Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 47

Thread: Assam conflict - updates

Share             
  1. #1
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan

    Clashes over land erupt in India's northeast

    Army sent to halt deadly dispute between Bengali settlers and local Bodo villagers that killed at least 11.

    India's army has moved in to stop armed clashes between settlers and local villagers that have killed at least 11 people in the northeastern state of Assam over the past two days.

    Land disputes between the ethnic Bodo community and Bengali Muslim settlers led to the clashes in Kokrajhar district, nearly 250km west of Gauhati, the capital, SN Singh, an inspector-general of the state police, said on Sunday.

    The clashes began on Friday after assailants killed one person. As the violence spread to more than half a dozen villages in the region, nearly 7,000 people fled their homes and took refuge in state-run relief camps, Singh said.

    State authorities called in the army and imposed a night curfew in the region on Saturday. No fresh clashes have been reported since then.

    Animosity and accusations of land-stealing have long simmered between Bodos and the thousands of mostly Bengali Muslim settlers, many of whom came from the former East Pakistan before it became Bangladesh in 1971.

    The two groups have clashed sporadically since 1990s and burned each other's homes and property, state officials said.
    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/asia/2...824093134.html
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix


  2. #2
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8,846
    Thanks
    5485
    Pakistan UK
    May all the victims RIP - This sort of anger and feuds are common in our region. I hope authorities clamp down on these clashes.
    The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to KingKong For This Useful Post: Express,Felix,Naveed HRitom


  3. #3
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    10,678
    Thanks
    7341
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Thousands flee Indian villages as clashes kill 18

    GAUHATI: Tens of thousands of villagers have fled their homes in fear of rioting that has killed at least 18 people in recent days in the remote northeast Indian state of Assam, police said Monday.

    An additional 10 people have gone missing since the clashes over land rights erupted in western Kokrajhar district between the region’s ethnic Bodo community and Muslim settlers, Assam’s police chief J.N. Choudhury said.

    The violence has spread to two neighbouring districts. Police have discovered bodies hacked by machetes and left in the jungle or along roadsides or river banks.

    India has sent troops in to quell the clashes, and opened at least a half-dozen shelters for some 30,000 people, mostly women and children, who have fled their villages in search of protection.

    Animosity and accusations of land-stealing have long simmered between Bodos and the thousands of mostly Bengali Muslim settlers, many of whom came from the former East Pakistan before it became Bangladesh in 1971.

    The two groups have clashed sporadically since 1990s and burned each other’s homes and property, state officials said.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Express For This Useful Post: Felix


  4. #4
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Amsterdam
    Posts
    11,721
    Thanks
    8138
    Pakistan Netherlands

    Why is Assam burning?

    Why is Assam burning?


    Aijaz Zaka Syed
    Friday, July 27, 2012
    The writer is a Gulf-based commentator.

    Most editors are failed writers, argued T S Eliot. By the same logic, television hosts must be failed politicians and activists, I guess. Every time I watch folks like Bill O’Reilly of Fox News and Arnab Goswami of Times Now, I am reminded of the Spanish Inquisition.

    While O’Reilly has spawned around himself an alternative universe of his own where Islam is out to capture the West and America and the shadow of Islamist terror is lurking in every nook and corner, our own answer to Murdoch’s hatchet man likes to think he’s holding his own court every night where he has to tackle the formidable challenges facing the great democracy with his profound wisdom and vision and come up with instant solutions.

    With his full court in attendance and the whole nation dutifully watching and listening to him, Arnab is the judge, jury and executioner as he rails and rails against the usual suspects. It’s an endless treat to watch the Times Now host as he addresses the nation from his pulpit with the choir earnestly nodding in agreement, and angrily demands answers from the politicians – usually the prime minister himself, no less.

    Forever outraged, our hero truly thinks he is God’s gift to mankind and has been sent down to watch over the national interests. And everyone is accountable to Arnab Goswami. While he finds something or the other to be outraged about every night, nothing gets him going like the never-ending shenanigans of our Western neighbours who are apparently forever plotting against Mother India. If it’s not Pakistan, then it’s Indian Muslims or “international Islamist terrorists,” who deserve his outrage. In any case, as far as he is concerned they are all one and the same!

