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Thread: Egypt Military Coup - Morsi Elected government overthrown

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  1. #41
    Senior Member Mirza44's Avatar
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    Re: Full military coup' underway in Egypt, tanks & APCs seen on streets

    Dr. M. Morsi has been out and army has suspended the constitution.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Mirza44's Avatar
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    Re: Full military coup' underway in Egypt, tanks & APCs seen on streets

    Egypt's military deposed the country's first democratically elected president Wednesday night after he failed to meet demands to share power with opponents who thronged the streets of Cairo, state-run media reported.
    Troops moved into key positions around the capital and surrounded a demonstration by Morsy's supporters in a Cairo suburb as a 48-hour ultimatum from the generals expired. Citing an unnamed presidential source, the state-run newspaper Al-Ahram reported that "the General Command of the Armed Forces told President Morsy around 7 p.m. (1 p.m. ET) that he is no longer a president for the republic."
    The state-run Middle East News Agency reported Wednesday night that leaders of the country's Muslim and Christian communities would join military leaders and opposition figures to lay out an agreement "to exit the current political crisis."
    The report came shortly after a deadline issued by the generals to Egypt's first democratically elected leader expired. At the final hour, Morsy offered to form an interim coalition government "that would manage the upcoming parliamentary electoral process, and the formation of an independent committee for constitutional amendments to submit to the upcoming parliament," Morsy said in a posting on his Facebook page.

    He noted that hundreds of thousands of supporters and protesters had packed plazas around the country, and he urged that his countrymen be allowed to express their opinions through the ballot box.
    "One of the mistakes I cannot accept -- as the president of all Egyptians -- is to side with one party over another, or to present the scene from one side only. To be fair, we need to listen to the voice of people in all squares," the statement read.
    But as night fell Wednesday, Egyptian troops were taking control of key points around the capital and surrounded a pro-Morsy demonstration at a Cairo mosque. Gehad El-Haddad, a spokesman for the Muslim Brotherhood, reported via Twitter that tanks were on the streets.
    Morsy was said to be working from a complex belonging to the country's Republican Guard, across the street from the presidential palace, according to Egyptian state media. Reuters reported that troops were setting up barricades around that facility.
    In Washington, State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said the U.S. government -- Egypt's leading ally -- could not confirm reports of a coup. Psaki said the United States is not taking sides and urged all parties to come to a peaceful resolution to the "tense and fast-moving" situation.
    Coup allegation
    An aide, Essam El Haddad, said in a Facebook posting that a coup was under way and warned that the generals risked bloodshed by moving against Morsy.
    "Today, only one thing matters. In this day and age, no military coup can succeed in the face of sizable popular force without considerable bloodshed," wrote El Haddad, who works in the office of the assistant to the president on foreign relations. "Who among you is ready to shoulder that blame?"
    "In a democracy, there are simple consequences for the situation we see in Egypt: The president loses the next election or his party gets penalized in the upcoming parliamentary elections. Anything else is mob rule," he added.
    But Naguib Abadeer, a member of the opposition Free Egyptians Party, said what was under way "is not by any means a military coup. This is a revolution."
    "The people have decided that Mr. Morsy was no longer the legitimate leader of Egypt," he told CNN.
    Abadeer said Morsy lost his legitimacy in November, when he declared courts could not review his decrees and ousted the country's prosecutor-general. He said Morsy's supporters in the Muslim Brotherhood -- the Islamist movement that propelled Morsy to the presidency -- "hijacked the vote of the people" by running on a religious platform, "so these were not democratic elections."
    On Tuesday night, Morsy had vowed that he would not comply with the military's 48-hour ultimatum and demanded that the armed forces stand down.
    "If the price of upholding this legitimacy is my own blood, I am, therefore, ready to sacrifice my blood for this country and its stability," he said.
    But political analyst Hisham Kassem said the speech was Morsy's "final bluff."
    "He was trying to give the impression 'We are there in numbers, and we are going to retaliate, we are not going to allow this to happen.' However, with almost 24 hours since his message, it's clear his supporters will not dare challenge the crowds on the street," Kassem said.
    He added, "I think President Morsy effectively is no longer running the country." And faced with the throngs that filled Cairo's Tahrir Square, "the military had to intervene. Otherwise this crowd was going to get Morsy from his palace."
    Egypt's anti-Morsy protestors -- in their own words
    Reports of a TV studio takeover
    Reuters and several other news organizations reported that Egyptian troops had "secured the central Cairo studios of state television" as the deadline approached and that staff not working on live shows had departed.
    CNN has not confirmed the reports; state television denied in an on-air banner that there was any additional military presence at its studios.
    Massive demonstrations for and against the former Muslim Brotherhood leader who was elected to office a year ago have been largely peaceful.
    But 23 people died, health officials said, and hundreds more were injured in clashes overnight at Cairo University, the state-funded Al-Ahram news agency reported.
    Protest leaders have called for nonviolence.

