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Thread: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

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  1. #41
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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

    ^^^ Very difficult to interpret your post , no offence.. please lessen the typos
    And please don't compare conventional EMP weapons with Nuclear EMP weapons
    . I will reply in detail to whatever i can interpret from your post later

  2. #42
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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion



    INS Vikramaditya, India's biggest warship, finally arrives



    New Delhi: India's biggest ship, aircraft Carrier INS Vikramaditya, which was acquired from Russia in November, has finally arrived in the Indian Navy's Area of Operation in the Arabian Sea after a long voyage. (See pics)

    The much-awaited $2.3 billion ship is being escorted by other ships of India's western fleet and is headed to the Indian Navy's base at Karwar on the western coast. As the big ship entered the Indian Navy's area of operation in north western Arabian Sea, it had for the first time, the older and smaller aircraft carrier, INS Viraat, alongside it on Saturday. Throughout its long journey INS Vikramaditya has been accompanied by INS Trikand, a Talwar class frigate, INS Delhi, a Delhi class destroyer, and INS Deepak, the fleet tanker.

    Fleet commander of the Western Fleet, Rear Admiral Anil Chawla, led the flotilla of the Western Fleet, that also comprised INS Viraat, besides two Delhi class destroyers, three Trishul class stealth frigates, a Godavari class frigate and a couple of offshore vessels.

    INS Vikramaditya, which was commissioned into the Indian Navy on November 16 at the Sevmash shipyard in North Russia' Severodvinsk, is scheduled to reach its home port at Karwar in Karnatakain a week. The aircraft carrier is then expected to begin its weapons and air fleet integration. The air wing consists of 30 MiG 29K aircraft and six Kamov helicopters.

    The MiG 29Ks would provide a significant boost to Indian Navy with their range of over 700 nautical miles, extendable to over 1,900 nautical miles with mid-air refuelling, and an array of weapons like anti-ship missiles, beyond visual range air-to-air missiles and guided bombs and rockets.

    INS Vikramaditya is 284 metres long and 60 metres high - that's about as high as a 20-storeyed building. The ship weighs 40,000 tonnes and will be the biggest and heaviest ship to be operated by the Indian Navy.

    The warship can sail nearly 1300 kilometres a day and can operate for 45 days without replenishment. It will be manned by about 1600 people. Just the crew is expected to use over one lakh eggs, 200,000 litres of milk and over 16 tonnes of rice every month.

    INS Vikramaditya is a Kiev class aircraft carrier which was commissioned by Russian Navy in 1987 under the name Baku. It was later renamed as Admiral Gorshkov and last sailed in 1995 in Russia, before being offered to India. India agreed to buy it in 2004 for $974 million. The cost kept shooting up as Russia delayed the delivery by over five years.

    India is also building its first indigenous aircraft carrier, the INS Vikrant, in Kochi, which is expected to join the navy in 2018-19.
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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

    Very Interesting.......

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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion


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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion



    INS Vikramaditya enters Indian Navy's area of operation

    It was a sight to behold. As India’s newest aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya entered the Indian Navy’s area of operation in north western Arabian Sea, accompanied by three other vessels, it was rendezvoused — in Naval parlance RVed — with the Western Fleet that had gone all the way from Mumbai to receive it.

    INS Vikramaditya, which was accompanied by INS Trikand, which is a Talwar class frigate, INS Delhi which is a Delhi class destroyer and INS Deepak, the fleet tanker, fired ceremonial guns to salute the flag of the fleet commander Rear Admiral Anand Chawla, who was leading the flotilla of the Western Fleet, that also comprised aircraft carrier INS Viraat.

    The other ships besides INS Viraat which had gone to receive INS Vikramaditya included two Delhi class destroyers, three Trishul class stealth frigates, a Godavari class frigate and a couple of offshore vessels.

    All this happened about 1200 nautical miles from the country's shores on New Year’s eve and thereafter all the aircraft carriers, frigates and destroyers together set sail for India.

    INS Vikramaditya, which was commissioned into the Indian Navy on November 16 last at the North Russian shipyard of Sevmash at Severodvinsk, is now headed for its home port at Karwar in Karnataka where it is scheduled to reach in a week’s time.

    Commanded by Captain Suraj Berry, INS Vikramaditya -- which took eight years to refurbish at the Russian yard -- would reach Karwar on completing a near 8500 nautical mile journey.

    On reaching Karwar, the aircraft carrier would re-equip and prepare and get ready for the next phase which would be its integration with the air wing, comprising about 30 Mig 29K aircraft and six Kamov Ka-31 “Helix” reconnaissance and anti-submarine helicopters.

    It would take around four to six months for the full integration of the aircraft carrier after which it will become the spearhead of the carrier battle group. During this period, the aircraft carrier would also be equipped with surface-to-air missile (SAM) and close-in weapon system (CIWS) to safeguard it from aerial attack.

    At the time of commissioning of INS Vikramaditya Indian Navy Chief Admiral D.K. Joshi had indicated that Indian naval fighter pilots would be certified to carry out flying operations from the carrier deck within weeks of the carrier’s arrival in India.