    The latest to provide grist to the Times Now mill is the unfolding mayhem in Assam, the Indian state bordering Bangladesh. Scores have been killed in attacks largely targeting Muslims and hundreds of thousands have fled their homes. While the state government blames both sides-Bodo tribesmen and Bengali-speaking Muslims – for the violence, the majority of the victims are once again Muslims.

    Entire villages have been burnt down while the state administration, as is our tradition, remains curiously clueless and indifferent. Delhi insists Assam chief minister Tarun Gogoi is “monitoring the situation” and doing everything possible to restore peace. This is little comfort to the community, though, which increasingly lives in fear, worrying the worst may be yet to come. Gogoi is yet to visit the affected areas. Not even a flying, whirlwind tour for the cloistered satrap.

    There are reports of totally deserted villages and total absence of security forces in the troubled areas. While police are patrolling urban areas, it’s free-for-all for marauding mobs in interiors.

    Assam has a long history of recurring violence targeting minorities. However, what remains forever seared in public memory is the 1983 Nellie massacre when Indira Gandhi ruled from Delhi with her famous iron fist. The pogrom, carried out with crude weapons in a matter of a few hours, left 1,819 people dead. Independent sources suggest the toll was as high as 5,000. The killers didn’t even spare young babies.

    As usual, Muslims were caught in the deadly games of the Congress and assorted separatist groups. Our Hindutva benefactors added fuel to the fire by raising the spectre of invasion by Bangladeshi Muslims. The same drama is being re-enacted today with consequences that could be even deadlier. Yet unlike in the past, this conflict isn’t communal or religious in nature. It’s an economic struggle for the land and dwindling natural resources.

    In the end, it’s a humanitarian tragedy, and which is how it should be viewed. People hadn’t even recovered from the havoc wreaked by one of the worst floods in history when they were driven from their homes by people with whom they have lived for decades.

    Even Arnab Goswami opening the discussion on Assam began by arguing that no one should “communalise” the issue. Yet, this is precisely what he and his guests ended up doing. Instead of showing some sympathy for the victims and what they have just been through, all Muslims are there condemned as “Bangladeshi infiltrators.” Indeed, the nation is warned of “thousands of international Islamist fundamentalist terrorists with heavy weapons invading from across the border.” Not surprisingly, there was no one to present the other side of the storym except for a state minister who kept mumbling, “I don’t disagree with you.”

    In fact, listening to the finger-wagging television pundits you would think the entire Northeast has been taken over by Bangladeshi infiltrators and Pakistani terrorists and Delhi and thousands of its security forces and intelligence agencies haven’t the faintest idea.

    Extreme as it is, Times Now – from the Times of India stable – is hardly an exception. There are many out there who routinely tap into this reservoir of hatred and our deep-seated fear of the Other.

    Is this how responsible media should function? What’s the difference between this scaremongering and the Nazi demonisation of Jews? As journalism students and rookies, we were told ad nauseam by our teachers and editors that the media’s job is to inform, educate and act as a watchdog of society. A journalist’s job is to speak the truth and report facts as truthfully as possible and let people draw their own conclusions. The media’s job is to stand up for the weak, not join the witch hunt.

    Many from my tribe routinely quote C P Scott, the legendary editor of The Guardian, that comment is free but facts are sacred. How many of us really believe in it, though? How many of us pause and ponder before passing off blatant lies, innuendos and our prejudices as facts, endangering lives and putting an entire community in the dock?

    If I had been one of those watching that Times Now “debate,” I would have probably rushed to join the bloodthirsty mob rampaging across Assam to teach a lesson to the “international Islamist terrorists,” as Arnab calls those fear-stricken, bruised and battered people running for their lives with their humble belongings.

    But all this is in a day’s work for television pundits and journalists. Who gives a damn who killed whom and what havoc your words wreak in an already inflamed land, as long as you have your TRPs up and your audiences suitably agitated. That’s what this is all about, isn’t it? So what if Assam has always had a large Muslim population, as much as 30 percent, and most of those being terrorised as “outsiders” have been there for ages, since long before the Partition.

