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  1. #21
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Quote Originally Posted by Razamustafa76 View Post
    Walking dead is a series of zombies
    Zombie in Pakistan
    Usman Mukhtar experiments with new-age film-making



    LAHORE:
    Time and again, people are confronted with choices, but it seems Usman Mukhtar has made a firm decision. Despite being an actor, Mukhtar has followed the director’s path with two feature films already in the making. “I just want to focus on directing,” he remarks. But more than that, the talented director has been garnering quite a lot of attention for his short film, Waking Dead.

    Essentially a zombie-comedy, the film’s title song by Natasha Ejaz released this week. “I have known Natasha [for a long time] so I showed her the footage. I asked her if she wanted to try something different, maybe sing a rap song with some techno music in the background,” he says. Mukhtar envisioned the soundtrack to be fun and perky, and so the techno-track was born. The video, which shows two zombies freestyling to techno rap, appears similar to Tom Cruise’s dance sequence in Tropic Thunder.

    Even though the song was completely different from what she has done before, Ejaz, too, is positive about Mukhtar’s creativity. “If you have heard my music before, it’s a huge leap. I am not really a rapper and have not played techno, but when I looked at the story, it was comedic and I can relate to that,” says Ejaz, adding that the song is about a girl who falls in love with a zombie. “We already have a lot of hard-hitting films being made but then there is this, which is fun and sort of detached from reality,” she adds. She has collaborated with composer Shaheer Shahid for the song and it took them three months to complete it.



    Waking Dead has already been making waves for its peculiar genre. It has been submitted for international film festivals including the Dubai International Film Festival, Gulf Film Festival and Abu Dhabi Film Festival. But the idea for the movie came rather accidentally and with minimum planning.

    Mukhtar was holidaying in Dubai last year when he found out that make-up artist Nouf al Jhadhami was in town. He then wondered whether he could tap into Jhadhami’s talent to make a zombie film. “Normally, in Pakistan we don’t find talented prosthetic make-up artists. So I thought I would work on something and edit it when I go home. Even then, we were doing this for free and there was no budget,” asserts Mukhtar. Like his little-known, independent film Black Coffee, which he had made essentially for himself but later released online, this film was also not intended to be big by any means.

    However, as the work progressed the project began to grow. Within three-days, he had hours of footage and found a decent cast which starred UAE-based actors Nitin Mirani, Nadia Williams and Nidhi Jha. Working with limited shooting space, due to legal requirements, he utilised the basement garage of a PR agency and his sister’s apartment in Dubai. “When you are in Dubai, you need permission to shoot anywhere so it limited my options, but we worked through it,” says Mukhtar. He began work on the edit only two months ago. With a score by the talented Abbas Ali Khan, the dialogues are in both English and Urdu.

    Meanwhile, Mukhtar has also signed on to direct Anwar Maqsood’s script, Mein Tou Dekhun Ga, which he says is very different from his popular plays on August 14. “The story is about child beggars on the street so it will be completely different. Right now we are in the initial phase so we don’t have an idea of the location, where it will be shot,” says Mukhtar. “There is also another project, which is in the pre-production phase. We are hoping that will be done for 2016, and will have a big budget,” he adds.

    Published in The Express Tribune, November 15th, 2013.

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Upcoming Pakistani Movie 'NAACH' theatrical trailer....




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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Quote Originally Posted by Razamustafa76 View Post
    Upcoming Pakistani Movie 'NAACH' theatrical trailer....



    Looks like another big one here.
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Please remember to show our strong support Lollywood studios in buying DVD or cinema tickets, not free download or copies.
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Shan ki chandi nowadays!
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    'Waar' makes it way to global cinemas



    2013-11-14

    KARACHI: 'Waar' has achieved one massive milestone after the other and created history in Pakistan, reaching nearly $2 million box office collections to date from Pakistan market. ARY Films now takes ‘Waar’ global as anticipation for this movie reaches its peak around the world.

    Distributed by ARY Films, ‘Waar’ is written and produced by Dr. Hassan Waqas Rana while the young and talented Bilal Lashari has directed the movie. The star cast of ‘Waar’ includes a mix of industry veterans and newcomers: Superstar Shaan plays the lead role in the movie as he becomes the last hope for Pakistan’s security agencies to battle against the vicious opponent Shamoon Abbasi. Hamza Ali Abbasi, Aisha Khan, Ali Azmat, Misha Shafi, Kamran Lashari and Nadeem Abbas Rana make the rest of the cast of the movie.

