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Thread: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

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  1. #41
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Iraq crisis: Fierce battles for Baiji and Tal Afar

    Islamist-led militants and pro-government forces are engaged in fierce battles for the Baiji oil refinery and Tal Afar airport in northern Iraq.

    Baiji, Iraq's biggest refinery, is surrounded by the rebels, who say they have seized most of Tal Afar airport.

    The fighting comes a day after the US said it would send some 300 military advisers to help the fight against the insurgents.

    President Barack Obama stressed that US troops would not fight in Iraq.

    US Secretary of State John Kerry is expected to travel to Iraq soon to press for a more representative cabinet, hoping this could ease tensions between the country's rival Muslim sects.

    The country's highest Shia religious authority, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, has called for a new government to be set up quickly now the results of recent elections have been ratified.

    He said a new government needed to aim for "broad national acceptance" and to "remedy past mistakes".

    Correspondents say that will be seen by many as criticism of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki.

    Mr Maliki has been accused of pursuing anti-Sunni policies, pushing some Sunni militants to join the jihadist Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (Isis), which has made rapid advances in recent days.

    About 500,000 people have fled their homes in the country's second-largest city, Mosul, which Isis captured last week.

    The UN estimates that that brings to about one million the number of people displaced within Iraq as a result of violence this year.

    President Obama's statement wasn't the lifeline the Iraqi government had hoped for. They wanted immediate airstrikes to stop Isis in its tracks.

    Instead, they will get up to 300 military advisers, who will restore the backbone to the Iraqi National Army which it has been missing since the Americans withdrew. The promise of air strikes is there, but attacks by US planes or missiles will, it seems, be dependent on some clear improvement in the way Iraq is governed - even though Mr Obama wouldn't say so.

    He believes Prime Minister Nouri Maliki has endangered Iraq by ignoring Sunni concerns and governing in the interests of the Shia majority. Mr Maliki's supporters deny this and say he won't resign, but rivals to him are said to be emerging.

    The least Mr Maliki will have to do is create a new and more inclusive government. Only then, perhaps, will the bombing start.

    Can US military advisers ease crisis?

    line
    Isis says it has downed two military helicopters around the Baiji refinery but this has not been independently confirmed.

    The BBC's Jim Muir in Irbil, northern Iraq, says it is thought the militants may have captured part of the vast oil complex.

    They have also seized a disused chemical weapons factory in Muthanna, 70km (45 miles) north-west of the capital, Baghdad.

    The US says it does not believe the site contains any material that the insurgents could use to make chemical weapons.

    But state department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said: "We remain concerned about the seizure of any military site by" Isis.

    Iraq has asked the US for air strikes against the Sunni militants.

    Mr Obama said the US was prepared for "targeted and precise military action, if and when" required, but he insisted there was "no military solution" to the crisis.

    He also pointedly urged the Shia-led Iraqi government to be "inclusive".

    "The United States will not pursue military actions that support one sect inside of Iraq at the expense of another," Mr Obama said.

    Isis grew out of an al-Qaeda-linked organisation in Iraq

    Estimated 10,000 fighters in Iraq and Syria
    Joined in its offensives by other Sunni militant groups, including Saddam-era officers and soldiers, and disaffected Sunni tribal fighters
    Exploits standoff between Iraqi government and the minority Sunni Arab community, which complains that Shia Prime Minister Nouri Maliki is monopolising power
    Isis led by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, an obscure figure regarded as a battlefield commander and tactician
    Jihadi groups around the world

    line
    In addition to sending advisers, Mr Obama said that the US would be increasing intelligence efforts and setting up "joint operation centres in Baghdad and northern Iraq".

    On Wednesday, the chairman of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen Martin Dempsey, warned that the US military still lacked sufficient intelligence to launch air strikes. He told a congressional hearing that pilots would have difficulty knowing who they were attacking from the air.

    Sunnis and Shia share fundamental beliefs, but differ in doctrine, ritual, law, theology and religious organisation
    The origins of the split lie in a dispute over who should have succeeded the Prophet Muhammad as leader of the Muslim community
    Sunnis are the majority sect in the Muslim world, but Shia, most of them ethnic Arabs, form between 60% and 65% of Iraq's population; Sunnis make up 32-37%, split between Arabs and Kurds
    Sunni Arabs dominated Iraq under Saddam Hussein and their persecution of the Shia stoked sectarian tensions; the US-led invasion in 2003 gave the Shia an opportunity to seek redress
    Nouri Maliki has been accused of denying Sunni Arabs meaningful representation and pursuing security policies that target them

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-27936652

  2. #42
    Senior Member Mazea's Avatar
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    Petraeus: US should bomb Iraqi militants

    Former commander of US forces in Iraq David Petraeus says the United States should launch targeted airstrikes against the al-Qaeda-linked militant group in Iraq.