    Of course, given the porous and indistinct nature of the India-Bangladesh border, it’s possible some Bangladeshis might have now and then crossed over to this side. But as Congress leader Digvijay Singh points out, there has been a similar movement of migrants from the Indian side as well. With the Bangladeshi economy doing well in recent years, people have been moving to work in Bangladesh. Besides, weren’t we all part of one country not long ago?

    The BJP has a point when it claims all this is a result of the Congress’s vote bank politics. Indeed, successive Congress governments have used Assamese Muslims as little more than a vote bank without recognising their rights.

    If it were serious about the well-being of Muslims as well as other communities, it would have taken steps to cool down this simmering volcano that erupts from time to time. There’s no peace where there’s no justice. Muslims, or for that matter any other community, need no special treatment. They just need what’s their due. Recognise everyone’s rights and give their due. That’s the only way to lasting peace in Assam.

    http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-New...-Assam-burning
    The Following User Says Thank You to Neo For This Useful Post: Spring

    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

  5. #5
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan

    Assam conflict - updates

    Assam violence: AIMIM says Muslims being targeted

    AIMIM leader and Congress MP Asaduddin Owaisi on Saturday came out strongly against the ongoing violence in the Kokrajhar and surrounding regions in Assam saying that Muslims were being systematically targeted in the state.

    "We want a CBI inquiry into all that has happened. Muslims have been systematically targeted in the violence," he said.

    He added, "Assam has a secular government and yet selective cleansing is happening here. We have asked the PM to look into the matter. He has assured he will speak to CM Tarun Gogoi."

    He further demanded that a human rights team and the minority commission visit the affected areas in the state.
    http://ibnlive.in.com/news/assam-mus...689-3-251.html
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix

    Last edited by bilalhaider; 28th July 2012 at 13:05.

  6. #6
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan

    Assam conflict - updates

    Please post the updates of the Assam violence in this sticky thread.
    The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix,Naveed HRitom


  7. #7
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Srinagar protests against killing of Muslims in Assam

    Srinagar: Dozens of people on Thursday gathered here to denounce the ethnic riots in Assam and the killings of Muslims in Myanmar.

    The protesters demanded the dismissal of the Assam government and imposition of President's rule in the state to end the bloodshed that has left about 40 people dead in Bodo-Muslim clashes.

    The demonstration was organised by the Jammu and Kashmir National Panthers Party's youth wing.

    The protesters also shouted slogans against the US and Israel, and appealed to President Pranab Mukherjee and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to mount pressure on the Myanmar regime to end killings of Muslims. The protesters dispersed peacefully.
    http://post.jagran.com/srinagar-prot...sam-1343290506
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix


  8. #8
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan
    India's PM promises help to riot victims

    India's prime minister has promised to help hundreds of thousands of survivors of ethnic rioting in the country's northeast that killed at least 53 people.

    Manmohan Singh flew on Saturday to Kokrajhar district, one of the worst affected by the clashes between ethnic Bodos and Muslim settlers in Assam state, and met with people in two relief camps in the area's main city.

    Singh called the fighting "a blot" on the country and promised the families of those killed compensation.

    The killing of four Bodo men last week sparked the violence. While the rioting is now mostly under control, thousands of troops continue to patrol the districts of Kokrajhar, Dibrugarh and Chirang. Night curfews are also in place in several areas.

    The fighting forced about 400,000 people to flee their homes in western Assam. Thousands of wood and thatch houses have been razed to the ground.

    The government has set up about 270 camps to house the survivors.

    The clashes between Bodos and the Muslim settlers, who mostly came from the former East Pakistan before it became Bangladesh in 1971, mainly involve land rights. The two groups have clashed repeatedly over the years but the recent violence is the worst since the mid-1990s.
    http://www.aljazeera.com/news/asia/2...819365333.html
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix


  9. #9
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    10,678
    Thanks
    7341
    Pakistan Pakistan

    Mamata Banerjee slams 'deplorable' violence in Assam

    KOLKATA: Chief minister Mamata Banerjee on Thursday termed the ethnic violence in Assam as 'deplorable' and said the state would provide shelter to refugees fleeing the trouble-torn districts.

