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  1. #41
    Senior Member manuu's Avatar
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    Pakistan wants to have a sustained relationship with US: Nisar

    ISLAMABAD: Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan on Friday said that Pakistan wants to have a long term, sustained and multifaceted equation with the United States.

    This was stated by the interior minister during his meeting with Mr Richard G. Olson, US Ambassador to Pakistan who called on Nisar at Punjab House today.

    During the meeting, both diplomats discussed Pak-US bilateral relations, regional security situation and the recent visit of the interior minister to the US.

    Nisar said that long term relations with the US would not only contribute towards bringing the two countries closer to each other but would also contribute significantly towards the promotion of regional peace and development.

    The interior minister also said that peace in the region was a shared objective of the two countries and close collaboration and enhancing multifaceted cooperation between the two countries was of great significance for achieving shared goals.

    Nisar also appreciated the White House initiative of convening a conference on countering extremism as he believed that the need to have serious discussions and deliberations on this issue was never as great as it is today.

    The interior minister reiterated his call that strengthening local communities, winning the trust of mainstream peace-loving majority and building resilience in local communities against radicalization is need of the hour.

    He maintained that by addressing the push factors that drive people towards extremism and focusing on education to promote tolerance could form the conceptual bedrock for the global action plan in dealing with violent extremism.

    “US administration and President Obama's stance is clear in differentiating between extremism and Islam,” the minister remarked.

    Ambassador Olson said that the United States was committed to further strengthening its bilateral relations with Pakistan and enhancing cooperation on issues of mutual concern.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1167785/pak...-with-us-nisar

  2. #42
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Make of it what you will - remember US is the world's only super power - reports of it's death are exaggerated -- but then some people offer that good policy begins with the identification and pursuit of national interests and CREATES buy in by internal and external stake holders, other think that this is BS and that internal and or external stake holders simply give policy to officials - Pakistanis must decide which they prefer - it really is their choice to make, but isn't this a two street? Yeah, I suppose Pakistanis can decide that as well.



    Better relations with the US?
    Thomas Houlahan
    Monday, September 21, 2015




    This is the 25th year of my involvement in Pakistan-US relations. For these twenty-five years, I’ve worked for better relations between our two countries, explaining Pakistan to people who are pretty ignorant about it, but now I’ve decided to stop – for Pakistan’s sake.

    Something happened recently that slapped me into reality. I was making a deposit at a bank. As I am a Pakistan Cricket supporter, and have a friend with the PCB, I was wearing a Pakistan Cricket jersey and a hat with a Pakistani flag on it.

    You don’t see much apparel with ‘Pakistan’ on it in Washington,” the teller said. He was actually from Pakistan and mentioned that Pakistan wasn’t very popular in the States.

    I really didn’t need to be told that. Every year, a survey comes out showing the most and least popular countries among Americans. Every year, Pakistan is the third least-popular country, behind only North Korea and Cuba. I have a sneaking suspicion that due to the thaw in relations with Cuba, Pakistan will be second from the bottom this year.

    It finally dawned on me that this is no accident. This is the result of a concerted slander campaign by the US government and the think tanks who feed off of it. That campaign has been effective. Ask any American the first thing that pops into his head when he hears ‘Pakistan’ and it will usually be either ‘terrorist supporter’ or ‘double game’.

    The ‘double game’ slander is particularly offensive, coming, as it does, from functionaries of a government that itself has been playing a double game. Since 9/11, US officials have been flying to Islamabad and talking about how much the United States values the alliance. As soon as their planes touch down in Washington, they tell everyone who will listen that Pakistan cannot be trusted.

    A lot of this is just plain bigotry. Whether they admit it or not, most officials seem to see their mission as bringing the benefit of white civilisation to the little brown people. The fact that government offices in Islamabad are full of people with degrees from Oxford, Cambridge, or the London School of Economics does not shake their belief that they need to civiliwe Pakistan. The chief difference between Americans and Pakistan’s former British rulers is that at least the British respected the culture and the people – Americans don’t. Most Americans don’t respect any Muslim culture.

