of the
    Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) executing dozens of captured Iraqi security forces members at
    an unknown location in the Salaheddin province. (AFP Photo)

    Al-Qaeda has become more conscious of avoiding acts of indiscriminate or counter-productive brutality since the demise of Osama Bin Laden, but ISIS revels in it, espousing a religious philosophy so uncompromising it appears almost nihilistic.
    The areas it has secured have been kept under control by an endless stream of floggings, mutilations, beheadings and crucifixions. The targets can be well-chosen or arbitrary, but no one is spared — Shia opponents, Sunni rivals, captured soldiers or “immoral” women.

    Unsurprisingly, although the first leader of ISIS, the late Abu Musab, did swear fealty to Al-Qaeda back in the early 2000s, the two organizations have fallen out.

    The breaking point was the internecine fighting between ISIS and Al-Qaeda-backed Nusra in Syria. Pleas by Al-Qaeda to divide spheres of influence were flatly rejected by Abu Bakr, the ISIS leader, who spent four years in US captivity, before being released in 2009. After increasingly testy communication between the sides, Al-Qaeda “disowned” ISIS earlier this year, in return provoking ISIS to call the organization “traitors” and “a joke.”

    With the rise of ISIS, many say that it is now Al-Qaeda’s Ayman al-Zawahiri who should be pledging allegiance to the 43-year old Abu Bakr.

    How is ISIS funded?
    ISIS operates as a half-mafia-style commercial enterprise, half pious international charity, looking for wealthy donors in the Gulf States and throughout the globe.

    It is certainly not lacking in opportunism in commercializing its military activities. In 2012 ISIS — or ISI as it was then — took over oil fields in Syria, reaping profits from selling the oil at discounted prices to anyone willing to pay. It has traded in the raw materials in areas it has captured, and even dabbled in selling antiques from monuments under its control.

    Sometimes, it doesn’t have to be so elaborate. Its biggest single success was plundering a government vault in Mosul — captured last week — that reportedly contained more than $425 million. With the loot taken during its recent advances, ISIL’s estimated war chest now stands at over $2 billion.

    But just as important is ISIS income from its unknown — yet easily guessed — backers from the Arabian Peninsula. As the world’s foremost proponents of Saudi-style Wahhabism, Iraqi officials claim ISIS gets a steady stream of funds and support from politically engaged operators, working from the safety of Saudi Arabia’s and Qatar’s US-protected borders.

    Like any up-and-coming enterprise, its recent publicity and burgeoning reputation is likely to form a virtuous circle, where ISIS will receive additional funds, to wreak more impressive feats of destruction to the delight of its backers.

    How did ISIS manage to capture so much territory?
    On June 10, less than a thousand of ISIS militants on soft-shelled pickup trucks occupied the northern Iraqi city of Mosul with a population of 1.8 million people.

    The city was supposed to be under the protection of the US-trained Iraqi military force of about 30,000 stationed in the region. It was equipped with sophisticated US-made military equipment — part of the weaponry and hardware supplied by Washington to Baghdad, which has been estimated to cost billions of US dollars.

    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/800/1*Upif3LLWuzo1CjQ7VCGIsQ.jpeg[/IMG]
    An image made available by the jihadist Twitter account Al-Baraka news on June 13, 2014 allegedly shows
    Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) militants clashing with Iraqi soldiers at an undisclosed location close
    to the Iraqi-Syrian border, in the district of Sinjar, northwest Iraq. (AFP Photo)

    However, Mosul fell with no apparent resistance as scores of Iraqi troops fled dropping their uniforms and leaving the precious hardware behind. The militants celebrated getting US-made Humvees and tanks — some of which have since headed to Syria to be used against the government forces — and even allegedly captured at least one Black Hawk helicopter.
    General lack of morale and cohesion in the Iraqi army has been named the cause for the humiliating loss of this and other cities — including the strategic city of Tal Afar close to the Syrian border and Saddam Hussein’s birthplace Tikrit.

    Aiding this parade of ISIS victories has been the allegedly sweeping support of the local Sunni population, who previously supported the Sunni regime of Saddam Hussein overthrown by the US-led forces.

    Sectarian factors, but also the way the post-invasion Iraqi PM Nouri al-Maliki’s government has handled religious and social conflicts in the country, certainly contributed to Iraqi army being unpopular in ISIS-occupied regions. Apparently, replacing some Sunni commanders with Shiites locally did not help, and the way ISIS won the support of local tribes via negotiations has shown how little the new central government is valued in northern rural Iraq.



    However, one also has to realize that ISIS is no bunch of poorly-trained extremist thugs. With years of experience on the Syrian battlefield, the group boasts training camps producing well-prepared fighters, and it has been joined by scores of professionally trained overseas mercenaries.
    ISIS spokesman Shaykh Muhammad Adnani has explained the group’s current success by the will of God, saying that “the [Islamic] State has not prevailed by numbers, nor equipment, nor weapons, nor wealth, rather it prevails by Allah’s bounty alone, through its creed” in a recent statement posted on YouTube.

    It remains unclear for how long the brutal and repressive policies of ISIS will guarantee their support on the ground in Iraq, while they are trying to win the locals’ hearts with religious propaganda and dreams of a huge cross-border caliphate.

    [IMG]https://d262ilb51hltx0.cloudfront.net/max/800/1*Kdz_MAuWctILmjSZE8aSsw.jpeg[/IMG]

    It is ironic that the hardcore Islamist group will be using the equipment provided by Washington to Baghdad in the Western-backed insurgency in Syria, but at the same time may be confronted by the West in Iraq, where the militants are now contesting the country’s largest oilfield.

