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  1. #41
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Turkey aims to increase ballistic missile ranges (Old article from 2012)


    ANKARA - Hürriyet Daily News
    Missiles with a range of 2,500 kilometers are a realistic target according to Professor Yücel Altınbaşak, head of Turkey’s State Scientific Research Institute. However, analysts remain uncertain as to Turkey’s capacity or need to achieve this goal

    Turkey aims to build ballistic missiles with a range of 2,500 kilometers within the next two years, Turkish officials have said, but analysts remain uncertain as to whether the country needs, or can even achieve, such a capability.

    Professor Yücel Altınbaşak, head of Turkey’s State Scientific Research Institute (TÜBİTAK), recently told reporters that the decision to build the ballistic missiles was made at a recent meeting of the High Board of Technology and in line with a request from Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

    Altınbaşak said TÜBİTAK had already produced and delivered a missile with a range of 500 kilometers to the Turkish military and added that the missile had displayed a mere five-meter deviation from its target in field tests. In the next phase of the program this year, TÜBİTAK will first test the 1,500-kilometer missile before heading for the final goal of 2,500 kilometers.

    Altınbaşak said building missiles with a range of 2,500-kilometer was a “realistic target for Turkey.” But analysts voiced doubts about Turkey’s ballistic ambitions.

    “TÜBİTAK already has the technology to build the 185-kilometer stand-off-munitions (SOM) missiles. It may have reached the 500-kilometer range recently by diminishing the payload or by some other modifications. It is still dubious, however, how the tests for 500 kilometers went unnoticed globally,” a missile technology expert said.

    A Middle East political expert said Turkey’s decision to produce cruise and ballistic missiles may mark a change in threat and security design perceptions.

    “Why would the Turks need these missiles? Where will they use them? Against which threats? It is also intriguing that Turkey, which seeks a modern air force with deterrent firepower, is going along the path many rogue states with no modern air force capabilities have gone,” the specialist said.

    Since 1997, Turkey has been a member of the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) which was established in 1987 by Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Britain, and the United States.

    The MTCR was created in order to curb the spread of unmanned delivery systems for nuclear weapons, specifically delivery systems that could carry a minimum payload of 500 kilograms a minimum of 300 kilometers.

    Experts agree that the MTCR has been successful in helping to slow or stop several ballistic missile programs; Argentina, Egypt and Iraq abandoned their joint Condor II ballistic missile program, while Brazil, South Africa, South Korea and Taiwan also shelved or eliminated missile or space launch vehicle programs.

    Some Eastern European countries, such as Poland and the Czech Republic, destroyed their own ballistic missiles to – in part – better their chances of joining MTCR.

    But there is consensus that the MTCR regime has its limitations. India, Iran, North Korea, and Pakistan (all non-members) continue to advance their missile programs. All four countries, with varying degrees of foreign assistance, have deployed medium-range ballistic missiles that can travel more than 1,000 kilometers and are exploring missiles with much greater ranges. Similarly, Iran has supplied missile production items to Syria.

    The missile expert said Turkey’s announcement for ballistic missile production may ring alarm bells in some of the countries which produce “the ingredients” for these missiles.

    “From now on Turkey may find it increasingly difficult to have access to some of the components it will need to achieve its missile ambitions,” the expert said. “Some countries may think it more appropriate to introduce limitations to the Turkish purchase of some technology.”

    February/01/2012

    http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/tur...&NewsCatID=345
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  2. #42
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Turkish Bird Spy Cleared Of Suspicion, Released

    ISTANBUL (AP) — A bird of prey found in a Turkish village has been cleared of local suspicion it was aiding Israeli spies.

    Found Kestrel Suspected Of Being Israeli Spy

    The private Dogan news agency reported Friday that villagers in a rural town in central Turkey found the kestrel this week and delivered it to local authorities after discovering a leg band marked “24311 Tel Avivunia Israel.” Such bands are often used to track bird migrations.

    Turkish Bird Spy Not Talking, Subjected To X-Ray

    Authorities confirmed in a statement that they released the bird into the wild Thursday after x-rays performed at a veterinary hospital found that “there was no other device” attached to the bird aside from the leg band.

    Dogan, which published a copy of the x-ray record, says medical staff labeled it “Israeli Spy.” It was not immediately clear whether the label was tongue-in-cheek.

    Migration patterns of kestrels are often studied, as many species of raptors are becoming increasingly endangered. One study indicates, “Populations [of the Lesser Kestrel] have declined during past decades, the main cause suggested as being habitat loss at both their breeding and their wintering grounds as a consequence of agricultural intensi?cation, urbanization and intensive pasture management.”
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  3. #43
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by Mirza44 View Post
    Turkish Bird Spy Cleared Of Suspicion, Released

    ISTANBUL (AP) — A bird of prey found in a Turkish village has been cleared of local suspicion it was aiding Israeli spies.

    Found Kestrel Suspected Of Being Israeli Spy

    The private Dogan news agency reported Friday that villagers in a rural town in central Turkey found the kestrel this week and delivered it to local authorities after discovering a leg band marked “24311 Tel Avivunia Israel.” Such bands are often used to track bird migrations.