  3. #43
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    Re: Full military coup' underway in Egypt, tanks & APCs seen on streets

    Morsi driven out by Egyptian army

    CAIRO, EGYPT: As the deadline set by the Egyptian army expired, troops rolled into Cairo and Alexandria and forced the democratically elected president Mohamed Morsi from his office.
    Troops took over the state television and late on Wednesday. Hours later, the Egyptian military commander General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi addressed the nation and laid out the road map for the return of democracy to the country.
    Al-Sisi said that the Egyptian Constitution was temporarily suspended, and that the Chief Justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court will be incharge for the transition period.
    He added that the Egyptian army acted after it was called on by the people to protect them. He added that President Morsi, despite numerous meetings and chances, failed reconciliation.
    Egypt President Mohamed Morsi has offered a consensus government, as the military’s deadline to the President to meet the demands of his people or face intervention expired on Wednesday at 4:30pm.
    Morsi rejected the ultimatum and insisted he would defend his constitutional legitimacy to the end, raising fears of a clash as supporters and opponents of the president took to the streets in their thousands.
    Egypt’s army commander and Morsi each pledged to die for his cause as a deadline neared on Wednesday that would trigger a military takeover backed by protesters.
    Military chiefs, vowing to restore order in a country racked by demonstrations over Morsi’s policies, issued a call to battle in a statement headlined “The Final Hours”. They said they were willing to shed blood against “terrorists and fools” after Morsi refused to give up his elected office.
    Less than three hours before the ultimatum was due to expire for Morsi to agree to share power or make way for an army-imposed solution, the president’s spokesperson said it was better that he die in defence of democracy than be blamed by history.
    In an emotional, rambling midnight television address, Morsi said he was democratically elected and would stay in office to uphold the constitutional order, declaring: “The price of preserving legitimacy is my life.”
    Liberal opponents said that showed he had “lost his mind”.
    Two army armoured vehicles took up position outside state broadcasting headquarters on the Nile River bank and most staff were evacuated from the building, security sources said.
    The state news agency MENA said civil servants were occupying the cabinet office and would not let Prime Minister Hisham Kandil enter the building.
    The official spokesperson of Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood movement said supporters were willing to become martyrs to defend him.
    “There is only one thing we can do: we will stand in between the tanks and the president,” Gehad El-Haddad told Reuters at the movement’s protest encampment in a Cairo suburb that houses many military installations and is near the presidential palace.
    “We will not allow the will of the Egyptian people to be bullied again by the military machine.”
    The Egypt25 television station owned and run by the Brotherhood was continuing to broadcast live split-screen coverage of pro-Morsi demonstrations.
    The state-run Al-Ahram newspaper said Morsi was expected to either step down or be removed from office and the army would set up a three-member presidential council to be chaired by the head of the Supreme Constitutional Court.
    A military source said he expected the army to first call political, social and economic figures and youth activists for talks on its draft roadmap for the country’s future.
    Political sources said armed forces commander General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi met the main liberal opposition leader, Nobel peace laureate Mohamed ElBaradei, the heads of the Muslim and Christian religious authorities and leaders of smaller parties on Wednesday. A military source denied that Sisi and ElBaradei were meeting.
    A military spokesperson said there was no time set for an official statement or speech by the armed forces command.
    Sisi had called in a statement on Monday for Morsi to agree within 48 hours on power-sharing with other political forces, saying the military would otherwise set out its own roadmap for the country’s future.
    More than 20 people have died and hundreds have been injured in clashes between Morsi’s supporters and opponents since the eruption of mass protests on June 30.
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    Elite Member sparkling's Avatar
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    Re: Full military coup' underway in Egypt, tanks & APCs seen on streets

    The Egyptian military is being deployed to separate pro-regime supporters at the Rabaa Al-Adawiya mosque and anti-Morsi protesters in front of the Ittihadiya presidential guard headquarters, Ahram Online reported.

    Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi reportedly has been isolated and transferred to a Defense Ministry site, Al Arabiya TV reported.

    Authorities have been told to keep any politicians belonging to religious parties from leaving Egypt, an official source at Cairo's airport said, BBC Arabic reported.

    Ninety-three Egyptian diplomats, including some in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and some based abroad, declared a strike, according to MENA news agency, Ahram Online reported.

    About 20 armored personnel carriers have been deployed near a local mosque in Suez where supporters of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi are rallying, Ahram Online reported.

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    Re: Full military coup' underway in Egypt, tanks & APCs seen on streets

    When Morsi and his friends are done, there will be nothing that can kickstart democracy again.

    The generals will be in their new offices and everyone will be relieved for a few months. Food and electricity will be available and then there will be a clamour for elections.

    The generals will say ''not this year, its too unstable, maybe next year etc..'' anyway ''we gave you a chance before and look what happened''.

    Why will it be too unstable? Because the backdrop of of Syrian islamist degeneracy will be irresistable for egyptian islamists robbed of their election. This coup confirm to them the right way is the gun way and they may even bring Homs to Cairo.


    There is the other alternative - The Pakistan scenario, Sounds familiar? whereby military and elected civilian governments pass the baton to each other every few years. The environement is different though.
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    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt coup

    Even after the dust settles Egypt will be a polarised and divided country open to manipulation from external players keen to further their own agendas

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    Elite Member sparkling's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt coup



    the new egyptian transitional president " adly mansour " - chief of constitutional court
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    Re: Egypt coup

    Let's say that this all goes smoothley, Morsi is removed, the army turn over power and new democratic elections.

    Whoever will get elected is going to look to neuter the army, so they won't be the next to be removed.

    Even if Egypt will get a perfect government, the country is in a very rough shape and will require some very serious reforms in order to get back on track and such moves will be painful at first, which will make people angry again.

  9. #49
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    Re: Egypt coup

    The threat of violence has put many on alert in Egypt after the deposing Morsi

    As Egypt's military announced it had deposed the country's first-ever democratically elected president, many Egypt watchers braced to see whether Mohamed Morsi's Islamist followers would resort to violence as they said they would.

    Radical Islamists such as Mohamed al-Zawahiri, a leader of Egypt's radical Jihadi movement and the brother of al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahiri, promised his followers Wednesday they would have "the upper hand" should the military follow through with its threatened coup. A day earlier, Morsi made a speech promising to defend his right to the presidency with his blood.

    At least 16 people were killed overnight in clashes at Cairo University, where pro-Morsi demonstrators had gathered. Throngs of his followers in the Muslim Brotherhood surrounded his headquarters with hardhats and shields promising to protect him.

    Experts say the words are matched by stockpiles of weapons that have grown since the end of civil war in Libya, next door, and through smuggling routes that run from Sudan through Upper Egypt to the Sinai Peninsula.

    A military coup feeds into the narrative of Jihadi radicals such as al Qaeda, who have long argued that advancing their ideology cannot be accomplished by democratic means, but only through violence, says Shadi Hamid, director of research at the Brookings Doha Center.

    "It provides real ammunition for al Qaeda and other extremist groups that have been arguing for years that change is not possible through democracy, and violence is the only way," Hamid said.

    Mohamed al-Zawahiri told the Egyptian paper Al-Masry al-Youm Tuesday that "If the United States or its agents in Egypt make an impetuous move towards confrontation, that will surely be in our favor. We have nothing to lose."

    In Morsi's hometown of Sharqiya, the Salafi Jihadi organization issued a statement supporting the president and declaring "war against the armed forces" who would oppose him. And the group's leader, Shalabi al-Awady, aka Abu Osama, accused the Liberal Muslim opposition of apostasy.