    "The situation in Kokrajhar and other districts in Assam where the conflict is on is deplorable ... Bengal will give shelter to the people coming from Assam in the wake of the conflict," she said on the sidelines of a function to launch an employment bank and social security card at the Netaji Indoor Stadium. "The administration in the bordering districts have given shelter to those leaving Kokrajhar. It is our social responsibility to provide them shelter and food even if we are half-fed," Mamata said.

    The chief minister also appealed to political parties to behave in a restrained manner and not to incite any violence in the present volatile condition in Kokrajhar. In an apparent snub to CPM, which has urged the assembly speaker Biman Banerjee to send an all-party delegation to north Bengal areas bordering Assam, she said no attempt should be made to incite communal passion over the issue. "Do not play this nasty politics", she said.

    Opposition leader Surjya Kanta Mishra had met the speaker on Wednesday and urged him to send an all-party delegation. He said: "If the chief minister feels that the all-party delegation is being sent to incite violence then it is unfortunate."

    He also added: "I believe the Centre, too, has sent a similar delegation to Assam, are they also inciting violence? A Left Front delegation will leave on Friday for Jalpaiguri and Alipurduar where the influx is more." CPM leader Anisur Rehman, who will lead the team, said they would leave today and visit Kumargram, Salmoni and Barovisha. "Our mission is to call for maintaining peace and harmony," he said.

    Mamata added, "There is a crisis-like situation in Kokrajhar. People from the neighbouring state (Assam) are coming to our state. I have not said a single word about this. Rather the police and the administration are accepting those who are coming here with love and giving shelter to them."

    Mamata Banerjee slams 'deplorable' violence in Assam - The Times of India
    The Following User Says Thank You to Express For This Useful Post: Felix


  10. #10
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Fresh violence in India's Assam state

    The death toll in the violence in India's Assam state has risen with the death of three more people.

    The police said the three were killed in Kokrajhar district, taking the toll in recent violence to 64.

    More than 170,000 people have fled their homes after fighting between indigenous Bodo tribes and Muslim settlers in Kokrajhar and Chirang.

    There has been tension between indigenous groups and Muslim Bengali migrants in Assam for many years.

    Senior Assam police official LR Bishnoi told the Press Trust of India news agency that three people were killed in Ranibui village in Kokrajhar late on Monday after some "Bodo miscreants fired indiscriminately".

    A curfew has been imposed in Kokrajhar after the incident.

    Police say that the clashes began last month when unidentified men killed four youths in Kokrajhar, an area dominated by the Bodo tribe.

    They say that armed Bodos attacked Muslims in retaliation, suspecting they were behind the killings.

    Soon afterwards unidentified groups set houses, schools and vehicles ablaze, police said, firing indiscriminately from automatic weapons in populated areas.
    BBC News - Fresh violence in India's Assam state
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix


  11. #11
    Senior Member Neo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Amsterdam
    Posts
    11,721
    Thanks
    8138
    Pakistan Netherlands
    Reading the Assam violence
    By Kunal Majumder
    Published: August 7, 2012

    Last week, I was having an intense argument with an old friend, who is a hardcore RSS-BJP supporter, on the issue of violence in Assam on Facebook. Like most of the right wing and perhaps, many in India, he blamed the reason for the riots on illegal Bangladeshi immigrants. I agreed with him that illegal immigration is indeed a problem for India. You have people from neighbouring countries coming to India taking our jobs, benefiting from India’s social programmes, imposing their language and even religion. I argued, “I completely agree with you. To begin with, we should scrap the India-Nepal friendship treaty and stop the Nepalese from entering India at free will”. He, a Nepalese himself, immediately said, “No. Not the Nepalese but only the Bangladeshis”. I asked, “Why? Why not you and your entire breed who come to India from Nepal?” His reply was simple: “Because we are Hindus. Hindustan is for Hindus”. Ideally, I would have been shocked at this statement but that day I saluted him. I felt for the first time someone who is sympathetic to the RSS-BJP did not put up the garb of nationalism and truly spoke his communal mind out.