    Turkish Bird Spy Not Talking, Subjected To X-Ray

    Authorities confirmed in a statement that they released the bird into the wild Thursday after x-rays performed at a veterinary hospital found that “there was no other device” attached to the bird aside from the leg band.

    Dogan, which published a copy of the x-ray record, says medical staff labeled it “Israeli Spy.” It was not immediately clear whether the label was tongue-in-cheek.

    Migration patterns of kestrels are often studied, as many species of raptors are becoming increasingly endangered. One study indicates, “Populations [of the Lesser Kestrel] have declined during past decades, the main cause suggested as being habitat loss at both their breeding and their wintering grounds as a consequence of agricultural intensi?cation, urbanization and intensive pasture management.”
    Looks like everythings possible
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  4. #44
    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    First, i was a little bit shocked with the article. Than i understand, the author of the article have not much of a insight about defence industry.

    For example, in the production of the Göktürk 2 satellite, Turkish decision makers claimed that it was 80 percent locally manufactured. The public was thus being deceived since considerable technical support was received from foreign suppliers in the production of this satellite which was put into orbit lately from China.
    I can't see how the public is being deceived. %80 percent produced locally with the ToT. What's wrong about acquiring ToT, should we have to re-invent an existing Technology ? And not having a SLV has nothing to do with producing a satellite.

    As for the T-Loramids, our latest news was.

    Ankara leans toward selecting Chinese long-range anti-missile and air defense systems while NATO allies look shocked by the possibility of the decision


    Turkey’s western allies look puzzled by a looming decision by Ankara to select Chinese long-range anti-missile and air defense systems which they think cannot be integrated into the NATO-sponsored early warning architecture currently deployed on Turkish soil.

    “That would certainly leave many of us speechless,” said one senior diplomat from a NATO country. “Turkey has every right to choose its own air defense system but we do not quite understand the logic of opting for a Chinese system with no interoperability with the existing [NATO] assets.”

    A NATO ally defense attaché in Ankara said that deploying a Chinese air defense system to protect Turkish airspace could have political repercussions. “Questioning Turkey’s geopolitical trajectory would then be legitimate,” he said.

    Turkey’s defense procurement officials are about to wrap up their assessment on four rival solutions in a multibillion dollar program to build advanced long-range anti-missile and air defense systems, strongly leaning toward the Chinese bid. One defense official said that the government had come to the conclusion that the Chinese proposal was technologically satisfactory, allowed sufficient levels of technology transfer and was much cheaper than rival solutions. He said that the decision to select the Chinese contender was awaiting final approvals from Defense Minister Ismet Yilmaz and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.

    Turkey in January restructured the $4 billion program, dubbed T-LORAMIDS, which had originally been constructed as an off-the-shelf purchase.

    The contenders’ off-the-shelf bids would remain valid, but the country’s procurement office, the Undersecretariat for Defense Industries (SSM), would ask bidders to submit parallel, co-production solutions. Erdoğan had given orders for the launch of feasibility studies on the “potential co-production” of the system.

    The same month, SSM wrote to the bidders and asked them to send letters of intent for any co-production deal. The bidders are a U.S. partnership of Raytheon and Lockheed Martin, offering the Patriot air defense system; Russia’s Rosoboronexport, marketing the S-300; China’s CPMIEC (China Precision Machinery Export-Import Corp.), offering its HQ-9; and the Italian-French consortium Eurosam, maker of the SAMP/T Aster 30. T-LORAMIDS, has been designed to counter both enemy aircraft and missiles. Turkey presently has no long-range air-defense systems.

    Integration problem worries

    Western diplomats warn that Turkey may be deprived of the capability to integrate the Chinese-Turkish system into Turkey’s mostly NATO-owned early warning assets.

    “I cannot comment on how the [U.S.] administration would react to that. But I can tell you that integrating a Chinese or Chinese-Turkish air defense system into NATO assets may not be a good idea,” a U.S. diplomat said.

    Defense sources admit that U.S. officials had warned the “procurement bureaucracy” several times about the potential difficulties in achieving interoperability if Turkey decided to go for a Chinese or a Russian architecture.

    “I see that the Turks remain defiant. But I do not think it would be practically possible to integrate neither the air defense nor the anti-missile components of the planned Turkish-Chinese architecture into NATO radars,” a London-based Turkey specialist said. “The Turks would have the same problem if they chose the Russian system, but I think for the Americans China represents a more direct threat.”

    About half of Turkey’s network-based air defense picture (radars) have been paid for by NATO, according to a defense official. They are part of the NATO Air Defense Ground Environment. “Turkey can always decide to build a standalone system. But in that case, abstracting the air defense system from NATO assets would mean that Turkey will lose half of its radar capabilities,” said one defense analyst.

    He said Turkey would need interface data to make its own air defense architecture interoperable with NATO assets, primarily data on the Identify Friend and Foe system. “This is top secret and cannot be installed into any Chinese system,” the analyst said.