    "They are at war with the application of Sharia, which makes them apostates who should be killed in order to prevent sedition," al-Awady said, according to the paper.

    Morsi had said in a speech Tuesday night that "If protecting the legitimacy (of the electoral results) requires my own blood, then I am willing to do this."

    Morsi's speech "was an open incitement to violence," said Michael Wahid Hanna, an analyst at the Century Foundation, a think tank in Washington.

    State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said violence is a concern, and urged all sides to talk to each other.

    "We're clearly concerned about the violence on the ground and the fact this is an extremely tense situation," Psaki said.

    Citing background briefings by U.S. government officials, Hanna said weaponry has flowed out of Libya to Egypt, mostly small arms including machine guns and rocket propelled grenades. And there are links between radical Islamist militants in Egypt and similar groups in Libya, Hana said.

    More and heavier weapons have been stored in the Sinai, where the presence of radicals has been growing since the overthrow of former President Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.

    "This has all been compounded by a security vacuum since the fall of Mubarak," when Egyptian security institutions that repressed extremists and dissent were weakened, Hanna said.

    The Muslim Brotherhood and their security guards have weapons, and civilians do too, Hanna said. "You see it in street clashes now more than ever before," he said.

    Hamid said the Brotherhood has no trained fighting force, and would be up against "the military with the majority of the people on its side," but he still expects violence, especially from Morsi's more radical supporters.

    Many will see this as yet another opportunity to enact religious law yanked from their hands.

    After Egypt's military coup, fear of clashes

    ================

    Hopefully the military will win over enough of the Islamist leadership to minimize any potential violent fallout from the military coup and prevent a repeat of the events that followed the military overthrow of a potential Islamist government in Algeria.

    This situation could have been handled constitutionally in multiple ways, instead, the Egyptian military may have sown the seeds of an extremist violent religious movement.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Pak92's Avatar
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    Saudi king congratulates Egypt's new interim president

    Saudi King Abdullah Bin Abdul Aziz congratulated the newly-appointed Egyptian interim President, Adly Mansour, on Wednesday.
    “In my own name and on behalf of the people of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, I congratulate you on assuming the leadership of Egypt at this critical point of its history,” said the king in a cable carried by the Saudi Press Agency (SPA). “By doing so, I appeal to Allah Almighty to help you to shoulder the responsibility laid on your shoulder to achieve the hopes of our sisterly people of the Arab Republic of Egypt.”
    King Abdullah also praised the armed forces, saying: “At the same time, we strongly shake hands with the men of all the armed forces, represented by General Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, who managed to save Egypt at this critical moment from a dark tunnel God only could apprehend its dimensions and repercussions, but the wisdom and moderation came out of those men to preserve the rights of all parties in the political process.”
    “Please accept our greetings to you and deep respect to our brothers in Egypt and its people, wishing Egypt steady stability and security.”
    Meanwhile, the United Arab Emirates is following with satisfaction the developments in Egypt, UAE Foreign Minister Sheikh Abdullah bin Zayed Al Nahyan said on Wednesday.
    He said that his country is confident that the Egyptian people will be able to overcome the current difficult situation “to reach a safe and prosperous future,” the Emirates News Agency (WAM) reported on Wednesday.
    The UAE foreign minister also said that the Egyptian army proved that it was a “strong shield” and “protector,” which – he added – guarantees the country embraced all components of the people.
    He also said that the UAE will continue to strengthen its bilateral relations with Egypt.
    Jordan also commented on the latest developments in Egypt, Al Arabiya correspondent reported. The kingdom said it respected the wishes of the Egyptian people as well as the role of the armed forces.
    The Egyptian army chief, Abdel Fattah al-Sissi, ousted Islamist President Mohammad Mursi on Wednesday and announced the head of the Supreme Constitutional Court caretaker leader.

    http://english.alarabiya.net/en/News...president.html

  11. #51
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt coup

    I think the Egyptian Army has set a bad example. Clearly this is the rule of the mob. I dont particularly like Morsi but he should have been allowed to run his term.

    Problem is that these dictators like Mubarek did not allow oppositions to flourish so often the only organised grouping is the the likes of the Islamic brotherhood.

    Egypt is a very divided society and I expect no good to come out of there in the near future.