    "We must be careful not to take sides if we offer military support. But the growing threat posed by ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant, or ISIL) means that military action will be necessary," the retired general told the Daily Telegraph newspaper on Friday.

    "We must realize that ISIS poses a threat not only to Iraq but to the UK and other countries as well," he added.

    The militants have been wreaking havoc in Iraq over the past days. This has forced the Iraqi government to call for US help in its fight against the Takfiri militants.

    "It seems to be much more than a terrorist group: it seems to be turning into a terrorist army, one that has acquired vast financial resources from looting banks and other criminal enterprises," Petraeus said.

    "If President Obama and other leaders conclude that the threat posed by ISIS is significant then I would support actions to target high-value ISIS elements."

    "If ISIS is seen as a terrorist organization with the potential to engage in terrorist acts beyond the Middle East, then that could warrant the targeting of high value targets," he said.

    President Obama said he was reviewing military options to help the Iraqi government fight the militants.

    Meanwhile, the Pentagon ordered three warships to move into the Persian Gulf to provide Obama with options should he decide to launch airstrikes against the militants.

    AGB/AGB

  3. #43
    Senior Member Felix's Avatar
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    Re: Petraeus: US should bomb Iraqi militants

    Indeed they should bomb those that they have been supporting.

  4. #44
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Iraq crisis: Shia militia show of force raises tensions

    Thousands of Shia militia loyal to the powerful cleric Moqtada al-Sadr have paraded through the streets of Baghdad, raising sectarian tensions amid continued fighting in areas of Iraq.

    The cleric, whose Mehdi Army fought the US in Iraq for years, had called for a military parade across the country.

    Correspondents say the show of force will be seen as a very disturbing development by the Baghdad government.

    Sunni extremists have seized control of large swathes of territory across Iraq.

    On Saturday, officials admitted that the militants - led by jihadist group Isis - had seized a strategically important border crossing to Syria, near the town of Qaim, killing 30 troops after a day-long battle.

    The capture of the crossing in western Iraq could help Isis transport weapons and other equipment to different battlefields, analysts say.

    Thousands of largely Shia Iraqis have volunteered to fight Isis, urged on by a call from the country's highest Shia religious authority, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani.

    But the BBC's Jim Muir, in northern Iraq, says the impressive-looking parade of men in battle fatigues accompanied by serious military hardware will only raise sectarian tensions at at time when the government is under pressure to rally the country together against the extremists.

    line
    Analysis from the BBC's Jim Muir in Irbil
    While keeping up the pressure on Baghdad from the north, where there is constant skirmishing in a belt roughly 70km (43 miles) from the capital, the militant Sunni rebels now seem to be preparing for a thrust from the west.

    As well as taking the border crossing at Qaim, the rebels also say they have taken the nearby town of Qaim itself, as well as Rawa, about 70km to the east, the next stop on the Euphrates as it winds its way towards Baghdad.

    South-east of Rawa, the town of Aneh also apparently fell to the militants without combat, and the Iraqi army's regional command HQ nearby is said to be surrounded.

    Anbar province is heavily tribal, and the rebels say they are negotiating the handover of towns and villages without bloodshed in co-operation with local tribes.

    Since January, they already control the town of Falluja, only 30km from Baghdad, and much of the regional capital Ramadi, about 40km further west.

    The militants seem to be trying to connect up these two pockets and secure control of the whole Euphrates valley from the Syrian border to Baghdad.

    Two government-held towns, Hit and Haditha, stand in their way along a 140km stretch of the river between Aneh and Ramadi.

    If the rebels can join up those two areas and take full control in Ramadi, they would be in a position to prepare for an assault on the western approaches to Baghdad, using Falluja as the springboard.

    Iraq's sectarian split

    Sunnis and Shia share fundamental beliefs, but differ in doctrine, ritual, law, theology and religious organisation
    The origins of the split lie in a dispute over who should have succeeded the Prophet Muhammad as leader of the Muslim community
    Sunnis are the majority sect in the Muslim world, but Shia, most of them ethnic Arabs, form between 60% and 65% of Iraq's population; Sunnis make up 32-37%, split between Arabs and Kurds

    Sunni Arabs dominated Iraq under Saddam Hussein and their persecution of the Shia stoked sectarian tensions; the US-led invasion in 2003 gave the Shia an opportunity to seek redress
    Nouri Maliki has been accused of denying Sunni Arabs meaningful representation and pursuing security policies that target them

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-27953312

  5. #45
    Senior Member Wattan's Avatar
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    Obama warns U.S. firepower won't unify Iraq‏

    U.S. President Barack Obama has warned that no amount of U.S. firepower could keep Iraq together if its political leaders did not disdain sectarianism and work to unite the country.