    Another major question, he said, is “how would Turkey have in its possession a made-in-China IFF system, and how would that system be integrated into its fleet of F-16 aircraft?”

    “There is an important degree of incompatibility here and all in all any Chinese-Turkish co-production program would look problematic,” he said.
    http://www.hurriyetdailynews.com/ank...&NewsCatID=483
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  5. #45
    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by Felix View Post
    Looks like everythings possible
    Mate, i have heard this news about earlier at it made my day.

    Villagers finds a bird. At the feet of the bird there is a ring where writes Israel/Tel aviv.



    So some villagers spread rumor and here we go.



    At the above left you can see Israel Ajan meaning Israel Agent.
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  6. #46
    Senior Member Red Dragon's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Turkey warns Syrian Kurds against 'dangerous' moves

    (Reuters) - Turkey urged Syrian Kurds on Friday not to establish a break-away entity in northern Syria by force, with Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan warning against any "wrong and dangerous" moves that could hurt Turkish security.

    The warning was issued at a meeting in Istanbul between Turkish intelligence officials and Saleh Muslim, head of the Democratic Union Party (PYD), whose militias have been fighting for greater autonomy for Kurdish parts of northern Syria.

    Muslim said last week that Kurdish groups aimed to set up an independent council to run Kurdish regions in Syria until the civil war ended. That would alarm Ankara, which is wary of deepening sectarian violence on its border.

    Turkey is trying to hold together a delicate peace process with Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK) militants on its own soil and is worried that moves towards Kurdish autonomy in Syria could embolden them and jeopardize that process.

    "Necessary warnings will be made to them that these steps they're taking are wrong and dangerous," Erdogan told reporters, as members of his National Intelligence Agency met Muslim.

    Separately, a Turkish farmer was killed and his two sons were wounded on Friday when a mortar shell from fighting between Kurds and Islamist rebels in Syria hit their field near the border, officials at the local state hospital told Reuters.

    The incident in the Turkish border town of Ceylanpinar underscores fears that Syria's civil war, now in its third year, is dragging in neighboring states.

    Last week Turkish troops returned fire and shot at PYD fighters after stray bullets from Syria killed a man and a 15-year-old boy in Ceylanpinar.

    SEEKING ASSURANCES

    Turkey wants to extract assurances from the PYD that it will not threaten Turkey's security or seek an autonomous region in Syria through violence, and that it will maintain a stance of firm opposition to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

    "We have three main expectations from Kurds in Syria. Firstly not to cooperate with the regime. When that happens, tensions between the Kurds and Arabs rise," Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu told the Radikal newspaper.

    "Two is not to establish a de-facto entity ... based on ethnic and sectarian lines without consulting with other groups," he was quoted as saying. "If such an entity is established, then all the groups would attempt to do the same thing and a war would be unavoidable."

    His third expectation was that Kurds did not engage in activities that would "endanger Turkey's border security".

    Muslim's meeting with the Turkish intelligence agency comes after a surge in violence on the Syrian side of the border.

    The PYD captured the Syrian border town of Ras al-Ain last week after days of clashes with Islamist rebel fighters from the al-Qaeda linked Nusra Front.

    ROAD MAP

    Erdogan, who called a meeting of his military and intelligence chiefs as well as senior cabinet ministers on Wednesday to discuss the unrest, said they would come up with a plan soon to contain the violence.

    "Our chief of staff, national intelligence agency and foreign ministry are working on this ... We will get together again and by discussing the developments over (the border) we will identify our steps and prepare a road map," he said.

    Clashes between the PYD and rebels fighting Assad have flared since Kurds began asserting control over parts of northeast Syria from late last year. Turkish foreign ministry officials have met with the PYD twice over the past two months and have held "positive" discussions, a government source said.

    The anti-Assad revolt has evolved from its origins as a peaceful protest movement in March 2011 into a civil war that has killed over 100,000 people and turned markedly sectarian.

    Turkey has emerged as one of the strongest backers of the Syrian rebels, giving them shelter on its soil, but denies arming them. Along with its allies, Ankara has, however, tried to distance itself from hardline Islamist groups like Nusra.

    "I view (their) behavior as a betrayal to the Syrian revolution," Davutoglu said, citing footage of killings and kidnappings carried out by radical groups.

    "But we have always supported the legitimate Syrian opposition and we continue this support."

    Syria's ethnic Kurdish minority has been alternately battling Assad's forces and the Islamist-dominated rebels. Kurds argue they support the revolt but rebels accuse them of making deals with the government in order to ensure their security and autonomy during the conflict.

    Turkey meanwhile has been making gradual but fragile progress in its efforts to end a three-decade insurgency by the PKK in its southeast, a conflict which has killed some 40,000 people.