    I mean lets say the elect someone else. What happens when Morsi's 13 million followers come on the street? The Army going to wade in again??

    I notice the US are not calling it a coup. maybe cos they cant give military aid of 1,2 bill if it admits its a coup.

    Would the world be silent if it was the reverse ie the brotherhood on the streets? Leading to the removal of a liberal President?
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  12. #52
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    Re: Egypt coup

    Egypt crisis: Interim president to be sworn in after Morsi ousted

    The top judge of Egypt's Constitutional Court, Adly Mansour, is to be sworn in as interim leader, hours after the army ousted President Mohammed Morsi and put him under house arrest.

    Army chief Gen Abdul Fattah al-Sisi announced the move on Wednesday, in what Mr Morsi said was a military coup.

    Gen Sisi said Mr Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected leader, had "failed to meet the demands of the people".

    The move comes after days of mass rallies against the Islamist president.

    Protesters accused him and the Muslim Brotherhood of pursuing an Islamist agenda for the country and of failing to tackle Egypt's economic problems.

    The BBC's Kevin Connolly in Cairo says the president had appeared to protesters to be economically out of his depth, and had not given them the reassurances they wanted that he could address rampant poverty.

    Some 50 people have died since the latest unrest began on Sunday.

    US concern

    Mr Morsi's opponents celebrated through the night in Cairo's Tahrir Square, after the army announced it had suspended the Islamist-backed constitution - approved by a referendum in 2012 - and pledged to hold new elections.

    But a number of people were killed as clashes erupted overnight between Morsi supporters and the security forces in Cairo and Alexandria.

    Gehad el-Haddad, a spokesman for Mr Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood, told the BBC the ousted leader had been put under house arrest and the "entire presidential team" was in detention.

    Mr Haddad's father, senior Morsi aide Essam el-Haddad, and Saad al-Katatni, head of the Brotherhood's political wing, are among those held.

    The state-run al-Ahram newspaper reported that arrest warrants had been issued for 300 leaders and members of the Muslim Brotherhood.

    US President Barack Obama has said he is "deeply concerned" by the latest turn of events and called for a swift return to civilian rule.

    The removal of the president followed four days of mass protests against Mr Morsi and an ultimatum issued by the military, which expired on Wednesday afternoon.

    In his televised speech, Gen Sisi said the armed forces could not ignore the call of the Egyptian masses.

    He spoke of a new roadmap for the future, and said Mr Mansour would be given the task of "running the country's affairs during the transitional period until the election of a new president".

    Mr Mansour was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Constitutional Court only four days ago, and was sworn in to that office on Thursday morning. He is the scheduled to be sworn in as head of state later.

    The army moved quickly after Gen Sisi's speech, with military vehicles seen fanning out across the capital.

    TV stations belonging to the Brotherhood went off air and state news agency Mena said managers at the movement's Misr25 channel had been arrested.

    A notice on Mr Morsi's Facebook page condemned the "military coup".

    The statement asked Egyptian citizens to "abide by the constitution and the law and not to respond to this coup".

    Mr Morsi, who had pledged his life to defend constitutional legitimacy, accused the army of "taking only one side".

    In Tahrir Square thousands of anti-Morsi protesters celebrated with fireworks and honking car horns.

    One protester, Omar Sherif, told AFP news agency: "It's a new historical moment. We got rid of Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood."

    The BBC's Kevin Connolly in Cairo says no-one knows what will happen next. The danger, he says, is that both sides will try to settle differences by bringing supporters on to the streets.

    The army has said it will not allow that to happen but, our correspondent says, it will not be easy to stop.

    After Gen Sisi's address, both Pope Tawadros II - the head of the Coptic Church - and leading opposition figure Mohammed ElBaradei made short televised speeches about the new roadmap for Egypt's future which they had agreed with the army.

    Mr ElBaradei said the roadmap aimed for national reconciliation and represented a fresh start to the January 2011 revolution.

    Opposition leader and former Arab League chief Amr Moussa told AFP that consultations for a government and reconciliation "will start from now".

    Discontent

    Mr Morsi became Egypt's first Islamist president on 30 June 2012, after winning an election considered free and fair following the 2011 revolution that toppled Hosni Mubarak.

    However his term in office was marred by constant political unrest and a sinking economy.