    “After the gigantic success of Waar in Pakistan, we are now going to take it to the global stage. I believe that Waar has started a new era where we will be making world class movies and our talent will be appreciated around the world!” said Salman Iqbal, President and Founder, ARY Digital Network.

    “The cinema goers in Pakistan have given their verdict; they have made Waar the most successful movie in the history of the country. Now it’s time to show the world what we have made and what we are proud of. The countless queries from around the world which we are receiving about Waar tell us that it will do equally great in other markets as well”, said Mohammad Jerjees Seja, CEO, ARY Digital Network.

    “It is heartening to receive such overwhelming response from the Pakistani audience and now I look forward to a positive response from other international box offices as well” said Dr. Hassan Waqas Rana while sharing his thoughts on his movie going to global markets.


    “Waar is a movie made for the Pakistanis, by the Pakistanis and of the Pakistanis. It is great to see that people can see through that and are admiring the efforts put into this movie by the entire team. This is for the dawn of new Pakistani cinema! And it’s a dedication to all those brave men who sacrificed their lives to protect the sovereignty of Pakistan.”

    Pleased with the success of his debut movie, Bilal Lashari, Director of the movie ‘Waar’ said, “I’m grateful to each and every person that made the effort to go to the cinema and appreciate my movie. I’m hoping for the same level of appreciation from the international market. ‘Waar’ will always remain close to my heart and it is motivating to see the kind of response that my first movie is receiving. I thoroughly enjoyed the movie making experience and will continue to make movies on issues that I believe should be brought to the fore.”

    While showing his satisfaction with the movie the Pakistani superstar Shan Shahid said “After doing a movie like Waar, the biggest dream of my life has been fulfilled!” Shan pointed out that it was his dream that the best of the country collaborated to produce, direct, promote and distribute a movie to prove to the world that great films can be made in Pakistan as well. He appreciated the efforts made by ARY Films, the director, the producer and exhibitors to support Pakistani cinema.

    With the phenomenal response that ‘Waar’ continues to receive from the audience in Pakistan, there remains no doubt that it will receive tremendous response globally as well and it will continue to enthral the audiences with its magic wherever it goes.

    http://dawn.com/news/1056343/waar-ma...global-cinemas
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    The reluctant viewer

    2013-11-19



    I recently finally got around to watching Mira Nair’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist based on Mohsin Hamid’s novella of the same name. And after a long time I felt I should write something down, not as a review per se, but because of the various feelings I experienced watching it.

    Before I get into what I thought of the film, let me share a couple of revelations I had.

    The first came to me while I found myself scanning the visuals and listening to the Urdu dialogue for inauthenticities and – at one point – cringing at a famous Iqbal couplet recited wrongly. I suddenly realised how we, as a nation, often tend to look at non-Pakistani films about Pakistan and Pakistanis in a way we never look at other films. Mainly because we don't have the tools to judge them but also perhaps because we don't feel we need to. Is it a defence mechanism because most of these films paint a not-too-sympathetic portrait of 'our country'?



    Perhaps we look for these inauthenticities to validate a course of action that we have already decided in our heads, to better beat a work down by nitpicking its minor mistakes. Think of the controversy around Zero Dark Thirty and its alleged misuse of language or the quibbling about the Punjabi accent of actors in Khamosh Pani (I am using this as an example of a non-Pakistani film even though it is by a Pakistani director only because it was perceived as such). Attention to detail really does sometimes set a film on a higher pedestal, but, does it really matter to an audience, watching the film in, let's say, Brazil, whether the Urdu lettering on a sign is in Naskh instead of the Nastaleeq font, if an accent is correct or if a college depicted (as in this film) actually looks like a real college in Lahore? Do mistakes in art direction or language coaching change the impact of the story? I had to consciously try and stop myself from looking at the film as a defensive Pakistani and I am not sure I entirely succeeded. But it's a worthwhile exercise to try.