    And that’s the rub. No matter how westernised a Pakistani might be, to most Americans, he’ll never be anything more than a wog. US government officials constantly wring their hands about the Islamisation of Pakistan’s officer corps. What they are really seeing is proud, patriotic men who are done trying to be more Western just to please people who are never going to respect them anyway. They are Pakistanis now, with all that means. The Americans can like it or lump it.

    The rest of Pakistan should take a cue from that, because, let’s face it, all Pakistan gets out of this ‘alliance’, in addition to the scorn referred to above, is disastrous advice and grief. Yes, there is USAID, but it should just leave Pakistan for all the good it does. Pakistan also had its soldiers bombed by the US Air Force and there have been at least two military incursions by American forces onto Pakistani soil without government permission, the first resulting in the deaths of sixteen innocent, unarmed civilians shot at close range. Pakistan’s ‘ally’, having gotten it into a war, and, having pulled its troops out of that war, now stands ready to fight the War on Terror to the last Pakistani.

    The alliance with the United States is just too one-sided and too expensive in blood and treasure for Pakistan. It isn’t worth wasting time and effort courting goodwill from a bad-faith ‘partner’ that is never going to give it. And, Pakistan doesn’t need better relations with the United States. It has China, and the Chinese seem to like Pakistan just the way it is. No demands. No unwanted advice. No racism. China has been a real, all-weather ally. Pakistan needs American goodwill the way a snake needs a set of golf clubs.


    The writer is an associate at the Center for Security and Science. He has served in the New Hampshire legislature and as an election monitor in Pakistan.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Nabeel's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Whilst American foreign policy is formulated by AIPAC it is unlikely to be sincere with any Muslim country. Especially one with nukes and a large standing army

  4. #44
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by Nabeel View Post
    Whilst American foreign policy is formulated by AIPAC it is unlikely to be sincere with any Muslim country. Especially one with nukes and a large standing army

    So it is AIPAC that is standing in the way of better relations between Pakistan and the US? It all boils down to AIPAC, an external group that makes policy and gives it to US policy officials who then dutifully carry it out?? Have I summarized your position accurately?, If yes, would you care to clarify or do you think it needs no further elaboration?

    Is Mr. Houlahan, in your opinion correct about bigotry between the the duplicity of US officials, or do you think strategic Information Operations are designed effect changes within a target population group by creating incentives, by channeling the responses to the operation in specific outcomes?

  5. #45
    Senior Member Nabeel's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    So it is AIPAC that is standing in the way of better relations between Pakistan and the US? It all boils down to AIPAC, an external group that makes policy and gives it to US policy officials who then dutifully carry it out?? Have I summarized your position accurately?, If yes, would you care to clarify or do you think it needs no further elaboration?

    Is Mr. Houlahan, in your opinion correct about bigotry between the the duplicity of US officials, or do you think strategic Information Operations are designed effect changes within a target population group by creating incentives, by channeling the responses to the operation in specific outcomes?
    IMO it is one of the factors often not highlighted that has an adverse effect but of course it would be naive to think that it is the onoy factor in play but both are distrustful of each other and both have given each other reason to have distrust of each other

  6. #46
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Angry America, gets angrier - stupid is as stupid duz:



    Spying Case Against U.S. Envoy Is Falling Apart, and Following a Pattern

    By MATT APUZZO, MARK MAZZETTI and MICHAEL S. SCHMIDT
    OCT. 10, 2015


    Robin L. Raphel, right, a State Department adviser, meeting with Sartaj Aziz, Pakistan’s national security adviser, in Islamabad in 2013. Ms. Raphel has been the target of a spying investigation. Credit B.K. Bangash/Associated Press



    WASHINGTON — Last fall, federal agents raided the home and office of Robin L. Raphel in search of proof that she, a seasoned member of America’s diplomatic corps, was spying for Pakistan. But officials now say the spying investigation has all but fizzled, leaving the Justice Department to decide whether to prosecute Ms. Raphel for the far less serious charge of keeping classified information in her home.