    The PKK called a ceasefire this year but there has been a recent increase in militant activity and Kurdish politicians have voiced concern that the government has not been enacting promised reforms quickly enough.
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  7. #47
    Senior Member Hope's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Erdogan’s Assad Problem

    On Wednesday [July 24] Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan led a critical meeting of Necdet Ozel, chief of the General Staff; Besir Atalay, deputy prime minister; Sadullah Ergin, minister of justice; Ahmet Davutoglu, minister of foreign affairs; Muammer Guler, minister of interior; Ismet Yilmaz, minister of defense; Efkan Ala, counselor at the prime ministry; and Hakan Fidan, head of Turkey's National Intelligence Organization (MIT) to discuss the latest developments regarding the Kurdish movements at the Turkey-Syria border. Turkish media speculated that they also discussed enforcing a no-fly zone at that segment of the 951-km [591-mile] border line with Syria where Kurds are in the majority.

    Since last week, as it became clear that the Kurdish Democratic Union Party (PYD) has taken full control of tracts of land adjacent to the Turkish border, Ankara started to warn Kurds against any de facto declaration of autonomy but refrained from tying it to the solution process with the Kurds in Turkey. “We won’t allow the developments outside our borders to impact the resolution process negatively,” Davutoglu said. “Turkey has to take certain measures for the security of its borders, but these measures are not directed against any particular group.”

    If that is the case, however, there is also no need to even speculate about establishing a no-fly zone across the border in Syria, or talk about any concern regarding the Kurdish advances along the borders. Turkey has been proposing to establish a no-fly zone almost from the beginning of the Syrian civil war more than two years ago, but it has also made it clear that it won’t take a unilateral military action toward Syria. In fact, such a move would be a detrimental element for Turkish stability in all aspects — including its economy.

    More importantly, there is no sign that the international community is preparing to engage in any overt military action inside Syria. “I don’t believe that the United States will take any military action against the Syrian regime until it becomes clear how it will be possible to talk about some sort of stability in Egypt again,” Umit Ozdag, chairman of the 21st Century Turkey Institute, an Ankara-based think tank, said, arguing that the military coup in Egypt has extended the lifetime of the Bashar al-Assad regime.

    In that perspective, Al-Monitor Editor and CEO Andrew Parasiliti’s exclusive interview with the Republican chairman of the House Armed Services Committee completes this perception in Ankara that there won’t be a US-led military action into Syria to end the Bashar al-Assad regime any time soon:

    "[Howard P. 'Buck'] McKeon, who represents California’s 25th district, was cautious about a deeper US military engagement in Syria, in contrast to his counterpart, Carl Levin, the Democratic chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, who has proposed a US no-fly zone and consideration of limited US military strikes on Syrian targets,” Parasiliti wrote July 24. “If the president came to the House asking for authority to go in Syria, I don’t think he could get the vote on either side of the aisle,” McKeon said. “These people understand America, and right now they don’t want another war. We’ve been fighting the longest war in our history [in Afghanistan]. I think people would like the time to take a breath, so they’re not looking for another one. If they were, say Americans were instead of 70% against going in [Syria], they were 70% for it, then there might be some reason to bring it up in the House.”

    Further completing this thought, Ryan Crocker, a veteran US diplomat and a former ambassador to Syria (1998-2001), also suggested that it may be time to accept and get ready to see Assad prevailing this conflict. “There is little the United States can do to positively influence events in Syria,” Crocker wrote on July 24. “Our focus must be on preventing further spillover beyond its borders. There may come a point where exhaustion on both sides makes a political solution possible. We’re nowhere near that point. And my fear is that at the end of the day, the Assad regime prevails. We must be ready for that too.”

    The concern over the spillover of the Syrian civil war has been there since the beginning and it remains as a real challenge. However, Turkey seems to have trapped itself in a difficult corner to exit because it has been covertly extending support to radical and extremist groups trying to end the Assad regime. So far though, the efforts of Ankara and all the others have proven unsuccessful. “Russia, Iran and Hezbollah have stood firm behind their ally [in the Syrian regime], whereas the United States and others have kept debating whether to provide lethal or nonlethal weapons to the opposition,” Ozdag told Al-Monitor.

    And the question of what is next for Turkey in coping with the challenges it perceives as coming from the Kurds in Syria remains. Davutoglu argues that Turkey won’t accept any de facto declaration of Kurdish autonomy in Syria until a new Syrian parliament is established once again and Assad era comes to an end. As an academician, he may certainly argue the point. As a practitioner, however, he may consider that these things do happen (calling for autonomy, etc.) when there is chaos on the ground.

    What is more interesting is that Erdogan has taken pride for the past decade in reforming and therefore balancing the country’s foreign policy approach between the East and the West. His Justice and Development Party (AKP) government has been overtly critical of past Turkish administrations for turning their backs on the region and pursuing low-profile relationships with the Arab countries while favoring ties with Israel. In the end, one needs to question what Turkey has gained with all this policy shifting and new orientation of the Turkish foreign policy.

    The Turkish prime minister had adopted Assad as his brother and built an exceptionally close relationship — until August 2011, when Erdogan declared a policy to topple the Syrian regime. But Assad still remains in power and Ambassador Crocker warns that the world may have get ready to accept Assad prevailing in this conflict.