    The second epiphany I had was the realisation that it was easier to judge the film for itself, if I detached myself from the book that I had read. Admittedly, this is very difficult to do for most people; especially with books that have left a significant impact on them (this is why my theory is that it is far easier to adapt flawed books rather than near-perfect ones.) Maybe it was easier to do for me because I had forgotten most of the details of the original which I had read six or seven years ago and only remembered frameworks and emotions. (Full disclosure: I had actually approached Mohsin for film rights but they had already gone into auction by that time.) And this is what had drawn me to the book in the first place – the fact that its thinness of detail (it was basically a monologue) invited playing around, re-imagining portions and adding details to it. But I found that detaching myself from the book really helped me appreciate the film better, which is what a film should be critiqued as – as a creative work wholly in and of itself.

    So, how was it for me purely as a film?

    Despite some harsh criticisms that I had read and heard, I actually thought the film was not bad at all and actually very engaging until almost near the end. There was a convincing buildup of how the protagonist – a young Pakistani in the US – changes from an enthusiastic participant in globalised (read Western) capitalism to someone forced to become more aware of his own cultural moorings and his position as a Muslim in post-9/11 America. This intersection of economics with race, religion and culture is quite believably handled and very ably portrayed by actor, Riz Khan.



    The reluctant viewer
    HASAN ZAIDI

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    2013-11-19 19:22:06
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    I recently finally got around to watching Mira Nair’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist based on Mohsin Hamid’s novella of the same name. And after a long time I felt I should write something down, not as a review per se, but because of the various feelings I experienced watching it.

    Before I get into what I thought of the film, let me share a couple of revelations I had.

    The first came to me while I found myself scanning the visuals and listening to the Urdu dialogue for inauthenticities and – at one point – cringing at a famous Iqbal couplet recited wrongly. I suddenly realised how we, as a nation, often tend to look at non-Pakistani films about Pakistan and Pakistanis in a way we never look at other films. Mainly because we don't have the tools to judge them but also perhaps because we don't feel we need to. Is it a defence mechanism because most of these films paint a not-too-sympathetic portrait of 'our country'?


    Perhaps we look for these inauthenticities to validate a course of action that we have already decided in our heads, to better beat a work down by nitpicking its minor mistakes. Think of the controversy around Zero Dark Thirty and its alleged misuse of language or the quibbling about the Punjabi accent of actors in Khamosh Pani (I am using this as an example of a non-Pakistani film even though it is by a Pakistani director only because it was perceived as such). Attention to detail really does sometimes set a film on a higher pedestal, but, does it really matter to an audience, watching the film in, let's say, Brazil, whether the Urdu lettering on a sign is in Naskh instead of the Nastaleeq font, if an accent is correct or if a college depicted (as in this film) actually looks like a real college in Lahore? Do mistakes in art direction or language coaching change the impact of the story? I had to consciously try and stop myself from looking at the film as a defensive Pakistani and I am not sure I entirely succeeded. But it's a worthwhile exercise to try.

    The second epiphany I had was the realisation that it was easier to judge the film for itself, if I detached myself from the book that I had read. Admittedly, this is very difficult to do for most people; especially with books that have left a significant impact on them (this is why my theory is that it is far easier to adapt flawed books rather than near-perfect ones.) Maybe it was easier to do for me because I had forgotten most of the details of the original which I had read six or seven years ago and only remembered frameworks and emotions. (Full disclosure: I had actually approached Mohsin for film rights but they had already gone into auction by that time.) And this is what had drawn me to the book in the first place – the fact that its thinness of detail (it was basically a monologue) invited playing around, re-imagining portions and adding details to it. But I found that detaching myself from the book really helped me appreciate the film better, which is what a film should be critiqued as – as a creative work wholly in and of itself.

    So, how was it for me purely as a film?

    Despite some harsh criticisms that I had read and heard, I actually thought the film was not bad at all and actually very engaging until almost near the end. There was a convincing buildup of how the protagonist – a young Pakistani in the US – changes from an enthusiastic participant in globalised (read Western) capitalism to someone forced to become more aware of his own cultural moorings and his position as a Muslim in post-9/11 America. This intersection of economics with race, religion and culture is quite believably handled and very ably portrayed by actor, Riz Khan.