    The fallout from the investigation has in the meantime seriously damaged Ms. Raphel’s reputation, built over decades in some of the world’s most volatile countries.

    If the Justice Department declines to file spying charges, as several officials said they expected, it will be the latest example of American law enforcement agencies bringing an espionage investigation into the public eye, only to see it dissipate under further scrutiny. Last month, the Justice Department dropped charges against a Temple University physicist who had been accused of sharing sensitive information with China. In May, prosecutors dropped all charges against a government hydrologist who had been under investigation for espionage.

    Ms. Raphel, in negotiations with the government, has rejected plea deals and has been adamant that she face no charges, according to current and former government officials, particularly because the Justice Department has been criticized in recent years for handing out inconsistent punishments to American officials who mishandle classified information.

    Both the Justice Department and a lawyer for Ms. Raphel, Amy Jeffress, declined to comment.

    The Raphel case has also been caught in the crosswinds of America’s tempestuous relationship with Pakistan, a strong Cold War alliance that has frayed since the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks amid recriminations between Washington and Islamabad. Ms. Raphel has for decades been at the center of shaping American policy toward Pakistan, and she has maintained close ties to Pakistani officials even as many of her colleagues became disenchanted with what they saw as Islamabad’s duplicity in the fight against terrorism.

    Against that backdrop, the federal investigation has delved into the murky world of international statecraft, where diplomats exert influence through a careful dance of trading, sharing and eliciting information. Some American investigators viewed Ms. Raphel’s relationships with deep suspicion.


    Those suspicions became a federal investigation last year when American officials, while eavesdropping on a Pakistani government official, intercepted a conversation that seemed to suggest that Ms. Raphel, an adviser at the State Department, was passing American secrets to Pakistan. The reason for the eavesdropping is unclear, but the government routinely listens to the phone calls and reads the emails of foreign officials.

    After months of secret surveillance, the investigation into Ms. Raphel spilled into the public when agents searched her home and her State Department office last October. She was quickly stripped of her security clearances and left in the dark about the precise origins of the federal investigation. Her friends said that the investigation had taken a deep emotional toll.

    Sometimes the whiff of scandal can be worse than any actual scandal,” said Husain Haqqani, a former Pakistan ambassador to Washington who has known Ms. Raphel for years. “More people hear that you were investigated than care to know you were cleared or never actually charged.”

    American officials will not discuss what classified information the investigators found in Ms. Raphel’s home. The current and former American officials who discussed the case did so on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk about it publicly.

    Over the years, the stories of American officials mishandling classified information have at times seemed as peculiar as they were serious. John P. O’Neill, a counterterrorism specialist for the F.B.I., once lost a briefcase full of government secrets in a Florida hotel. Samuel R. Berger, the national security adviser to President Bill Clinton, stole classified documents from the National Archives and hid them under a construction trailer. As attorney general, Alberto R. Gonzales took material about the nation’s warrantless wiretapping program home with him.

    One C.I.A. director, John M. Deutch, stored classified information on his home computer. Another C.I.A. director, David H. Petraeus, shared his highly classified journals with his mistress, then lied to the F.B.I. about it. Hillary Rodham Clinton used a private email system when she was secretary of state that investigators say contained classified information, although Mrs. Clinton and the State Department say the information was not marked as classified.

    The punishment for mishandling classified information has varied wildly. Mrs. Clinton has not been charged with wrongdoing. Mr. Berger pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor. Mr. Deutch received a pardon from Mr. Clinton and was never charged. Mr. Gonzales and Mr. O’Neill were not charged. In the most recent case, the Justice Department allowed Mr. Petraeus to plead guilty to a misdemeanor, despite strong objections from investigators. That deal was so contentious that the F.B.I. director, James B. Comey, personally appealed to the attorney general, Eric H. Holder Jr., and said that Mr. Petraeus’s crimes warranted felony charges, according to two government officials involved in the case. F.B.I. agents are still angry about that decision and say it set a standard that will make it harder to bring cases in the future.