    Obama told CNN Friday, a day after announcing the dispatch of 300 special forces advisors to Iraq following a lightning advance by extreme Sunni radicals, that American sacrifices had given Iraq a chance at a stable democracy, but it had been squandered.

    "There's no amount of American firepower that's going to be able to hold the country together," Obama said in an interview.

    "I made that very clear to [Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri al-] Maliki and all of the other leadership inside of Iraq."

    "We gave Iraq the chance to have an inclusive democracy. To work across sectarian lines to provide a better future for their children. And unfortunately what we've seen is a breakdown of trust," Obama said.

    Washington has pointedly declined to endorse Prime Minister al-Maliki, a Shiite, who is blamed here for failing to reach out to the Sunni community in the two-and-a-half years since US troops left, thus laying the conditions for the current crisis.

    Obama is warning that only a new effort to frame an "inclusive" political system by Iraqi leaders will keep the country together and repel the challenge from Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) fighters who have seized several key cities in Iraq, including Mosul.

    Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, the most respected voice for Iraq's Shiite majority, also mounted pressure on Maliki to seek an exit to the crisis via a political solution.

    He called on Maliki to form an inclusive government or step aside.

    His thinly veiled reproach was the most influential to place blame on the Shiite prime minister for the nation's spiraling crisis.

    The focus on the need to replace Maliki comes as Iraq faces its worst crisis since the withdrawal of U.S. troops in 2011.

    Over the past two weeks, Iraq has lost a big chunk of the north to the Al-Qaeda-inspired Sunni militants of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, whose lightning offensive led to the capture of Mosul, the nation's second-largest city.

    The gravity of the crisis has forced the usually reclusive al-Sistani, who normally stays above the political fray, to wade into politics, and his comments, delivered through a representative, could ultimately seal Maliki's fate.

    Calling for a dialogue between the political coalitions that won seats in the April 30 parliamentary election, Sistani said it was imperative that they form "an effective government that enjoys broad national support, avoids past mistakes and opens new horizons toward a better future for all Iraqis."

    Deeply revered by Iraq's majority Shiites, Sistani's critical words could force Maliki, who emerged from relative obscurity in 2006 to lead the country, to step down.

    On Thursday, Obama stopped short of calling for al-Maliki to resign, but his carefully worded comments did all but that. "Only leaders that can govern with an inclusive agenda are going to be able to truly bring the Iraqi people together and help them through this crisis," Obama declared at the White House.

    The Iranian-born Sistani, believed to be 86, lives in the Shiite holy city of Najaf, south of Baghdad, where he rarely ventures out of his modest house on a narrow alley near the city's Imam Ali shrine and does not give media interviews.

    His call to arms last week prompted thousands of Shiites to volunteer to fight against the Sunni militants who now control a large swath of territory astride both sides of the Iraq-Syria border.

    The extent of al-Sistani's influence was manifested in the years following the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq when he forced Washington to modify its blueprint for the country and agree to the election of a constituent assembly that drafted the nation's constitution.

    For the past two years, he has shunned politicians of all sects, refusing to receive any of them to show his disillusionment with the way they run the country. However, the danger posed by the Islamic State militants appears to have forced him to say more.

    His call to arms has given the fight against the Sunni insurgents the feel of a religious war between Shiites and Sunnis. His office in Najaf dismissed that charge, with his representative, Ahmed al-Safi, saying Friday: "The call for volunteers targeted Iraqis from all groups and sects. ... It did not have a sectarian basis and cannot be."

    Al-Maliki's State of Law bloc won the most seats in the April vote, but his hopes to retain his job are in doubt with rivals challenging him from within the broader Shiite alliance. In order to govern, his bloc must first form a majority coalition in the new 328-seat legislature, which must meet by June 30.

    If al-Maliki were to relinquish his post now, according to the constitution the president, Jalal Talabani, a Kurd, would assume the job until a new prime minister is elected. But the ailing Talabani has been in Germany for treatment since 2012, so his deputy, Khudeir al-Khuzaie, a Shiite, would step in for him.

    Al-Maliki's Shiite-led government long has faced criticism of discriminating against Iraq's Sunni and Kurdish populations. But it is his perceived marginalization of the once-dominant Sunnis that sparked violence reminiscent of Iraq's darkest years of sectarian warfare in 2006 and 2007.

    Shiite politicians familiar with the secretive efforts to remove al-Maliki said two names mentioned as replacements are former vice president Adel Abdul-Mahdi, a Shiite and French-educated economist, and Ayad Allawi, a secular Shiite who served as Iraq's first prime minister after Saddam Hussein's ouster. Others include Ahmad Chalabi, a one-time Washington favorite to lead Iraq, and Bayan Jabr, another Shiite who served as finance and interior minister under al-Maliki.