    I do remember reading scathing reviews of the film in the Western press (such as this one in the New York Times) but having now seen it, I think they were often glib or exaggerated. I didn't even find Kate Hudson as terrible as she had been made out to be by most Western critics, though, I can certainly see that a better casting would have added a sorely missing oomph to the character. In fact, my feeling after seeing the film is that some of the Western reviewers' attacks on her portrayal were actually about her character's flakiness, particularly an act of supreme insensitivity committed by her. And I couldn't help thinking that this was perhaps a Western defence mechanism about how ‘one of their own’ is portrayed.



    Also, much as I was initially dismayed when I had heard that the film had retained the book's framing device of the protagonist telling his story (all too common in many films, e.g. Life of Pi) right from the beginning, the film actually managed to pull it off for the most part – it didn't just bookend the rest of the story but actually had its own momentum. If I were to (for a moment) compare the film to the book, I would say the strongest element of the book for me – a sense of sinister ambiguity of the motives of the two characters, one telling the story, the other simply listening – is lost halfway into the film. But surprisingly, this did not dismantle the film for me because the film's screenplay had its own logic.

    Where the film actually falters is at the 1 hour 44 minute mark, almost 80 per cent into the film. Because from here on the screenplay simply loses its coherence. The critiques of the film’s narrative that I had read earlier actually hold true from here on out. Perhaps the need to develop a Hollywood-style thrilling climax causes it, but suddenly what made eminent sense earlier, suddenly stops making sense, and directorial heavy-handedness overtake what had until then been a fairly sophisticated style of storytelling. (Spoiler Alert! If you still haven’t seen the film and plan to do so, skip the following two sentences.) Basically the problem here is this: After building up a case for how American government operatives lacking in nuance may be totally mistaken in assuming that an anti-imperialist academic is a terrorist, the film shows the academic actually is very much involved in the kidnapping of an American by militants. And yet, we are supposed to be on his side when he decides to free his captive and to believe that he faces no American retribution.



    In that it is fitting but unfortunate that the film which for the most part kept taking the viewer out of comfortable predictability, ends on a clichéd, politically correct eulogy the protagonist mouths.

    End Note: The most powerful music in the film for me - obviously coloured by how it is used – had me scrambling at the end credits to check who the vocalist was. I kept wondering who this new woman was with such a unique, raw but powerful voice – it had shades of Abida Parveen but was too thin to be her and I was convinced it was someone new I had never heard before. Turned out, it was Atif Aslam.

    http://dawn.com/news/1057192/the-reluctant-viewer
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Quote Originally Posted by roomismart View Post
    when waar comes to torrents? I want to see plz reply soon.
    Dear we don't know ... iam also waiting for WAAR

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Upcoming New Pakistani Movie .. Freedom Sound

    Last edited by Razamustafa76; 8th December 2013 at 05:42.

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Waar 2 is officially in the making




    KARACHI:

    It seems like everything is heading in the right direction for Pakistani cinema, as the makers of Waar have already announced its sequel, Waar 2. Waar became the highest grossing film in Pakistan’s cinematic history when it surpassed the Rs200 million mark at the local box office in November, beating Chooriyan’s record-breaking take when it was released in 1998.

    Though the film is yet to be released internationally, with the UAE and the UK being the first likely release regions, the sequel has already been announced for an expected release in 2015.

    Waar revolves around the efforts of the Pakistani army and intelligence forces as they try to stop a terrorist attack from occurring within the country. The film stars actors Shaan and Hamza Abbasi.

    Representative of ARY films revealed that Waar 2 will not be directed by Bilal Lashari, but by the writer/producer of Waar, Dr Hassan Waqas Rana. The reason behind this directorial change has not been disclosed. Sources close to ARY Films reveal that given the massive success of Waar on Eidul Fitr 2013, the producers are aiming for an Eidul Fitr 2015 release for the sequel.

    Waar 2 will be a collaboration between Mindworks Media and ARY Films, and is all set to go into production in 2014. The movie will be shot in a number of international locations including Russia, Yugoslavia, UK and Turkey and will cast both local and international actors. However, this is not the only collaborative project between the two companies. Mindworks and ARY will also be collaborating on another movie, Delta Echo Foxtrot. Details of the two projects were shared at a press conference held at the ARY office in Saddar, Karachi on Saturday. Speaking on the occasion, Mr Salman Iqbal, President and founder of ARY Digital Network said, “After the super success of Waar and the sound relationship that we have developed with Mind works Media, it is natural for both companies to bring their expertise together for even bigger and better movies.”