    In discussions with prosecutors, according to several government officials, Ms. Raphel and her lawyer have cited the Petraeus case as the vital precedent. If passing secrets — including notes on war strategy and the names of covert officers, which Mr. Petraeus shared — and lying about it amount to a misdemeanor, then, Ms. Raphel says, she should not face any charges.

    Some American investigators remain suspicious of Ms. Raphel and are loath to abandon the case entirely. Even if the government cannot mount a case for outright spying, they are pushing for a felony charge related to the classified information in her home. Several officials acknowledged, however, that the case would be difficult to prosecute because it would require intelligence agencies to declassify information and would probably reveal secrets about American surveillance of foreign officials.

    Felony charges for improperly taking and storing classified information, while not espionage in the common sense of the word, would be filed under the Espionage Act and could expose Ms. Raphel to years in prison — a far stiffer penalty than Mr. Petraeus and others received.

    The news of the investigation has shaken policy circles in Washington, where Ms. Raphel has been a fixture as a diplomat, a South Asia expert in the private sector, and a lobbyist. She began her career as a C.I.A. analyst but moved quickly to the State Department, which sent her to Islamabad in the mid-1970s. It was during this posting that she met and married Arnold L. Raphel, another foreign service officer. In 1988, while he was America’s ambassador to Pakistan and after he and Ms. Raphel had divorced, Mr. Raphel was killed in a plane crash with the Pakistani president, Mohammed Zia ul-Haq.

    During the Clinton administration, Ms. Raphel served as the assistant secretary of state for South Asia, and then ambassador to Tunisia. In the George W. Bush administration, she was the State Department’s coordinator for reconstruction in Iraq, where she tried to guide the war-torn country toward a stable government and economy. After retiring from the government in 2005, she joined Cassidy & Associates, a Washington lobbying firm that represents the Pakistani government, among other clients.

    At the start of the Obama administration, Richard C. Holbrooke, the State Department’s special representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan, reached out to Ms. Raphel to work with him. She quit her lobbying job and was sent as a State Department contractor to the American Embassy in Islamabad, where she helped disburse American aid to Pakistan. Until the F.B.I. investigation, she continued to work on contract as an adviser on Pakistan and Afghanistan.


    During her long career working on Pakistan issues, Ms. Raphel has seen the country go from being one of America’s most steadfast Cold War allies — and a partner in the 1980s effort to train Afghan fighters to expel Soviet troops from Afghanistan — to being something of a pariah to Washington. Although Pakistan pledged support for the campaign against Al Qaeda and the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks, senior members of both the George W. Bush and Obama administrations became convinced that Pakistani soldiers and spies were aiding the Taliban and other militant groups by attacking American troops in Afghanistan.

    For their part, Pakistani officials stoked fury in the country about the C.I.A.’s campaign of drone strikes and what they came to see as the agency’s expansion operations in Pakistan.

    As relations between the two countries deteriorated, Ms. Raphel was considered one of Pakistan’s few remaining supporters in the top echelon of American government. This earned her enemies among government officials in India, Pakistan’s archrival, but also among colleagues who considered her too sympathetic toward an unreliable ally.


    I don’t think it was very fashionable to say, ‘I think the Pakistanis have a point,’ but Robin did that,” said Cameron Munter, the former American ambassador to Pakistan who oversaw Ms. Raphel’s work in Islamabad.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Felix's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    How far fetched? Why would she be a target for spying?

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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by Felix View Post
    How far fetched? Why would she be a target for spying?