    As I stated on July 17in Turkey’s Erdogan Problem, the prime minister decided not to run for parliamentary elections again, and he has played all his cards to be the country’s first elected president in August 2014 and hopefully under a newly adopted presidential system, it looks difficult for him for now to achieve at least the latter part.

    In that case, could it be possible that Assad also lasts longer than Erdogan in power? Could it be possible that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad will prevail this conflict and Erdogan’s term as prime minister end before seeing his departure from power? That would be something for the Erdogan-Davutoglu team, who have been so arrogant in their approach to the Middle East, and insulted previous Turkish governments for not knowing anything about the region.

    The jury is, however, certainly out on the final chapter in this episode. I’m just stating the possibility and the challenges ahead, where it looks quite difficult to trust that the Ankara government knows what it is doing before taking its step forward on anything concerning the region.

    http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/orig...der-kurds.html
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  8. #48
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Turkish PM Erdogan threatens to sue Times over open letter

    Turkey's prime minister has threatened legal action against a UK newspaper for publishing an open letter criticising his handling of recent protests.

    Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused the Times of "renting out its pages for money".

    Hollywood celebrities and academics were among those who signed the letter this week accusing Turkey's government of "dictatorial rule".

    A row over a park in Istanbul last month triggered widespread anti-government protests.

    At least four people were killed and thousands more injured as police cracked down on demonstrators who accused Mr Erdogan of becoming increasingly authoritarian.

    "The press wants to throw mud to see if it sticks," Mr Erdogan told reporters in comments broadcast on Turkey's NTV channel.

    "The Times is renting out its own pages for money. This is the Times' failing. We will pursue legal channels regarding the Times."

    Mr Erdogan said those who signed the letter - taken out as an full-page advertisement - had "rented out their thoughts" and did not genuinely support democracy.

    "If they truly believed in democracy, they couldn't have displayed such a lack of character to call the leader of a party that won 50% of the vote a dictator," the prime minister said.

    The Times has so far not commented on the remarks.

    The open letter was signed by 30 people including Turkish pianist Fazil Say, US film stars Sean Penn and Susan Sarandon, film director David Lynch and British historian David Starkey.

    They condemned the crackdown on anti-government protesters and compared giant pro-government rallies - organised by Mr Erdogan's AKP party to counter the protests - to the huge rallies staged in Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany.

    The wave of unrest in Turkey was sparked by demonstrations against controversial plans to redevelop Istanbul's Gezi Park.

    The authorities' heavy-handed response sparked anti-government protests nationwide.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23474404
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  9. #49
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    ISTANBUL (Reuters) - Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan, an outspoken supporter of Egypt's ousted President Mohamed Mursi, lashed out at the European Union and others for failing to condemn strongly enough the killing of dozens in Cairo earlier on Saturday.

    Security forces shot dead dozens of Mursi supporters on Saturday, days after the army called for a popular mandate to wipe out "violence and terrorism" following its removal of Egypt's first democratically government on July 3.

    The EU's foreign policy chief, Catherine Ashton, said she "deeply deplores" the deaths and called for a halt in violence.

    But Erdogan, who has recently faced large street protests calling for his own government to quit, accused the EU of double standards for questioning the use of police teargas in Turkey but not the shooting deaths of protesters in Cairo.

    "Those who were silent when Egypt's national will was massacred are silent again when people are massacred. What happened to the EU (and) European values, where are those who go around giving lessons in democracy?" Erdogan said in a speech to a group of businessmen in Istanbul in televised comments.

    "Where is the United Nations? Where are those who created a brouhaha when Turkish police, in a completely justified and legitimate way, used water (cannon) and pepper spray now when there is a coup and a massacre in Egypt," he said.

    Erdogan's comments were made before U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, treading a fine line with an Arab ally that receives over $1 billion a year in U.S. military aid, urged Egyptian authorities to respect the right to peaceful protest.

    The EU, which Turkey seeks to join, and the United States both criticized the police crackdown on Turkey's fiercest anti-government protests in decades. Five people died in clashes.

    Erdogan's rule has been marked by his efforts to garner Turkey diplomatic clout in the Middle East.

    (Reporting by Ayla Jean Yackley; Editing by Sonya Hepinstall)

  10. #50
    Facebook Editor safriz's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    its funny how much the world Hates practicing mulims and Islam supporters....
    When Turkish seculars were only restrained by water cannons ..which isn't lethal ....the whole world was crying foul...and facebook..Twitter were spammed with supporting messages....

    now real Muslims are being shot to kill and nobody bothers...
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  11. #51
    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by safriz View Post
    its funny how much the world Hates practicing mulims and Islam supporters....
    When Turkish seculars were only restrained by water cannons ..which isn't lethal ....the whole world was crying foul...and facebook..Twitter were spammed with supporting messages....

    now real Muslims are being shot to kill and nobody bothers...
    Both agreed and disagreed with your comment.