    Top-notch directors from both Pakistan and Hollywood will work under the umbrella of this collaboration. Shooting for Delta Echo Foxtrot, the first venture under this collaboration will begin at the end of 2013, with the film slated for a 2014 release. The plot for Delta Echo Foxtrot will centre on the concepts of courage, sacrifice, passion and patriotism. While the cast of this movie is yet to be finalised, it will not only boast top names in the industry, but will also find new faces, auditions for which are currently being held. Further details of both the movies will be shared in the coming weeks.
    http://tribune.com.pk/story/642551/w...in-the-making/

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Upcoming New Pakistani Movie Kolachi

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Ucoming New Pakistani Movie - MAULA

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Quote Originally Posted by Razamustafa76 View Post
    Upcoming New Pakistani Movie Kolachi


    Looks like a good one.
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Zinda Bhaaag is such a great movie... <3

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Quote Originally Posted by sawaira.shahid365 View Post
    Zinda Bhaaag is such a great movie... <3
    where did you watch? online or in Cinema? i have only watched Mein hoon shahid Afridi, I will love to watch zinda bhaag and waar!

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Tamanna to release on Pakistan Day

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    LAHORE:

    At Vogue Towers on Friday evening there was a sense of relief and joy as it was announced that the film Tamanna will be released on March 23rd, by Summit Entertainment. The film, produced by Sarah Tareen and directed by Steven Moore, starring Salman Shahid, Omar Rana, Mehreen Raheel and Feryal Gauhar, has taken just about three years to complete. The film is set to mark the first major Pakistani film release of 2014, and will follow-up the release of Waar, Zinda Bhaag and Mein Hoon Shahid Afridi, last year.

    “My entire experience of making this film was exciting. They say all is well that ends well, but this is just the beginning, it has been a great experience making a film on my home ground, I have high hopes that this film will be successful,” said Mehreen Raheel.

    For Raheel, this is her follow-up to her debut film Virsa. The cast of the film comprises of a close-knit group of actors who have strong grounds in theatre and television. The charismatic Salman Shahid, who is fresh-off the release, remarked that he had done some theatre with Omair Rana and has worked with Mehreen Raheel’s mother Seemi Raheel.

    Regardless, the cast and production team of Tamanna was relatively new on many levels for old Lollywood film journalists from Lahore, who are now coming to terms with the new faces. One of them was so confused and flabbergasted by the development, he asked producer Sarah Tareen, “Why have you left our heritage and forgotten our old Lollywood personalities such as Noor.”

    Tamanna has been a work in progress for a long time. It is an initiative by two ambitious young filmmakers, Sarah Tareen and Steven Moore, who are attempting to make a film that would be different. Tareen explained that there were different commercial styles of filmmaking and her goal was to bring story-telling on the screen.

    “People have asked why it took three years. It’s very simple. Some countries have a studio system, over here that does not exist, so you have independent filmmaking. All these films that have been made are being done independently, people are raising their own funds and making films,” says Tareen.

    The film is about Rizwan Ahmed (Omair Rana) a struggling actor who meets Mian Tariq Ali played by Salman Shahid, a relic of the once thriving film industry. The struggling actor is there to convince Ali to divorce his wife, and in the process engages in an ordeal which leaves only one of the two men alive. The film incorporates elements of dark humour, melodrama, crime, passion and revenge and is based on Anthony Shaffer’s play, Sleuth. It is written for the screen by Steven Moore and Ijlal Khan.

    The film has already received considerable acclaim due to its soundtrack. The track, Koi Dil Mein, which has been sung by Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and composed by Sahir Ali Bagga, won the Best Music Talent in Film Award in the 14th London South Asian Film Festival 2012’s BAFTA ceremony. Come Pakistan Day, audiences will be able to determine if it deserves acclaim for the story and acting performances as well.
    http://tribune.com.pk/story/666969/t...-pakistan-day/

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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    ^^ whos the goirl? hot as hell
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Waar done about half a million business in UK until now....
    which is good as UK record for a single movie is 41 million for despicable me 2.
    A foreign movie and a Pakistani movie reaching a million in UK will be very good.
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    Re: Pakistan's New Movies | News

    Quote Originally Posted by safriz View Post
    ^^ whos the goirl? hot as hell
    Mehreen Raheel ... Like A Red Chlli

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