    While a batch of combat fliers from ‘Black Panther’ squadron has undertaken simulator training in Moscow, before the flying operations from the carrier deck, they are also scheduled to perfect take-off and landing on the shore-based test facility (SBTF) at INS Hansa in Goa.
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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

    Self Delete....

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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

    Navy pilots to learn landing, taking off from aircraft carrier


    New Delhi: Indian Navy pilots will learn the tricks of landing and taking off their MiG-29K and LCA Tejas combat planes on aircraft carriers from a shore-based facility, which was commissioned in Goa today.

    The Shore-based Test Facility (SBTF)—which is the third facility of its kind in the world and first of its kind in Asia—was operationalised at the Naval Air Station, Hansa in Goa, a Goa Shipyard Limited release said.


    This unique installation replicates a shore-based facility of the indigenous aircraft carrier INS Vikrant, which is under construction at the Cochin Shipyard Limited," it said.

    Spearheaded by the Aeronautical Development Agency, the complete structural work and system integration of SBTF was carried out by Goa shipyard Limited.

    "This will provide India with a capability for the test development of an aircraft before they are cleared for use on board aircraft carriers. It will also provide the Navy with a facility to hone the skills of its pilots before they are deployed on board," the release said.

    Speaking on the occasion, GSL Chief Rear Admiral Vineet Bakhshi said, "Training of naval pilots on MiG 29K has already commenced. The facility will ensure timely induction of Naval LCA (NLCA) into naval service and conserve ship-based test flying effort."

    PTI

    http://www.firstpost.com/india/navy-...r-1369095.html

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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion


    The Podberezovik-EТ1 3D radar has a coverage of 500kms, can detect aircrafts more than 300kms and has a high radar efficiency and jamming-protection are provided.
    Fregat-М2EМ 3D Radar has a 300km coverage area and can detect fighter aircrafts upto 230kms!
    LORAN (LOng RAnge Navigation) is a radio navigation system which enables ships and aircraft to determine their position and speed from low frequency radio signals transmitted by fixed land based radio beacons, using a receiver unit.
    And Israeli EL/M 2258 Radar for Barak 2, long range surface-to-air missile (LR-SAM). EL/M 2258 is a 3D radar which tracks missiles >25kms and aircrafts >120kms. This will be installed late
    “Pursue one great decisive aim with force and determination.”
    - Carl von Clausewitz

  13. #53
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    Re: MiGs touch down on the Vikramaditya’s deck

    Quote Originally Posted by Agnostic_Indian View Post
    around 850km, just on internal fuel.
    I doubt the above. IIRC the bow ramp meant that Russian aircraft had to launch lightly loaded (A few SRAAMs) with a third of the fuel to get off the deck.

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    Re: MiGs touch down on the Vikramaditya’s deck

    Your Aircraft Carrier Is a Piece of Crap
    Case studies in faulty flattops


    by DAVID AXE

    Imposing, flexible, able to sail fast and launch devastating air strikes at long range, aircraft carriers are the ultimate expression of national power. And many of the world’s best-armed countries are acquiring them. China, Russia, India, Brazil, the U.K., France, America.

    But just getting your hands on a flattop is hardly enough. For every example of a country that succeeds in deploying a functional carrier and matching air wing, there’s a counter-example: a flattop hobbled by mechanical problems, stricken by age, sidelined by bad design or stuck with warplanes that simply don’t work.

    What follows are not the success stories. They are the case studies in flattop failure … and object lessons for all the countries building aircraft carriers today.

    Mother Russia’s tugboat bait

    The Admiral Kuznetsov, Russia’s only aircraft carrier, was launched in 1985 and joined the fleet in 1991. Since then the 55,000-ton, fossil-fuel-powered flattop has managed just four frontline deployments—all of them to the Mediterranean, and all of them just a few months in duration.

    By contrast, American flattops typically deploy for at least six months every two years. The nuclear-powered USS Enterprise, commissioned in 1962, completed 25 deployments before leaving service in 2012.

    One of Admiral Kuznetsov’s major problems is her powerplant. The vessel is powered by steam turbines and turbo-pressurized boilers that Defense Industry Daily generously described as “defective.” Anticipating breakdowns, large ocean-going tugs accompany Admiral Kuznetsov whenever she deploys.

    Poor maintenance makes life difficult and dangerous for Admiral Kuznetsov’s 1,900 sailors. A short circuit started a fire off Turkey in 2009 that killed one seaman.

    Her pipes are bad. “When it’s this cold, water freezes everywhere including pipes which may cause a rupture,” English Russia reported. “To prevent this, they just don’t supply almost 60 percent of the cabins with water (neither in winter nor in summer). The situation with latrines is just as bad. The ship has over 50 latrines but half of them are closed.”

    Almost 2,000 men. Twenty-five latrines. Do the math. Training and morale are so poor that in 2009 Admiral Kuznetsov sailors apparently botched an at-sea refueling, spilling hundreds of tons of fuel into the Irish Sea, pictured at left.