    Nearly three years after he heralded the end of America's war in Iraq, Obama announced Thursday he was deploying up to 300 military advisers to help quell the insurgency. They join some 275 troops in and around Iraq to provide security and support for the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad and other American interests.

    But the U.S. leader was adamant that U.S. troops would not be returning to combat.

    Obama has held off approving the airstrikes sought by the Iraqi government, though he says he could still approve "targeted and precise" strikes if the situation required it and if U.S. intelligence gathering identified potential targets.

    Manned and unmanned U.S. aircraft are now flying over Iraq 24 hours a day on intelligence missions, U.S. officials say.

    A Shiite politician close to Maliki said Obama did not offer enough to help Iraq at its hour of need.

    "His plan does not rise up to the level of Iraqi-U.S. relations. His message is clear: America is not ready to fight terrorism," said the official, speaking to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the subject.

    Another Shiite, cleric Nassir al-Saedi, warned that the 300 advisers would be attacked. Al-Saedi is loyal to anti-U.S. cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, whose Mahdi Army militia fought the Americans during their eight-year presence in Iraq.

    http://english.alarabiya.net/en/News...on-unity-.html

  6. #46
    Banned alihamza's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    This Iraqi politician so eloquently describes the situation in the country. Wish Maliki had half his brains:

    Iraqi Politician: Obama Is Supporting ISIS in Syria – Will He Support ISIS in Iraq Too? (Video)





    Ayad Jamal Al-Din: I was very surprised by the American statement, which pledged to support Iraq in keeping with the strategic agreement. On the same day, the U.S. declared that it would weaken… The war in Syria and the war in Iraq are one and the same – both in Syria and in Iraq, it is a war against ISIS. The U.S. strives to weaken the Syrian regime, and this benefits ISIS, but in Baghdad, it supports the regime against ISIS. This is suspicious and perplexing, to tell you the truth.

    As for the collapse of the Iraqi army in Mosul – the army is a reflection of its commander. It is Nouri Al-Maliki, the prime minister and general commander of the armed forces, who should be placed on trial for high treason. The military personnel are not responsible for the collapse in Mosul and elsewhere. It is the general commander who should be held accountable and stand trial.

    The ISIS problem is an old one. It was not born today. It is inappropriate to justify ISIS. In the past two hours, I’ve heard several commentators here on Al-Arabiya TV, saying that the Iraqi Sunnis are persecuted and are denied their rights, and that that is why ISIS has managed to gain a foothold in the country.

    ISIS is composed of the same terrorists who are fighting in Libya, in Somalia, in Syria, in Afghanistan, in Nigeria, and elsewhere. The names of the organizations may vary, but their terrorism is one and the same.

    Commentators should avoid justifying this terrorism. Terrorism is terrorism, and its confrontation should be the same everywhere. It is PM Nouri Al-Maliki himself who should be held accountable. I believe that if there was a parliament of decent human beings in Iraq, Al-Maliki would be voted out of office and would face trial for high treason for bringing about this military collapse – either because he failed or due to his collaboration with the terrorists…

    …Interviewer: How do you view the [American] support for the military operation and Washington’s offer to help resolve this crisis?

    Ayad Jamal Al-Din: I welcome it. We await this support, but it must extend to all the areas where ISIS may be found. The pressure on the Syrian regime, which is fighting ISIS, must be lifted. They should not try to strengthen the feeble Free Syrian Army [FSA]. There is no FSA. There is ISIS in Syria and Iraq. You cannot fight ISIS in Iraq, yet support it in Syria. There is one war and one enemy.

    The U.S. should give up its hypocrisy. People are not brainless. How can it be that a State Department spokesperson talks about Iraq, and then a White House spokesman says: “We must pressure the [Syrian] regime so that it surrenders”? Surrenders to whom? To ISIS. Where is the FSA? There is no such thing. The war is one and the same. Support should be extended to both Iraq and Syria. The U.S. should pressure the countries that sponsor ISIS.

    An hour ago, when I entered this studio, Al-Jazeera TV was still calling ISIS “the tribal rebels.” This is a deception, a lie. These are no tribal rebels. The tribal rebels have fled to Kurdistan. The Sunnis were vanquished by ISIS. These are criminals, murderers, and terrorists.

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2014...Speed=noscript

  7. #47
    Senior Member kashifraza's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Iraq crisis: Militants 'seize more towns along Euphrates'

    Sunni militants say they have seized a strategically important border crossing and two towns along the Euphrates river in continued fighting in Iraq.

    Officials admitted that the militants had seized the border crossing to Syria near the town of Qaim, killing 30 troops after a day-long battle.

    Rebels also said they had taken the towns of Rawa and Aneh.

    Correspondents say a campaign along the river may eventually lead to an assault on Baghdad from the west.