    I wouldn't label "Gezi Park" protestors as "Secular". Infact using the the term "Secular" is wrong.

    Seculars opposite should be the ones who support Sheria. And you simply can't find anyone who will support sharia. (Maybe there is a very small minority who will support sheria but that would be %0.1 ).

    Another point is west's hypocrisy against Turkey is well know. Here let me give you an example.

    Turkey's Sat-Launcher Plans Raise Concerns



    ANKARA — Turkey has approved construction of its first satellite launching center to cater for the country’s mushrooming satellite programs.

    But Ankara’s western allies worry that the Turks intend to use their own launching pad to fire the long-range missiles they hope to build in the medium- to long-run.

    Turkey’s procurement agency, the Undersecretariat for Defense Industries (SSM), in early July signed a contract with the country’s national missile manufacturer, Roketsan, to build the Turkish Satellite Launching System (UFS) for pre-conceptual design work.

    Under the contract, Roketsan will design the UFS to be capable of launching, initially, satellites into low earth orbit (500 to 700 kilometers) through a launching center the company will build and the Turkish Air Force will operate.

    “We intend to end Turkey’s foreign dependency on launching military and [civilian] communications satellites,” one Roketsan official said. “We also think Turkey may launch other nations’ satellites with its own system in the longer-run.”

    An SSM official familiar with the program said one reason for the UFS project was that Turkish planners are aiming toward a compact space program, including a national launcher. “The government and military planners think that any space road map without an indigenous launcher would be incomplete,” he said.

    But diplomats and analysts think that the Turks may have other reasons for their desire to have their own satellite launcher.

    “Some of Turkey's NATO allies fear that Ankara could in the future use its satellite launcher also as a launching pad for its intended 2,500-kilometer-range missiles,” said one western ambassador in Ankara.

    A defense attaché from a Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) embassy in Ankara said: “It is puzzling for us to observe whether Turkey intends to use the planned [satellite] launcher for its missile ambitions. I think Turkey, if it intends to develop a long-range missile, would face other difficulties, such as problematic access to necessary equipment, other than a need to have its own launcher.”

    The SCO member states are China, Russia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Turkey in 2012 won the dialogue partner status at the SCO.

    In 2011, Turkey announced plans to develop a missile with a maximum range of 2,500 kilometers, not revealing whether it would be ballistic or cruise. Although little information about the program has been released, a Turkish cabinet minister in January confirmed that Turkey possesses capabilities to produce a missile with a range of 800 kilometers.

    TUBITAK-Sage, an affiliate of state scientific institute TUBITAK, has been awarded the development contract and has indicated that it intends to test a prototype within the next two years. However, independent analysts say this development plan appears to be overly ambitious.

    Right now, the Turkish military’s space-based assets are geared more toward ISR missions, but Turkey has so far been dependent on other nations to launch its satellites.

    A Turkish earth-observation satellite named Gokturk-2 was launched from Jiuquan, China in December. The satellite designed and built by TUBITAK’s space technologies research unit, TUBITAK-UZAY, in cooperation with Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI). Gokturk-2 is Turkey’s second national satellite following RASAT, which also was developed by TUBITAK-UZAY and launched from Russia on Aug. 17, 2011.

    In early 2013, Turkey’s Defense Industry Executive Committee approved contract negotiations with TAI for domestic development of a synthetic aperture radar spacecraft dubbed Gokturk-3. And Turkey plans to launch Gokturk-1 in the next few years. Gokturk-1, under construction under a deal with Telespazio and Thales Alenia Space, is a larger and more powerful optical imaging spacecraft capable of sub-meter resolution that is similar to the French Pleiades earth observation satellites built by EADS-Astrium.

    According to a government road map for military and civilian satellites, Turkey plans to send into orbit a total of 16 satellites until 2020. A space industry expert based here said the next five years’ satellite contracts could amount to $2 billion.

    The Roketsan official said that the government would invest about $50 million in the planned UFS’ infrastructure, and another $50 million for the its electronics systems.

    Source: http://www.defensenews.com/article/2...Raise-Concerns
    I mean, it's hard the understand this statement, right ? Western allies probably NATO allies are afraid because their ally is going to enchance it's military capabilities. They should be happy about it, not afraid.

    What i believe is, they are afraid because Turkey's development, it's booming economy, it's rising influence in the region, can break US&EU influence in the region.

  12. #52
    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    [MENTION=43]safriz[/MENTION]

    You always slam Turkish people as being fake muslims. I will give you a better hand in this subject.

    Behold..... Adnan Oktar and his students.

    He has a tv channel that praises Islam 7/24. For more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adnan_Oktar





    His students.







    This girls are both his students and works in his tv. They use "inshallah" and "mashallah" in every sentence.
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  13. #53
    Senior Member Hope's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    They look revolting tartish and nothing to write home about. [MENTION=3907]Sinan[/MENTION] are you proud these people are Turkish because on the face of it id be distancing myself from this.
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  14. #54
    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by Hope View Post
    They look revolting tartish and nothing to write home about. [MENTION=3907]Sinan[/MENTION] are you proud these people are Turkish because on the face of it id be distancing myself from this.
    Mate, I not proud nor ashamed of these people. Every society has it's prostitutes, molesters, murderers, rapists. Me and my nation are not responsible for the acts of these individuals.