    My argument with this friend perhaps, represents the dilemma that many Indians are undergoing on the issue of illegal Bangladeshi migrants. At one hand, intrusion of illegal migrants in states like Assam and Tripura is creating huge demographic and cultural changes; on the other hand, protests against these migrants are often dubbed as communal because most of them are Muslims. When the violence between Bodo tribes and Bengali Muslims in Assam’s Kokrajhar district broke, media in mainland India could not understand what exactly to call the conflict. Is it a communal issue or an ethnic one?

    We, Indians, have a tricky relationship with religion. Some of us will try everything possible to shift the focus from religion, while others will try to do everything to bring religion into everything. When news of Kokrajhar violence reached New Delhi, the BJP was quick to call it a communal issue. It called it the “communal experiment” of Assam’s Chief Minister Tarun Gogoi. Assamese and Assam watchers like me watched in horror. In the last election, the BJP had tried hard to use this angle to make some dent into the Congress vote bank but failed. As clearer news reports finally arrived, it was clear that the whole thing seemed to have been planned by extremist elements of Bodo tribes. They have been demanding a separate state for years now. Most of the 50 dead were Bengali Muslims or alleged ‘Bangladeshis’.

    As former chief minister of Assam and leader of opposition Prafulla Kumar Mahanta explained to me, the Bodos have become a minority in their own region and that’s why they are retaliating. “I don’t think it is a communal issue but an ethnic and immigration issue,” he says. Even his bete noire in state government, Power Minister Pradyut Bordoloi, agrees it is not about religion but he feels that the people of Assam have to get used to the fact that there are people in the state who do not speak their language or follow their culture. “These are people who came from the other side (Bangladesh) before 1971 and have been settled here. We have to accept them as one of us,” he says. But that is a very simplistic argument. Since 1971, there has been a huge jump in the Muslim population of Assam — by some accounts, nearly a 77 per cent increase. Four districts neighbouring Bangladesh became Muslim majority in 1991, followed by three in 1998 and one as of late. Many blame this on intrusion of Bangladeshis. The Assam government claims that there are no illegal Bangladeshis in the state. Bordoloi gives a funny reason for such a huge jump in Bengali Muslim population in Assam: “Due to lower education and awareness level among them, they have more children,” he says. In 1997, then home minister Indrajit Gupta accepted in the Indian parliament that around 10 million illegal migrants from Bangladesh live in India. Most of them live in bordering districts of Assam, West Bengal and Tripura. A lot of them migrate to cities like Mumbai, New Delhi and Kolkata. Because India already has a Bengali Muslim population in West Bengal, it is difficult to detect them.

    There is also a flip side to the whole debate. Genuine Indian Bengali Muslims (and I know many and am friends with a few) face the brunt. Recently, a Bengali Muslim wrote to me how ashamed he is to be a citizen of Assam. “My family has been living on this land for generations. If the government is unable to detect illegal immigrants, why are we being targeted for that,” he asked me. I really didn’t have an answer. As a Bengali myself, I have a special emotional connect to the issue. I don’t know what the solution to this problem is. Right wing friends tell me that it is a conspiracy to Islamise Assam. They claim that illegal Bangladeshis are used to smuggle fake currency and weapons inside India. Many such theories sound just too far-fetched.

    In April last year, when I visited Dhubri on the India-Bangladesh border, the thing that struck me most was the poverty of the area. As someone in Guwahati told me then, the best solution to stop illegal immigration from Bangladesh is to ensure that India’s eastern neighbour grows as fast as India does. The day poverty is wiped out, perhaps, we shall see a reverse migration.

    Reading the Assam violence – The Express Tribune
    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

  12. #12
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Federal detectives probe Assam violence

    Federal detectives are due to visit violence-affected areas in India's Assam state, where 77 people have died.

    The Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) will be probing whether there was any "conspiracy" behind the violence.

    More than 300,000 people have fled their homes after fighting between indigenous Bodo tribes and Muslim settlers in Kokrajhar and Chirang.

    There has been tension between indigenous groups and Muslim Bengali migrants in Assam for many years.