    The capture of the Qaim crossing in western Iraq could help Isis transport weapons and other equipment to different battlefields, analysts say.

    Sunni extremists have seized control of large areas of territory across Iraq in recent days.

    They claim to have seized parts of Iraq's largest oil refinery, at Baiji, and have also taken a disused chemical weapons factory in Muthanna, 70km (45 miles) north-west of Baghdad.

    On Saturday the government again denied that militants had gained access to parts of the Baiji refinery but did admit the army was facing "violent attacks" from gunmen.



    Analysis from the BBC's Jim Muir in Irbil
    While keeping up the pressure on Baghdad from the north, where there is constant skirmishing in a belt roughly 70km (43 miles) from the capital, the militant Sunni rebels now seem to be preparing for a thrust from the west.

    As well as taking the border crossing at Qaim, the rebels also say they have taken the nearby town of Qaim itself, as well as Rawa, about 70km to the east, the next stop on the Euphrates as it winds its way towards Baghdad.

    South-east of Rawa, the town of Aneh also apparently fell to the militants without combat, and the Iraqi army's regional command HQ nearby is said to be surrounded.

    Anbar province is heavily tribal, and the rebels say they are negotiating the handover of towns and villages without bloodshed in co-operation with local tribes.

    Since January, they already control the town of Falluja, only 30km from Baghdad, and much of the regional capital Ramadi, about 40km further west.

    The militants seem to be trying to connect up these two pockets and secure control of the whole Euphrates valley from the Syrian border to Baghdad.

    Two government-held towns, Hit and Haditha, stand in their way along a 140km stretch of the river between Aneh and Ramadi.

    If the rebels can join up those two areas and take full control in Ramadi, they would be in a position to prepare for an assault on the western approaches to Baghdad, using Falluja as the springboard.

    Shia cleric Moqtada al-Sadr has rallied followers to join a military parade across Iraq, as Jonathan Beale reports from Baghdad
    Also on Saturday, thousands of Shia militia loyal to the powerful cleric Moqtada al-Sadr paraded through the streets of Baghdad.

    The cleric, whose Mehdi Army fought the US in Iraq for years, had called for a military parade across the country.

    Correspondents say the show of force will be seen as a very disturbing development by the Baghdad government.

    The impressive-looking parade of men in battle fatigues accompanied by serious military hardware will only raise sectarian tensions at at time when the government is under pressure to rally the country together against the extremists, our correspondent reports.

    US Secretary of State John Kerry is expected to travel to Iraq soon to press for a more representative cabinet, hoping this could ease tensions between the country's rival Muslim sects.

    Iraq's sectarian split



    Sunnis and Shia share fundamental beliefs, but differ in doctrine, ritual, law, theology and religious organisation
    The origins of the split lie in a dispute over who should have succeeded the Prophet Muhammad as leader of the Muslim community
    Sunnis are the majority sect in the Muslim world, but Shia, most of them ethnic Arabs, form between 60% and 65% of Iraq's population; Sunnis make up 32-37%, split between Arabs and Kurds
    Sunni Arabs dominated Iraq under Saddam Hussein and their persecution of the Shia stoked sectarian tensions; the US-led invasion in 2003 gave the Shia an opportunity to seek redress
    Nouri Maliki has been accused of denying Sunni Arabs meaningful representation and pursuing security policies that target them
    Sunnis and Shias: What's the story?

    Jeremy Bowen: Why Sunni-Shia tensions have returned

    Iraq crisis: Voices from Iraq

    line
    Meanwhile, US President Barack Obama said Isis - which has an estimated 10,000 fighters in Iraq and Syria - had exploited a power vacuum in Syria to amass arms and resources, but denied this was because the US had not moved to back moderate rebel forces fighting President Bashar Assad.

    The US, which pulled out of Iraq in 2011, is sending some 300 military advisers to Iraq to help in the fight against the insurgents there.

    But in the face of Iraqi calls for US air strikes, the White House is insisting that there is no purely military solution to the crisis.

    Correspondents say Mr Obama believes Iraqi PM Nouri Maliki has endangered the country by ignoring Sunni concerns and governing in the interests of the Shia majority.

    The UN estimates that about one million people have been displaced within Iraq as a result of violence this year.

    About 500,000 people fled their homes in the country's second-largest city, Mosul, which Isis captured last week.

    Isis grew out of an al-Qaeda-linked organisation in Iraq

    Estimated 10,000 fighters in Iraq and Syria
    Joined in its offensives by other Sunni militant groups, including Saddam-era officers and soldiers, and disaffected Sunni tribal fighters
    Exploits standoff between Iraqi government and the minority Sunni Arab community, which complains that Shia Prime Minister Nouri Maliki is monopolising power
    Isis led by Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, an obscure figure regarded as a battlefield commander and tactician
    Jihadi groups around the world



    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-27960142
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    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    More than $750 billion spent on US-Iraq war and we end up with ISIS?