    The mass protests at the weekend that led to the army's intervention were called by the Tamarod (Rebel) movement, in response to worsening social and economic conditions.

    But there has been a growing sense of discontent since last November, when Mr Morsi issued a controversial constitutional declaration granting himself extensive powers.

    His moves to entrench Islamic laws and concentrate power in the hands of the Muslim Brotherhood also alienated liberals and secularists

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-23176401

  13. #53
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    Re: Egypt coup

    The military's move against the Morsi and co was well planned. Intervention must have been in the mind army chief for some time. Muslim Brotherhood activists were arrested. Islamist TV stations were taken off the air.

    In the elections that followed the Arab uprisings of 2011, the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood, and its offshoots across the region, did extremely well. That was because it was well organised, with a reputation for honesty, and took advantage of the failure of secular parties to organise themselves.

    Lets see what happens next. A very immature and silly people imo

    But now the Egyptian army has inflicted a serious blow on the Muslim Brotherhood. One question is whether the Brotherhood will be forced back underground, as it was when it was banned in the years before 2011.

    The Brotherhood foreswore violence many years ago. However, there are jihadist groups in Egypt that have not. The army has calculated it can handle any trouble. But it is playing for high stakes - the future of Egypt.

  14. #54
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    Laser pens light up Egypt protests



    As crowds packed Tahrir Square in the centre of Cairo to celebrate the overthrow of President Mohammed Morsi on Wednesday night, three things filled the air - noise, fireworks and, unusually, laser beams.

    The use of laser pens has become a distinctive feature of the protests against the country's leadership, which began at the end of last month.

    The mostly green beams of light were seen illuminating military helicopters as they flew over the square a few days ago.



    But the military were not the only focal point of the crowd's laser beams. After Morsi was ousted, some of the tens of thousands in Tahrir Square turned their pens on the balcony being used as a broadcast point by the BBC. BBC Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen was picked out by the green light of laser pens during this live report.

    TV correspondents filing for other broadcasters also got this new form of laser treatment. So why are they being used? Mostly just for fun, according to the BBC's Angy Ghannam in Cairo. "It started as a way to check the rooftops of buildings to get a feel if someone is there, such as snipers," our reporter says. "They are sold like crazy at the square. Street vendors are all over the place. "Anything at the square turns into a trend and a fashion in no time."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-maga...nitor-23178484

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    Egypt's military arrest Muslim Brotherhood supreme leader

    Mohammed Badie arrested in coastal city near Libyan border, officials say, as Adli Mansour sworn in as interim head of state

    Egypt's new military rulers have arrested the Muslim Brotherhood's supreme leader, security sources say, and issued warrants for up to 300 other members hours after ousting the elected president, Mohamed Morsi, and taking him and his aides into military custody.

    The day after a momentous night in Cairo has revealed the full extent of the military overthrow, with key support bases of the Muslim Brotherhood, including television stations, closed down or raided.

    Security officials told the Associated Press and Reuters that the Brotherhood's supreme leader, Mohammed Badie, was arrested in a coastal city near the Libyan border on Wednesday and flown to Cairo in a military helicopter.

    The Brotherhood spokesman Gehad el-Haddad said he could not confirm the reports because the group had lost their lines of communication to Badie.

    Prosecutors said on Thursday morning they were seeking Badie's arrest and that of his deputy, Khairat el-Shater, for inciting violence against protesters outside the Brotherhood's headquarters in Cairo on Sunday night, when eight protesters were killed.

    The dramatic events of the last day have been welcomed by many in the capital, where most state institutions, including the security establishment, had steadily abandoned Morsi since Sunday.

    Adli Mansour, the head of the constitutional court, was sworn in as interim head of state on Thursday. In his first remarks as leader, he praised the protests that preceded Morsi's removal and said they had "corrected the path of the glorious revolution" that brought down the former dictator Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.

    "I look forward to parliamentary and presidential elections held with the genuine and authentic will of the people," Mansour said in a televised address.

    The epicentre of the latest revolt, Tahrir Square, was teeming with up to one million revellers until well past midnight. The crowds were reportedly the largest the square had seen at any point since the first stirrings of revolution in 2011, spilling over two bridges across the Nile and into the west of the city.