    I think you are missing the depth of the fanatical hatred of Pakistan there is in certain sections of the US government, I don't mean the administration, I mean the government and include the armed forces in it. Similarly you do not appreciate the reality of the US, going against a generally held idea, is not just dangerous, it's stupid, because it will attract attention of those who have the authority to make your life difficult.

    There are two important points in the article, the authors, who are mouth pieces for what is called in the US "the Intel Community", present these two ideas by spacing fodder between the two ideas:

    the Ideas are :

    1. The case against Robin Raphel was built on eavesdropping by US "intel community" and turns out is nothing she be tried in courts of law for - the way I read this, is that there is significant political pressure to "get " her.

    2. Robin Raphel rubbed the Indians the wrong way (read the entire article, this is presented at the very end) and she rubbed her own people the wrong way, by saying "the Pakistanis have a point"


    No damn Pakistani has any point worth consideration by any US official.

    Late October, NS will visit DC at the end of October of this year - If you will review published material, there is already a concerted effort by Indians, read Mr. Farid Zakaria and former "Intel community" types to apply pressure on the Pakistan Armed Forces, to get the Indian and the US, and the US's satraps, some succor in Afghanistan - as carrot, the US will in return for Pakistan surrendering it's nuclear autonomy, "eventually" backdoor the Pakistanis in to the NSG, Pakistanis have been "backdoored" by the US so often, that the US do not see much reason why the Pakistanis would object to one more time.

    Remember RS will be a non-entity by then, the Premier's party is not going to allow a fair election in Takht e Lahore, so things will look good for NS, and the rest of the bunch, particularly the PPP will have little to fear -- if the US can apply greater pressure on the Pakistani armed forces, all the better, NS, can always claim, he cannot spend anymore on cleaning up Waziristan, and KHI, which will also mean that cleaning Punjab is out of the question -- US pressure to deliver the Taliban, yet again, so that the US and it's Afghans can again reject talks is a given, it will provide the necessary security situation to ensure US maintains troops longer than it has earlier announced.

    Pakistan are on record as saying that they will try again, however, the die is already cast, the Afghan want the Pakistanis to kill the Afghan Taliban and send what remains to talk "reconciliation", in other words, the role for Pakistan is to commit suicide in Afghanistan, or risk being killed there - Chinese and Russians should find the option interesting.

  9. #49
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Focus on the end of October - by now if it is not clear, it will never be clear to the US, that the political and security set up in Afghanistan cannot survive. The way the political set up is, it is more interested in going after each other's throats than the Talib's. And the so call National Army and national police are no match for the Talib, Kunduz made it clear, but what is clear in the rest of the world does not necessarily mean clear in the US.

    To do list for Pakistan:

    1. Agree to restrict the range of your weapon delivery system - AKA forget about being in space
    2. Agree to intrusive monitoring of your nuclear assets
    3. Agree to talk "terrorism" with the Indian, Kill Hurriyet, give up on the Captive kashmir
    4. Kill the Talib and present his corpse at the negotiating table.
    5. Forget about Afghanistan
    6. Assure us about Gwadar (read no Chinese ships or submarines in Gwadar unless you want to see spikes in terrorism in Balouchistan and have the UN recognize separatists in Balouchistan as "genuine represertatives of the people"
    7. No more money unless you deliver -- and we can always give your opposition the details of your stash abroad, you don't want that. do you?
    The Following User Says Thank You to Muse For This Useful Post: sami


  10. #50
    Senior Member sami's Avatar
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Some Americans do have a hatred for Pakistan. A hatred fanned by AIPAC and Israel imo

    Good that AIPAC dont have much say in China or Russia

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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by sami View Post
    Some Americans do have a hatred for Pakistan. A hatred fanned by AIPAC and Israel imo

    Good that AIPAC dont have much say in China or Russia
    You complete under rate the political power of Indians in the US - inform yourself, especially inform yourself about how deeply involved and accepted Indians are within the political process in the US.