    Well done Amreeka!
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  9. #49
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Iraq 'struggling' against Isis militants, say diplomats



    Iraq's government is struggling in its battle against militants, diplomats and politicians have told the BBC.

    Fighters from the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (Isis) said they seized a border crossing to Syria and two towns in north-west Iraq on Saturday.

    Correspondents say Isis appears to be better trained, better equipped and more experienced than the army.

    The Sunni extremists attacked the city of Mosul in June and have since seized large swathes of territory across Iraq.

    There is deep pessimism in Baghdad about the way the government's war against Isis is going, says the BBC's World Affairs Editor John Simpson, who has been speaking to senior politicians and diplomats in the capital.

    The Iraqi air force ran out of American Hellfire missiles two weeks ago, and in any case only has two Cessna planes capable of firing Hellfires, he adds.

    Experts say Isis has established secure safe havens, including some in neighbouring Syria, which will be difficult to target.

    Sectarian tensions
    On Saturday, Iraqi officials admitted that Isis had seized a border crossing near the town of Qaim, killing 30 troops after a day-long battle.

    Rebels also said they had taken the towns of Rawa and Aneh along the Euphrates river.

    Correspondents say a campaign along the river may eventually lead to an assault on Baghdad from the west.

    The capture of the Qaim crossing in western Iraq could also help Isis transport weapons and other equipment to different battlefields, analysts say.

    Extremist fighters claim to have seized parts of Iraq's largest oil refinery, at Baiji, and have also taken a disused chemical weapons factory in Muthanna, 70km (45 miles) north-west of Baghdad.

    The government denied that militants had gained access to parts of the Baiji refinery but said the army was facing "violent attacks" from gunmen.

    Also on Saturday, thousands of Shia militia loyal to the powerful cleric Moqtada al-Sadr paraded through the streets of Baghdad.

    The cleric, whose Mehdi Army fought the US in Iraq for years, had called for a military parade across the country.



    Correspondents say the show of force will be seen as a very disturbing development by the Baghdad government as the parade will only raise sectarian tensions at a time when the government is under pressure to rally the country together against the extremists.

    US Secretary of State John Kerry is expected to travel to Iraq soon to press for a more representative cabinet, hoping this could ease tensions between the country's rival Muslim sects.

    The US, which pulled out of Iraq in 2011, is sending some 300 military advisers to Iraq to help in the fight against the insurgents there.

    But in the face of Iraqi calls for US air strikes, the White House is insisting that there is no purely military solution to the crisis.

    Correspondents say Mr Obama believes Iraqi PM Nouri Maliki has endangered the country by ignoring Sunni concerns and governing in the interests of the Shia majority.
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-27960142
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    Senior Member ManojKumar's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    More than $750 billion spent on US-Iraq war and we end up with ISIS?

    Well done Amreeka!

    Who would you say is responsible for the ISIS? I mean financially?
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  11. #51
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Quote Originally Posted by ManojKumar View Post
    Who would you say is responsible for the ISIS? I mean financially?
    I think it is the same countries that are funding the Al-Nusra branch of Al-Qaeda in Syria: namely Saudi Arabia, and possibly Qatar and a couple of other countries.
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  12. #52
    Senior Member Mazea's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    ISIL, US project to subjugate Mideast: Analyst

    The ongoing offensive by the Takfiri militants in Iraq is the continuation of the US project to dominate the Persian Gulf region, an analyst writes for Press TV.

    “[US] neoconservatives had long sought to dominate the Persian Gulf and use it as a launch pad in their grand strategy of global dominance… Sectarian division eliminated resistance to the plan. The ISIL is that continuation,” Soraya Sepahpour-Ulrich wrote in a column for the Press TV website.

    The analyst’s comments come against the backdrop of acts of terror by the so-called the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) in Iraq.

    She said the ISIL activities “would also justify” the US presence for combating “terrorists” with a view to dominating the “Persian Gulf region as planned.”

    Sepahpour-Ulrich said the US and its allies initially armed the “ISIL terrorists in Syria” to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad and “drag Iran (and Hezbollah) into this quagmire with the intention of bleeding all sides.”

    "But Iran and Syria were only part of the equation. America had global designs,” wrote the analyst.

    Sepahpour-Ulrich said Washington has long used “terrorism” as its “weapon of choice.”

    The ISIL militants have overrun most of one province and parts of three others north of Baghdad. The terrorists also captured four cities as well as a border crossing with Syria during Friday and Saturday clashes in Anbar Province.

    Days ago, Iraq’s top Shia cleric, Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani, called for the people to join the battle against the terrorists and defend the country. Iraqi media say more than two million people have so far voiced their readiness to join the fight.

    Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki has repeatedly blamed Saudi Arabia and Qatar for the security crisis and growing terrorism in his country, and denounced the Al Saud regime as a major supporter of global terrorism.

    KA/HMV/SL

  13. #53
    Senior Member manuu's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Quote Originally Posted by bilalhaider View Post
    I think it is the same countries that are funding the Al-Nusra branch of Al-Qaeda in Syria: namely Saudi Arabia, and possibly Qatar and a couple of other countries.
    What a complete mess. This seems to have gone full circle.

  14. #54
    Senior Member Mazea's Avatar
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    ‘In Iraq the US is getting exactly what it wants’

    Caleb Maupin is a political analyst who lives in New York City, and is an activist with the International

    Iraqi Shi'ite Turkmen fighters take part in an intensive security deployment in the town of Taza, south of the northern oil city of Kirkuk, June 19, 2014. (Reuters)Iraqi Shi'ite Turkmen fighters take part in an intensive security deployment in the town of Taza, south of the northern oil city of Kirkuk,

    The US wants no stable force in the Middle East, no opposition, no basis for anything that could become a stable economy, exporting oil and competing with it on the world markets, political analyst Caleb Maupin told RT.

    RT:Obama said the US troops won't be going back into combat on the ground in Iraq. Will he keep his promise?

    Caleb Maupin: Many US military adventures began with so-called military advisors. The classic example is Vietnam. In recent history we have seen many examples of the US using so-called military advisors to advise local officials who actually do the fighting on behalf of the US. What’s very clear in the Iraq situation right now is that the US is attempting to form a sectarian war, not only in Iraq but in the entire Middle East. ISIS/ISIL is an organization that receives support from Saudi Arabia and the Gulf states that ally with the US and have worked to form and fund this kind of extremist terrorist organization and send them to Syria, engaging in civil war, and now they are in Iraq. This fighting is very helpful to the US because it makes sure that there is no stable opposition to the US and there are no stable competitors in the world market. The US wants chaos in the Middle East and this latest episode with the ISIS and sending advisors is an example of the US achieving its aim of chaos, fighting and leaving instability in the Middle East in order to remove competitors in the oil market.

    RT: Around 300 so-called military advisers have been sent by Washington to Iraq. Are they really just advisers?

    CM: Military advisors in Africa and different parts of the world that the US sends, they generally play the role of organizing proxy forces, forces that do what the US wants to be done. They kind of play a central role in directing them, telling them where to go. 300 military advisors could get quite a bit done in order to achieve the aims that the Pentagon would like to achieve. They work with local forces and give them a direction, that’s what generally the military advisors do.

    RT: The US President also stressed the Iraq crisis should be solved politically… Hasn't the situation already passed that point?

    CM: Absolutely. The US is attempting to ferment a sectarian civil war throughout the Middle East and it is achieving it very effectively. The support for ISIS from Saudi Arabia, the fighting now between the ISIS and the Maliki government – this is exactly what the US wants. It wants no stable force in the Middle East, no opposition, no basis for anything that could become a stable economy, exporting oil and competing with the US on the world markets. This is the US getting exactly what it wants.

    The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of RT.

    http://rt.com/op-edge/167304-iraq-us...-sectarianism/

  15. #55
    Senior Member Wattan's Avatar
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    Convoy of Iraqi PM Nouri al-Maliki gets demolished

    A video uploaded to YouTube on Friday shows a completely destroyed convoy - allegedly belonging to Iraq’s Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

    The video seems to be taken from a moving car, which passes by destroyed and damaged vehicles on the side of the road.


    Sunday, 22 June 2014

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  16. #56
    Junior Member Padishah's Avatar
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    Re: Convoy of Iraqi PM Nouri al-Maliki gets demolished

    His convoy was destroyed but he got away?

  17. #57
    Senior Member Amjad Hussain's Avatar
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    Re: Convoy of Iraqi PM Nouri al-Maliki gets demolished

    Quote Originally Posted by Padishah View Post
    His convoy was destroyed but he got away?
    I think mean his convoy as in Iraqi army convoy but I agree it look misleading. I doubt he would get into such a situation
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  18. #58
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Sunni militants 'seize Iraq's western border crossings'

    The Iraqi government appears to have lost control of its western borders after Sunni militants reportedly captured crossings to Syria and Jordan.

    Officials said the rebels took two key crossings in Anbar on Sunday, a day after seizing one at Qaim, a town in the province that borders Syria.

    The strategically important airport in the northern town of Tal Afar has also reportedly fallen to the rebels.

    Isis-led militants have cut a swathe through parts of Iraq.

    Since the fall of Mosul in early June, Isis - the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant - have helped win large areas in the west and north.