    And even when the ship functions as intended, her design limits her utility. Admiral Kuzentsov does not have steam catapults like American flatttops do. Instead, her Sukhoi fighters launch into the air off a bow ramp. The fighters must stay light, meaning they can carry only a few air-to-air missiles and a partial fuel load. Their patrol endurance is measured in minutes rather than hours.

    English Russia summed up the Russian aircraft carrier’s fundamental limitations succinctly. “Actual aircrafts visit this ship pretty rarely.”

    Moscow appreciates its flattop problem and has vague plans to replace Admiral Kuznetsov sometime in the 2020s, by which time planners can realistically expect to have deployed the decrepit old lady maybe two or three more times.

    But the Russians promised us she would work

    Admiral Kuznetsov’s ill repute did not deter the Indian and Chinese governments from acquiring second-hand Russian carriers. China’s Liaoning, a rebuilt sister ship of Admiral Kuznetsov, began limited testing in the summer of 2012, serving a mostly educational role while a Chinese shipyard slowly built a new carrier from scratch.

    Outfitted with the same faulty powerplant and performance-limiting bow ramp, Liaoning is unlikely to venture far from shore or send her lightly-loaded J-15 fighters—copies of Russian Sukhois—into serious combat. In a rare pique, Chinese state media denounced the J-15s as “flopping fish.”

    India’s experience has been even worse. In 2004 New Delhi inked a $1.5-billion deal for the 1982-vintage Russian flattop Admiral Gorshkov. In Russian service, the 45,000-ton vessel had carried a few helicopters and small Yakovlev jump jets; the Indians paid to have the flight deck expanded and a bow ramp fitted to accommodate up to 16 MiG-29 fighters.

    Renamed Vikramaditya, the flattop was due to enter service in 2008. But the poorly-managed Russian shipyard was overwhelmed by the scale of the refit. The cost doubled and trials were bumped back to September 2012. And when the crew pushed the conventionally-powered ship to her theoretical top speed of 32 knots, her boilers overheated.

    “India didn’t want to use asbestos as heat protection for the boilers,” Defense Industry Daily explained. “Instead, the boilers’ designer had to use firebrick ceramics. Which, as we see, didn’t work so well. Especially on a ship that Russia put up for sale in 1994, after a boiler room explosion.” Our emphasis.

    More repairs. More delays. More money. “The problems revealed during sea trials last year have been fixed,” Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin vowed in late 2013, by which point Vikramaditya was expected to enter active service in India in the spring of 2014.

    “Active service” being a relative term. If Russia’s own experience with its crappy carriers is any indication, the Indian ship will spend most of her time in port being repaired between brief forays into near waters. New Delhi is building a new carrier from scratch that should eventually complement the Russian hand-me-down.

    The floating museum

    Not all shitty aircraft carriers are Russian. The U.K. and France have both sold to poorer navies decommissioned flattops that probably should have been permanently retired. In 2000 the Brazilian navy acquired the former Foch from Paris for $12 million.

    Commissioned into French service in 1963, the 33,000-ton, non-nuclear Foch carried 40 fighters and helicopters. Unlike Russian flattops, Foch had a steam catapult, allowing her to boost heavily-laden planes off her deck.

    The Brazilians renamed her Sao Paulo and, for the first four years, busily sailed the second-hand vessel in a series of regional exercises—practicing with her upgraded A-4 fighters, sailing with the American carrier USS Ronald Reagan and even qualifying Argentinian planes for deck operations. Sao Paulo was, and remains, Latin America’s only aircraft carrier.

    But her age began to show, despite Brazil spending an additional $100 million on upkeep. On-board fires in 2005 and 2012 killed two sailors and left the flattop “barely functioning beyond flag-flying and light duties,” according to Warships International Fleet Review. “The Brazilian defense ministry admitted the ship’s effectiveness is extremely limited.” Today the A-4s rarely fly.

    Sao Paulo’s replacement is still in the planning stages: a brand-new carrier to enter service some time in the 2020s, around the same time that Russia, China and India all hope to have new and better—that is to say, safe and functional—flattops of their own.

    https://medium.com/war-is-boring/you...p-f3f52d299588

  15. #55
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    Re: MiGs touch down on the Vikramaditya’s deck

    Please note the Vikramaditya is SMALLER than both the Russian and Chinese carriers which means that the numbers bandied about of aircraft will be reduced as if you see pictures of the hanger space it is VERY cramped.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  16. #56
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    Re: INS Vikramaditya News and Discussion

    Quote Originally Posted by contract killer View Post
    Very Interesting.......

    Quote Originally Posted by contract killer View Post
    Please note how the aircraft numbers differ grealy in the above....

  17. #57
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    Re: MiGs touch down on the Vikramaditya’s deck

    Quote Originally Posted by keysersoze View Post
    Please note the Vikramaditya is SMALLER than both the Russian and Chinese carriers which means that the numbers bandied about of aircraft will be reduced as if you see pictures of the hanger space it is VERY cramped.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Cramped environment = more chance of error and as if India don't have history with this?

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