  12. #52
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    You complete under rate the political power of Indians in the US - inform yourself, especially inform yourself about how deeply involved and accepted Indians are within the political process in the US.
    You mean Hindus don't mince words with me sir. That has been facilitated by AIPC.

    But Indians are good at choosing number 2. They chose Soviets when America was 1 and now America are on their way to 2 Indians choose them
    The Following User Says Thank You to sami For This Useful Post: Muse


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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by sami View Post
    You mean Hindus don't mince words with me sir. That has been facilitated by AIPC.

    But Indians are good at choosing number 2. They chose Soviets when America was 1 and now America are on their way to 2 Indians choose them
    I genuinely think that you will be surprised.

  14. #54
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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    You complete under rate the political power of Indians in the US - inform yourself, especially inform yourself about how deeply involved and accepted Indians are within the political process in the US.
    It's not just India but Iran, Afghanistan, Tajikistan who are not at all convinced with Pak army selective operations in FATA. The higher than himalaya friend is tolerating it for known reason but they might get involved in hard talks if Afghan loses control of northern regions which share border with China over a thin stretch.

    1. Agree to restrict the range of your weapon delivery system - AKA forget about being in space
    => Doesnt concern India. This is coming from Israel lobby.
    Space rocket needs billion $ investment. South Korea & Brazil both operate indigenous fighter/comerical jets; but have been struggling in space program for 2 decades..

    2. Agree to intrusive monitoring of your nuclear assets
    =>How do you expect to join NPT after such a clean trac record, Khan network.
    North korea made bombs with a q khan's proliferated components

    3. Agree to talk "terrorism" with the Indian, Kill Hurriyet, give up on the Captive kashmir
    =>Americans have openly said that Kashmir is India Pak issue. They have no interest.
    Why doesnt Pakistan declare to India & West that it cant give up LeT & other good terrorist assets.

    4. Kill the Talib and present his corpse at the negotiating table.
    => You get paid for it. Not that difficult to kill few rogues and ask others to shun violence and work towards peaceful AfPak region
    5. Forget about Afghanistan
    =>They are not your colony. At max you can use soft diplomacy, economic leverage, religion and pashtoon connection to impress upon them

    6. Assure us about Gwadar (read no Chinese ships or submarines in Gwadar unless you want to see spikes in terrorism in Balouchistan and have the UN recognize separatists in Balouchistan as "genuine represertatives of the people"
    => Americans have supported Gwadar, CPEC but they dont want Chinese naval base

    7. No more money unless you deliver -- and we can always give your opposition the details of your stash abroad, you don't want that. do you?
    => Aid always comes with conditions.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Mohan Tiwari For This Useful Post: Muse


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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    [MENTION=126]PoKeMon[/MENTION]

    All clever responses -- Where have clever responses gotten you guys?? You live in a advertising myth, shining this and that, and that's your prerogative, as is being so clever - leave the results of how to deal with the US to those who actually have experience of other than saying "yes" .

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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by sami View Post
    You mean Hindus don't mince words with me sir. That has been facilitated by AIPC.

    But Indians are good at choosing number 2. They chose Soviets when America was 1 and now America are on their way to 2 Indians choose them
    I personally like No. 2 more than No. 1 since there is always something associated with No. 1 that doesn't goes well with me and there is always some leverage one can have on No. 2.

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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by Muse View Post
    [MENTION=126]PoKeMon[/MENTION]

    All clever responses -- Where have clever responses gotten you guys?? You live in a advertising myth, shining this and that, and that's your prerogative, as is being so clever - leave the results of how to deal with the US to those who actually have experience of other than saying "yes" .
    Can you deny that fact that our advertising(though may not be always true) has done well for us? Afterall we are selling India and we need to lure investors and India diaspora along with Indian netizens are doing fabulous work in setting up a positive image world over.

    On the contrary, pakistanis dont spare their country in ridiculing on open platforms, marginalizing their own institutions and government. Why shall one look toward you if you yourself saying we are bad?