    They have taken four strategically important towns in the predominantly Sunni Anbar province - Qaim, Rutba, Rawa and Anah - in the last two days.

    Gunmen reportedly captured the border posts of al-Waleed, on the Syrian frontier, and Turaibil, on the Jordanian border, on Sunday after government forces pulled out.

    The capture of frontier crossings could help Isis transport weapons and other equipment to different battlefields, analysts say.



    The BBC's Jim Muir in Irbil
    After a bit of a pause and some patchy fighting in a belt around 70km (45 miles) north and north-east of Baghdad, the Sunni rebels seem to be on the move again.

    The focus has shifted partly to Anbar, the vast, mainly Sunni-populated province to the west of Baghdad, an area where the tribes are particularly strong.

    The reported fall of two more border posts, one on the main road to Jordan, and the other to Syria, means that the government has lost control of all its western borders.

    One tribal leader said that 90% of the province is now in rebel hands.

    Even before the current crisis began, the city of Falluja, barely 30km from Baghdad's western edge, had been held by rebels since January, along with half of the provincial capital Ramadi.

    In many places, troops and police seem to have left their posts after being given safe passage by the militants, to avoid bloodshed.

    If reports of the capture of the important airport at the strategic northern town of Tal Afar are confirmed, it would be bad news for the Baghdad government, which had been hoping to use the airport as a launching-pad for an attempt to recapture the nearby city of Mosul.

    line
    The funeral of a senior army officer who was killed in the fighting for Qaim on Friday was targeted by a suicide and car bomb attack in Ramadi. At least six people were killed as they gathered to mourn Brig Gen Majid al-Fahdawi.

    US 'stooges'

    Iran's supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei said on Sunday he opposed any US intervention, and accused Washington of "seeking an Iraq under its hegemony and ruled by its stooges".

    "The main dispute in Iraq is between those who want Iraq to join the US camp and those who seek an independent Iraq," he said, dismissing talk of sectarianism.

    The US, which pulled out of Iraq in 2011, is deploying some 300 military advisers to Iraq to help in the fight against the insurgents.

    line
    Analysis from BBC Persian's Bozorgmehr Sharafedin
    The Obama administration is signalling that it wants a new government in Iraq without Prime Minister Nouri Maliki before launching any attack on Isis, but Iran's Supreme Leader has rejected both ideas.

    Ayatollah Khamenei strongly opposed "the intervention of the US and others in the domestic affairs of Iraq", and said the US is not pleased with the results of the new election and "is seeking an Iraq under its hegemony and ruled by its stooges".

    Khamenei's anti-US remarks weaken the possibility of co-operation. Iran feels it has the upper hand in Iraq and would try to resolve the crisis by the help of "Iraqi people, government and Shia clerics".

    line
    US Secretary of State John Kerry, speaking in Cairo on Sunday, urged Iraq's leaders "to rise above sectarian motivations and form a government that is united in its determination to meet the needs and speak to the demands of all of their people".

    He said it was a "critical moment" and warned that Isis' "ideology of violence and repression is a threat not only to Iraq but to the entire region".

    Sunni tribal leaders in Anbar say Isis militants make up only a small number of the fighters involved in taking over the province - most are tribes people and former security personnel from the Saddam Hussein era.

    Shaikh Raad al-Suleiman, a senior figure in Ramadi, said the reason they had captured so much territory was because soldiers in the Iraqi army were not prepared to fight.

    "Most of the officers and men came to their senses, left their arms, guns and vehicles and fled out of Anbar," he said.


    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-27966774
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  19. #59
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Quote Originally Posted by ManojKumar View Post
    Who would you say is responsible for the ISIS? I mean financially?
    To be honest I wouldn't be surprised that the money is coming from CIA proxies. US has a powerful defence industry which emolys millions of Americans and therefor USA will need a new war in near future to secure these jobs.

    CIA worked thru ISI to create Mujahideen/Taleban. Now she might aswell be supporting ISIS to destablise the Middle East and bring down the Arab Monarchies by fellow Arabs. US loves others to do their dirty jobs.
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  20. #60
    Senior Member ManojKumar's Avatar
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    Re: ISIS capture Mosul, Tikrit; march towards Baghdad

    Quote Originally Posted by Neo View Post
    To be honest I wouldn't be surprised that the money is coming from CIA proxies. US has a powerful defence industry which emolys millions of Americans and therefor USA will need a new war in near future to secure these jobs.

    CIA worked thru ISI to create Mujahideen/Taleban. Now she might aswell be supporting ISIS to destablise the Middle East and bring down the Arab Monarchies by fellow Arabs. US loves others to do their dirty jobs.
    So now the US are considering going in to tame their own dragon? It doesn't make sense to fight the ones they have armed. My theory is based around Prince Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdulaziz.

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