    Having spent billions on Iraq and war on terror for securing its own interests in the region, the US and its allies have been unwilling to admit the devastating 2003 invasion was a mistake with disastrous consequences for the whole Middle Eastern region. While 2013 was marked by the bloodiest sectarian violence in Iraq in five years, it mostly went unnoticed with the “international community.” Recently, the former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair chose to blame“bad systems of politics mixed with abuse of religion” as the root of all the problems in Middle East.


    https://medium.com/@AndersonLaMarca/...q-8d098f23ef67
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  19. #19
    Senior Member Pak92's Avatar
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    ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Forty Indian citizens working for a Turkish construction company near the Iraqi town of Mosul have been kidnapped, India's Foreign Ministry said Wednesday.

    Ministry spokesman Syed Akbaruddin said there had been no contact with the kidnappers, and no ransom demand had been received. Over the past week, militants have overrun Mosul and seized wide swathes of territory as they stormed toward the Iraqi capital of Baghdad.

    It was not immediately clear when the Indian workers were abducted. Akbaruddin said they were mostly from northern Indian states including Punjab, and had been working for the Tariq Noor al-Huda construction company in Iraq.

    Relatives in the Punjabi city of Amritsar said they had received phone calls from some of the Indian workers on Sunday, five days after Mosul was captured.

    Gurprender Kaur said her brother called and told her the workers were alone, in trouble and needed help. She did not give any further details about that call on Sunday, or say when she had last heard from him.

    Another woman cried and clutched a family photograph as she spoke with Indian journalists in Amritsar about her missing son.
    State govt in touch with families of abducted Indi … Play Video
    State govt in touch with families of abducted Indians …

    "Our children are in trouble. We want them back safe and sound," Ranjeet Kaur told Indian TV news agency NNIS. "We want the government to help us."

    There are about 10,000 Indian citizens working and living in Iraq, but only about 100 are in violent, insecure areas, Foreign Ministry spokesman Akbaruddin said.

    That includes 46 Indian nurses working in a hospital in the Iraqi town of Tikrit, but Akbaruddin said humanitarian organizations had been in touch with them and they were all safe.

    "We are willing to assist any of the nurses who wish to return to India," he said, adding that "several Indian nurses prefer to stay back" in Iraq. They have all been advised to avoid traveling by road.

    India sent a senior diplomat to Baghdad on Wednesday, and planned to bring back some citizens on Friday. The government also opened a call center to take phone calls from worried families with relatives in Iraq. By Wednesday afternoon, it had received 60 calls, he said.

    National TV station NDTV broadcast a recording of a phone call with one of the nurses in Tikrit on Tuesday.

    "We are afraid. We have no security here," a woman identified as nurse Marina Jose said over a crackling phone connection. "All the military, police, everybody escaped from here. Only we are here." She said the nurses were in touch with their families, most of whom are in the southern Indian state of Kerala.

    On Wednesday, Iraq's prime minister said Iraqi troops had launched a counteroffensive as the fighters, led by the al-Qaida breakaway group Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, laid siege to the country's main oil refinery.
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  20. #20
    Senior Member Hariz's Avatar
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    Obama To Send Up To 300 U.S. Military Advisers To Iraq

    President Obama said today he is prepared to send up to 300 U.S. military advisers to Iraq to assist in training and advising Iraqi forces as the tense situation in the country continues to escalate.

    In a statement in the White House briefing room, Obama said the U.S. is prepared to create joint operation centers between the U.S. and Iraq in Baghdad and northern Iraq.

    The president also said the U.S. is taking steps so that it's "prepared to take targeted and precise military action if and when we determine the situation on the ground requires it." The president said he would consult closely with Congress and leaders in Iraq before any decision is made.



    Here are some more details on the Special Forces troops President Obama has ordered to Iraq, according to senior U.S. officials:


    The first troops will arrive in Iraq “very soon” – they will come from forces already stationed in the Middle East.

    The troops will be divided into teams of a dozen each. The first teams will be sent to Baghdad and the surrounding areas, but ultimately will be stationed in northern Iraq as well. They will be embedded with the Iraqi military at senior levels – at first at the headquarter level, eventually at the brigade level. Others will be at new Joint Operation Centers with US and Iraqi troops.

    Not all 300 go right away. “Several” teams of one dozen trainers will go first, officials said.

    Their initial assignment will be to assess the capabilities and needs of the Iraqi forces. They will also add to the intelligence gathering capabilities. These troops would not be used to identify targets for possible future air strikes – but the officials did not rule out the possibility that they could help the Iraqis identify targets for air strikes.

    Intelligence gathering has been significantly ramped up – between manned and unmanned aircraft, they now have the capability to have 24 hour surveillance coverage.

    These troops will be covered by an immunity agreement of some kind – as are the handful of trainers already in Iraq.
    Obama also said Secretary of State John Kerry will travel to the Middle East and Europe where he will talk about the situation in Iraq.

    The president reiterated his pledge to not send combat boots back into Iraq.

    "We always have to guard against mission creep," the president said. "American combat troops are not going to be fighting in Iraq again."

    Before the announcement, Obama met with his national security team at the White House. The president huddled with congressional leaders at the White House on Wednesday where he told the lawmakers he would not need congressional authorization to carry out any of the actions he was considering at the time.

    Earlier in the week, the president Congress that he was deploying up to 275 military personnel to provide support and security for the embassy in Baghdad.

    http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics...ction-in-iraq/
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