    As my personal opinion. I find these guys funny. They are acting like conservatives but dress like prostitutes. I couldn't decide what is the purpose of this group. I mean if you want to be taken in to consideration in religious issues, you should at least have a appropriate appearance but these guys have the opposite.

    I thought once "Are these women promoting themselves in the TV and work like a escort organization ? " But you can't find a pic of these girls, even with a male species. Nobody know their purpose in Turkey.
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  15. #55
    Senior Member Wajid47's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    NATO Proxies Turkey and Saudi Arabia Move to War Footing on Eve of Syrian ‘Peace Summit’

    The NATO-backed covert aggression against Syria could be reaching a tipping point for all-out war involving state forces. That should be no surprise. For the past 16 months, NATO and its regional proxies have been steadily increasing the violence and turmoil inside and outside Syria, while the Western corporate-controlled media maintain the ridiculous fiction that the bloody chaos is largely due to the government forces of President Bashar Al Assad cracking down on “peaceful protesters”.

    Ironically, the crisis is culminating at the same time that the United Nations convenes an emergency summit on Syria in Geneva this weekend. The meeting, which is ostensibly aimed at “reviving the Kofi Annan peace plan”, will be attended by the five permanent members of the UN security council and other “invited” regional states. The irony is that leading NATO members, the US, Britain and France, as well as their Turkish and Arab allies who will also be attending the crisis conference, are the very parties that have deliberately created the precipice for all-out war in the Middle East.

    As dignitaries fly into Geneva to “salvage peace in Syria”, there is a lockstep military build-up on the northern and southern flanks of Syria underway, with news that Turkey has dispatched battlefield tanks, missile batteries and heavy artillery to its Syrian border, while to the south Saudi Arabia has announced that its military forces have been put on a “state of high alert”.

    Ankara’s military mobilization along its 800km land border with Syria came within hours of the declaration by Turkey’s prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan slating Syria as “a hostile state”. The immediate cause of the deterioration in relations between the neighbouring countries is the downing of a Turkish fighter jet last week in Syrian territorial waters. Syria claims it was acting in self-defence after the Phantom RF-4E warplane entered its airspace on Friday. Ankara has so far failed to give an explanation for why one of its warplanes was making such a provocative low-flying manoeuvre into Syrian airspace. But the Turkish government has announced that any move by Syrian armed forces towards its border will be viewed as another “hostile act” that it will respond to. How’s that for a provocative tether? Especially towards a country that is being attacked by armed groups crossing over its border with Turkey.

    Meanwhile, on the same day that Turkey is militarizing along its border with Syria, Saudi Arabia’s King Abdullah makes an unprecedented announcement putting his armed forces on high alert “due to the tense situation in the Middle East”. Using vague and contrived language, the Saudi ruler warned against “foreign or terrorist attacks” to justify the mobilization of the kingdom’s armed forces.

    The military pincer movement against Syria tends to support the analysis that the downing of the Turkish fighter jet was a deliberate set-piece scenario designed to furnish a cause for war, or at least a stepping up of the international psy-ops campaign of intimidation against Syria.

    It is notable that the circumstances surrounding the shooting down of the warplane have yet to be clarified. The Syrians seem to have firm grounds for acting in the way they did given the provocative conduct of the Turkish fighter jet. And there is an onus on the Ankara government to give some explanation for the unusual military manoeuvre, especially in the light of claims that the aircraft was on a reconnaissance mission on behalf of anti-Assad forces on the ground in Syria. Yet almost reflexively, before details have been established about the incident, Turkey has moved on to a war footing. Equally telling is that Saudi Arabia, a key ally of Ankara in opposition to Syria, has simultaneously moved also on to a war footing – without any substantive grounds for such a mobilization.

    Some informed analysts have said that the Turkish-Saudi pincer on Syria is more aimed at intensifying the psy-ops pressure on Bashar Al Assad to cave in and relinquish power. Hisham Jaber, director of the Beirut-based Center for Middle East Studies, told Press TV that Ankara and Riyadh will balk at an all-out war with Syria because both are well aware that any such conflict will bring in Iran, Russia and China in support of their ally in Damascus.

    Nonetheless, there is an ineluctable logic towards all-out war. Ever since the armed insurrection by foreign mercenaries was instigated in Syria’s southern town of Deraa in mid-March 2011, Turkey and Saudi Arabia have played key roles in fomenting the covert campaign of aggression to overthrow the Assad government – a campaign that is authored by leading NATO members, the US, Britain and France. The division of labour is such that Turkey has supplied land bases to organize the mercenaries from Libya, Saudi Arabia, Lebanon and Iraq; while Saudi Arabia provides the money – up to $100 million – to buy weapons and pay wages for the soldiers of fortune; and ultimately it is Washington, London and Paris that are calling the tactical shots in the NATO war plan on Syria.