    Elsewhere in Egypt, where backing for the Brotherhood had remained solid despite Morsi's political tribulations, the reaction to his ousting has been far from celebratory. Up to 10 people died in clashes, and more than 400 were reported wounded, in the hours following the military chief Abdul Fattah al-Sisi's announcement that he had ended Morsi's presidency. Rallies are expected in many parts of the country throughout Thursday and are likely to be met by a prominent military presence.

    The international response to the coup has so far been muted. Barack Obama is expected to make a statement at some time on Thursday. The US president had been supportive of the democratic ballot that elected Morsi in June 2012. Arab world leaders are understood to be considering how to deal with yet another seismic shift in the political landscape at a time of profound and ongoing regional instability.

    The strongest response was from Turkey's government, which like Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood has Islamist roots. The foreign minister, Ahmet Davutoğlu, said the overthrow of Morsi was a military coup and unacceptable. The Tunisian ruling party Ennahda condemned a "coup against legitimacy".

    The coming days are likely to prove crucial across Egypt, as the military strives to assert itself in a transition it will guide, with nominal civilian leadership, towards new parliamentary and presidential elections.

    The Muslim Brotherhood will also find itself under pressure to react to the ignominious ousting of its chief patron, and the man who guided it to political legitimacy eight decades after the group's inception throughout the rule of the former president Hosni Mubarak when it remained outlawed.

    Muslim Brotherhood leaders have pledged to conduct peaceful protests in response to Morsi's ousting. However, before the coup two of the former president's aides said no political leader could control the anger of the people.

    "In the space of one night we are back 60 years," said Amr Darrag, a senior Muslim Brotherhood member and former minister for international co-operation. "All of our leaders are being arrested in the middle of the night. Their houses are being stormed. Their children are being scared. All of our remaining leaders are banned from travel and this is just the start.

    "Yesterday we were part of the government doing what we thought was best for Egypt. Even if you don't agree with us, this has gone too far."

    Mansour's installation as interim of head of state caps a rapid rise for the head of the supreme constitutional court, who was appointed chief justice only on Sunday – timing that coincided with the first day of mass protests against Morsi.

    Egypt's civilian opposition as well as senior Muslim and Christian leaders are likely to play prominent roles in a transition period. The military has cast itself as a reluctant overlord and has not yet specified how long it will remain in effective control.

    Wednesday's coup followed several weeks of attempts by Morsi to reach out to opposition groups. The ousted leader's aides insist he had been prepared to enter into power-sharing arrangements, but had been rebuffed at every turn.

  16. #56
    Senior Member Hope's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt's military arrest Muslim Brotherhood supreme leader

    The ones arrested should have been the Army generals

  17. #57
    Senior Member Mirza44's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt's military arrest Muslim Brotherhood supreme leader

    With fall of Muslim Brotherhood, is Hamas at risk?

    CAIRO -- As the sudden fall of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood reverberates through the Middle East, perhaps nowhere are events being watched more anxiously than in Gaza Strip, the seaside enclave controlled by the Islamist group’s Palestinian spinoff, Hamas.

    Seeing its Egyptian mentor swept from power after only one year has unnerved many Hamas leaders, despite the group’s tight political and security control over Gaza.

    Hamas leaders so far have said little publicly. "The movement does not interfere in Egyptian affairs," Hamas lawmaker Yahia Moussa said Thursday.

    But the ousting Wednesday of Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi was a stinging setback for the Gaza militant group, which lost its most powerful benefactor in a groundswell of public unrest.

    Like the Muslim Brotherhood, Hamas has struggled to balance its Islamist and militant roots with the realities and responsibilities of governing. And like its Egyptian brethren, Hamas has been criticized for failing to deliver. Gaza’s 1.5 million residents remain locked in poverty and isolation, in part because Hamas is widely labeled a terrorist organization and isolated by Israel and the much of the West.

    Already some Hamas rivals from the Palestinian secular faction Fatah are predicting that Gaza residents also will rise up.

    Hamas spokesman Ihab Ghussein insisted the group is not worried, labeling talk of a revolt “ridiculous.”