    Cant say more truth than that, but we Indians are not oblivious of our true standing, but we put India first when having a public discourse.
    [MENTION=1244]Muse[/MENTION]

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    Re: Pakistan US relations

    Quote Originally Posted by PoKeMon View Post
    Can you deny that fact that our advertising(though may not be always true) has done well for us? Afterall we are selling India and we need to lure investors and India diaspora along with Indian netizens are doing fabulous work in setting up a positive image world over.

    On the contrary, pakistanis dont spare their country in ridiculing on open platforms, marginalizing their own institutions and government. Why shall one look toward you if you yourself saying we are bad?

    Cant say more truth than that, but we Indians are not oblivious of our true standing, but we put India first when having a public discourse.
    You should never post when you are angry - you have a short fuse, and don't think, you just react -- Advertising, AKA Tableeq AKA propaganda, is not necessarily false - but really Shining India, with people so desperate they are committing suicide or any number of soial and political and economic malaise?

    "We" should always be truthful with ourselves, unfortunately, here and elsewhere, some play the "professional" Indian, The "professional" Jewbot, etc; somewhere along the line you will become "persons" and become aware that there is little that is hidden, whether good or bad, whether right or wrong.

    In an another thread I informed Mohan, though, I think I did not do a good job, but I wanted him to understand why I thought, Also see the post you responded to above, Pakistani society had become stronger, through it's many failures and it could not happen without first acknowledging the failures - now if Pakistanis do little other than empty "triumphalism", because they can point success, their very survival is a giant one, what would be the point? what would be learned other than learning over again, peoples capacity to lie to themselves and to not acknowledge reality??

    Putting India first ought not mean empty lies, at least not to thinking people. A better India is not possible without acknowledging that it is not at present nor will ever be, because it is a constant struggle, the India we should wish it were - We are proud to put Pakistan out to dry, because there are "persons" who not only empathize but are willing to help, but they can help only after we discuss what is or are the maladies.

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    Richard Olson will be new US special envoy for Pak-Afghan region

    WASHINGTON: The Obama administration has appointed outgoing US ambassador to Pakistan as the new US Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan (SRAP).

    He succeeds Dan Feldman who concluded his tenure on Sept 18 this year.

    “Ambassador Olson will assume his responsibilities as SRAP on Nov 17, after concluding his service as the US Ambassador to Pakistan,” the US State Department announced in a press release.

    Like his predecessors, Ambassador Olson will be responsible for developing and implementing policies and programmes that support US national security interests in promoting stability and increasing prosperity in Afghanistan and Pakistan, the US State Department said.

    Olson is the first US ambassador to Pakistan who has been appointed to this post and brings extraordinary experience in the region, the department's press release said.

    He has been serving as US Ambassador to Pakistan for the last three years. Before Islamabad, Olson served as the Coordinating Director for Development and Economic Affairs at the US Embassy in Kabul from 2011 to 2012, overseeing all US non-military assistance programmes and support for the Afghan government.

    He also served as US Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates from 2008 to 2011.

    Olson is a member of the Senior Foreign Service, and has served at the US Department of State since 1982.

    Olson was sent to Islamabad in 2012 after Ambassador Cameron Munter resigned from the office amidst tensions between Washington and Islamabad.

    David Hale will be replacing Olson in Islamabad. Hale was nominated for the position by President Barack Obama. The US Senate has already confirmed Hale’s appointment, who was the US ambassador to Beirut before his transfer to Islamabad.

    Olson’s appointment as SRAP comes at a time when the United States and its Afghan allies face resurgent militancy in Afghanistan. As SRAP, he is also expected to play a key role in the reconciliation process which seeks to end hostilities between the Afghan government and the Afghan Taliban.

    Earlier on Thursday, US President Barack Obama also urged Pakistan to help restart the stalled process.

  20. #60
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    Re: Richard Olson will be new US special envoy for Pak-Afghan region

    A new thread? There an entire sticky for this --- See Pak US relations

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