    As several other commentators have pointed out, this war plan is aimed at asserting Western capitalist hegemony in the oil-rich Middle East and Central Asia regions. Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Syria are part of an overarching bid for “full-spectrum dominance” that will eventually target, overtly, Iran, Russia and China.

    It is this crucial wider context of war-making by the waning capitalist powers that underscores the gravity of the military build-up inside and outside Syria. The dynamic for war has a compelling, nefarious logic – as the history of world wars testifies.

    Which makes the Geneva “crisis conference” this weekend appear all the more ludicrous. In attendance are the US, Britain, France, Turkey and the Gulf Arab monarchical states of Kuwait and Qatar. All are professing to support a peaceful solution in Syria even though all the above are funnelling weapons, logistics and personnel to wage a brutal, terrorist assault on that country – an assault that has now led to the precipice of all-out regional war.

    Also attending the UN conference are secretary general Ban Ki-moon and the UN/Arab League special envoy to Syria, Kofi Annan. The UN and the Arab League and these two figureheads in particular have shown themselves to be willing dupes to NATO’s war of aggression on Syria, and beyond, by indulging in the charade that the Western powers are “supporting peace” instead of denouncing them as “supporting war”. Significantly, the UN and Annan have not invited Iran to attend the conference as a result of US pressure. How provocative is that? Iran clearly has vital interests at stake given its proximity and geopolitical threats from the encroaching war on its Syrian ally.

    The other ghost missing from the feast in Geneva this weekend is Saudi Arabia. The omission of Saudi Arabia should not be seen as some kind of consolation to Syrian and Iranian sensibilities, but rather as a way of shielding the House of Saud from embarrassment. Considering the incendiary role of Saudi Arabia in Syria, and possibly the region’s conflagration, the Saudi rulers should be summoned to a top seat at the “peace summit” – to face the most withering questions about their warmongering, criminal interference in a neighbouring state.

    Then, using Nuremburg principles, prosecutors should proceed to arraign the rulers in Riyadh along with their accomplices in Washington, London, Paris and Ankara.

    http://www.globalresearch.ca/nato-pr...ummit/?print=1
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  16. #56
    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by Wajid47 View Post
    Ankara’s military mobilization along its 800km land border with Syria came within hours of the declaration by Turkey’s prime minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan slating Syria as “a hostile state”. The immediate cause of the deterioration in relations between the neighbouring countries is the downing of a Turkish fighter jet last week in Syrian territorial waters. Syria claims it was acting in self-defence after the Phantom RF-4E warplane entered its airspace on Friday. Ankara has so far failed to give an explanation for why one of its warplanes was making such a provocative low-flying manoeuvre into Syrian airspace. But the Turkish government has announced that any move by Syrian armed forces towards its border will be viewed as another “hostile act” that it will respond to. How’s that for a provocative tether? Especially towards a country that is being attacked by armed groups crossing over its border with Turkey.
    Regarding our downed jet. Officials already gave an explanation. RF-4E reconnaissance plane ( not a warplane ) was flying a mission regarding to enhance Turkish radar abilities. Plane intercourse have been given to international authorities before the flight and plane were unarmed. Plane violated Syrian airspace for 16 seconds and shot down without a warning.

    Well, if you decide to shot a Turkish Jet out of the sky.There will be some consequences, you have to face.
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  17. #57
    Facebook Editor safriz's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    [MENTION=3907]Sinan[/MENTION]..I have a lot to post about Turkey but it's only you here....
    Did the other turks chicken away because they dont have moderation rights over here?

  18. #58
    Elite Member Sinan's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by safriz View Post
    [MENTION=3907]Sinan[/MENTION]..I have a lot to post about Turkey but it's only you here....
    Did the other turks chicken away because they dont have moderation rights over here?
    Don't do it mate.... I always says this to western posters. Say anything Turks. We didn't known to be with our culture like Persians, scientists like Germans, politics like British, tech like Japanese, philosophers like Greeks.

    But never, ever accuse a Turk with having no courage.....

  19. #59
    Member Olcayto's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by safriz View Post
    [MENTION=3907]Sinan[/MENTION]..I have a lot to post about Turkey but it's only you here....
    Did the other turks chicken away because they dont have moderation rights over here?
    Wtf are you talking about mate?

    Why the heck should we be chickened away? Esspecially from someone like you.
    Behave safriz, behave dreamreaper.
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  20. #60
    Facebook Editor safriz's Avatar
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    Re: Turkey Affairs

    Quote Originally Posted by Olcayto View Post
    Wtf are you talking about mate?

    Why the heck should we be chickened away? Esspecially from someone like you.
    Behave safriz, behave dreamreaper.
    WTF...means What the Fcuk

    Stop being the usual Potty mouth ... and comment in a civil way....or did they never taught you civility in school?

    anyway what's your opinion about why so many Turkish Military and Police officers are adulterers...Read this report

    http://todayszaman.com/news-316439-i...port-says.html
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