    Still, it's an abrupt turn of events for Hamas. When Morsi ascended to power a year ago, Hamas leaders were almost giddy, confidently predicting that the Brotherhood’s rise would give them new leverage in confrontations with Israel and Fatah, which is based in the West Bank. They expected that closer ties with a Muslim Brotherhood-controlled Egypt would throw open the Rafah border crossing, end Gaza’s international isolation and keep Israel’s military at bay.

    Those hopes never fully materialized, even though relations between Hamas and Egypt improved vastly compared to those seen under former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who viewed Hamas as an enemy.

    Morsi surprised many by continuing some of his predecessor’s border restrictions on Gaza, particularly after militants linked to Gaza killed Egyptian security officers in the Sinai Peninsula in August and used the restive desert region as a launching pad to attack Israel.

    Morsi’s alliance with Hamas didn’t prevent Israel from launching an eight-day air offensive against Gaza in November, though his intervention may have helped prevent a broader ground invasion.

    And despite Egyptian mediation efforts, a reconciliation deal between Hamas and Fatah remains a distant dream.

    Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood also helped protect Hamas from Egypt’s military, which always distrusted the Gaza group. With Morsi’s ousting, Egypt’s military has reasserted itself as the dominant political force in Egypt.

    “Hamas is the biggest loser,” said Mukhaimar abu Saada, political science professor at Gaza City’s Al Azhar University. He said Hamas leaders are already concerned that Egypt’s interim government will impose tighter border controls and crack down on smuggling tunnels used to import fuel.

    “Don’t forget that the Egyptian opposition views Hamas as a party to the conflict and accuses it of destabilizing the Sinai,” Abu Saada said. “Hamas now fears that the continuing crisis in Egypt will lead to further actions against it.”

    Others predict Morsi’s downfall will further radicalize Hamas and sour the group on efforts to bring Western-style democracy to the region. Morsi supporters complain that he was swept away by military force despite being elected.

    Hamas likewise has fumed that its 2006 election victory was never accepted by the international community, despite the West’s repeated calls for democratic reforms and nonviolence.

    Emboldened by Morsi’s rise, Hamas over the past year had attempted to impose stricter Islamic laws in Gaza, moving to segregate schools by gender, cracking down on women smoking or wearing low-cut jeans and forcing young men into barbershops to change their Western-style haircuts.

    Before he was replaced, Morsi was also criticized for spending too much time pursuing a conservative Islamist agenda that did nothing to alleviate economic problems and alienated much of Egypt’s secular and non-Muslim population -- just the accusations that could eventually undermine Hamas’ rule in Gaza.

  18. #58
    Member Durrani's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt coup

    the military ousted out a democratically elected leader. LOL!

    Its all Deja vu again like the 1953 bloodless coup agianst Mohammad Mossadegh.

    Don;t be surprised if a hardline Sunni Muslim regime comes into Egypt now in the future.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_I..._d%27%C3%A9tat

    I wouldn't be surprised if outside powers were behind Morsi's ousting.

  19. #59
    Administrator Aryan_B's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt coup

    TBH I personally was no fan of Morsi. But how come that the west is quite when a democratically elected President is overthrown. The Egyptian Army is a disgrace and they are sowing the seeds of future discord. Some 13 million people voted for Morsi. What happens if they come to the streets?

    The Egyptian Army is funded by the Americans and GCC including Saudis and what not. The Egyptian Army would not dared to act without a nod from their funders

  20. #60
    Member Durrani's Avatar
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    Re: Egypt coup

    Quote Originally Posted by Aryan_B View Post
    TBH I personally was no fan of Morsi. But how come that the west is quite when a democratically elected President is overthrown. The Egyptian Army is a disgrace and they are sowing the seeds of future discord. Some 13 million people voted for Morsi. What happens if they come to the streets?

    The Egyptian Army is funded by the Americans and GCC including Saudis and what not. The Egyptian Army would not dared to act without a nod from their funders
    I support Morsi if he was bringing in Sharia.

    Morsi was a democratically elected leader. Why is all western governments staying quiet?

    I don't know why he ousted out by the military.

    So much for democracy. lol.

    Egypt in 2013 is where Iran was in 1953 during the Abadan crisis. Back to square one, back to the military-monarchy system, lol.
    Last edited by Durrani; 4th July 2013 at 23:58.

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