    Federal Home Minister Sushilkumar Shinde said the CBI - India's leading investigation agency - will "take over certain cases [of violence] where conspiracy seems to be involved for investigation".

    Meanwhile senior Assam police official AP Rout told the state-run Doordarshan News that the situation in the violence-hit districts was "under control" and no fresh incidents had been reported.

    The army is conducting peace marches in the affected areas, he said.

    Police say that the clashes began last month when unidentified men killed four youths in Kokrajhar, an area dominated by the Bodo tribe.

    They say that armed Bodos attacked Muslims in retaliation, suspecting they were behind the killings.

    Soon afterwards unidentified groups set houses, schools and vehicles ablaze, police said, firing indiscriminately from automatic weapons in populated areas.
    BBC News - Federal detectives probe Assam violence
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix


  13. #13
    Senior Member KingKong's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    London
    Posts
    8,846
    Thanks
    5485
    Pakistan UK
    Protest against Assam riots turns violent in Mumbai

    MUMBAI: The protest that was staged by several Muslim organizations on Saturday to condemn the alleged attacks on Muslims in Myanmar and the riots in Assam turned violent. Police had to fire in the air to disperse protesters. Some vehicles were torched according to TV reports.

    Led by Raza Academy, an organization working to promote Islamic culture, the protest was supported by other organizations like Sunni Jamaitul Ulma and Jamate Raza-e-Mustafa. They also condemned the riots and violence in Assam.

    Sporting black badges, hundreds of members and activists of these organizations, earlier converged at the Azad Maidan and expressed concern over the massacre of the Muslim community.

    Maulana Syed Moinuddin Ashraf, president of Jamia Qadriya Ashrafiya, has urged the the central and state governments to intervene.

    "It is the responsibility of the Congress government to protect the Muslims, and for that matter each and every citizen," said the Maulana, who is also known as Moin Miyan.

    "With regards to the massacre in Myanmar, we understand it is an external problem and that certainly should be taken care of, but what is happening in Assam reflects on the state of affairs of the country," he added.

    "A large number of Muslims have been rendered homeless and are now living in camps," said Raza Academy chairman Saeed Noorie.

    Noorie said they have already written to the government of Myanmar, the United Nations, the International Human Rights Organization, Organization of Islamic Countries, President Pranab Mukherjee and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh to highlight the massacre of Muslims in Myanmar.

    Protest against Assam riots turns violent in Mumbai - The Times of India
    The Following User Says Thank You to KingKong For This Useful Post: Felix


  14. #14
    Member SamranALI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    421
    Thanks
    192
    Pakistan Pakistan
    but sad that our media give priority only to the bollywood news they dont highlight the issue which should be.
    The Following User Says Thank You to SamranALI For This Useful Post: Felix


  15. #15
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    10,678
    Thanks
    7341
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Nine injured in fresh violence in Kokrajhar

    Fresh violence gripped this trouble-torn Assam district leaving at least nine seriously injured while unrest spread to Kamrup (rural) which reported arson and police firing on Thursday.

    “Around 12.30 pm miscreants threw acid on an autorickshaw carrying members of a minority family at Gossaigaon town of Kokrajhar district seriously injuring nine travellers,” police said.
    The situation in the town was tense since the incident and the injured were taken to nearby Dhubri civil hospital for treatment, they said.

    Night curfew is on in the district from 9 pm, while day curfew had been relaxed.

    Violence spread to Kamrup (rural), which had been unaffected in the recent Bodo-minority immigrants violence, where a group of people torched several vehicles at Rangiya area during the day.

    A bus on way to Guwahati was set ablaze at Bhatkuchi, while several other vehicles stranded on the highway were damaged and a wooden bridge set afire at Kekahati by a mob protesting against the torching of a car at Gandhibari in neighbouring Baksa district on Wednesday night, police said.

    The driver of the car had gone missing since the incident.

    The mob, which blocked Udiana Chowk in Rangiya in protest since early morning, also tried to attack the vehicle of Rangiya SDO Barnali Deka, forcing the police to use tear gas and fire in the air to disperse them. Deka was, however, reported to be safe, the police said.

    The army staged a flag march at Rangiya area after the incidents, the sources said, adding top district officials are also camping there.

    The situation in Kamrup (Rural) was stated to be tense but under control.

    More than 77 people had lost their lives and scores were injured with nearly four lakh rendered homeless in one of the worst-ever clashes recently.
    Meanwhile, Assam government has intensified security in and around Guwahati railway station where two special trains carrying panic stricken students and professionals are expected to reach here tomorrow from Bangalore.

    “We do not want the situation to aggravate as the passengers will be thronged by the electronic media and any unwanted statement may have an impact over the volatile situation,” a senior police official said.

    The Hindu : News / National : Nine injured in fresh violence in Kokrajhar

    This is India --- the problems they have are infinite. People are simply being left by the government to pick on minorities --- truly as disgrace. What do you say Batman --- people safe in secular India??
    The Following User Says Thank You to Express For This Useful Post: Felix


  16. #16
    Senior Member Express's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    10,678
    Thanks
    7341
    Pakistan Pakistan
    Thousands continue to flee Indian cities



    The exodus of people from India's north-eastern states living in the southern city of Bangalore continues with more migrant workers fleeing.

    There are reports of people from the region fleeing the cities of Chennai (Madras) and Pune as well.

    PM Manmohan Singh has appealed for calm and said peace "must be maintained at any cost".

    Officials have blamed the exodus on "rumour mongering" linked to clashes in the north-eastern Assam state.

    More than 300,000 people fled after fighting between indigenous Bodo tribes and Muslim settlers in Assam.

    Fresh violence between the two sides was reported on Thursday when a mob set fire to a bus and a road bridge, reports say. At least nine people were reported to be injured in clashes.

    The main railway station in Bangalore was flooded with migrant workers from north-eastern states for a second successive day on Thursday to catch three special trains to the north-east.

    A senior Bangalore official told the BBC that nearly 15,000 people from the region had left the city since Wednesday, when the rumours broke out.

    'Nothing has happened'
    There are 250,000 people from the north-east living and working in Bangalore, which is often referred to as the Silicon Valley of India.

    Many of them are students, security guards and workers in the hospitality sector.

    A minister in the local government S Suresh Kumar told the Press Trust of India that the exodus was "not due to a threat factor, but due to the anxiety [of the people leaving] to be with their parents when Assam has been gripped by violence".


    The rumours of attacks have spread to neighbouring Chennai in Tamil Nadu state, and Pune in Maharashtra to the north-west, reports say.

    Workers and students from the north-east - mostly from Assam - living in Chennai arrived at the railway station to board to special trains to take them home, one report said.

    "Nothing has happened till now, but we are very sure something really bad is going to happen. Our Bangalore friends have said we have to leave," Bishnu, a migrant worker from Assam, told The Hindu newspaper.

    Reports of a similar exodus are being reported from western Pune city, where many north-east people working in the city are reported to have fled.

    The rumours of attacks have been spread through text messages and the social media. There have been a few reports of people being threatened to leave.

    "We must work together to ensure that all people from other states do not feel threatened by rumour mongering and text messages," PM Manmohan Singh said.

    Many young people from the restive north-east region have migrated to the cities of Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore in search of better jobs and education.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Express For This Useful Post: Felix


  17. #17
    Senior Moderator Superkaif's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Leeds, United Kingdom
    Posts
    14,888
    Thanks
    12096
    UK Pakistan
    Muslims face executions in India's Assam region

    Members of the outlawed National Democratic Front of Bodoland have been killing Muslims in India's Assam district, at a time when Muslims are facing similar violent demises in neighboring Myanmar. Muslims of Bengali origin have been killed in rioting after a free-for-all in the four districts of western Assam. The Indian government has called out the army, issuing shoot-at-sight orders to control the ongoing violence.

    LOS ANGELES, CA (Catholic Online): Many are still missing and nearly 400,000 people are in makeshift camps after being displaced by the July riots.

    Bodo separatist rebels have attacked Bengali Muslims over the past several years, along with other non-Bodo minorities since 1992. Their goal is to create a Bodo majority in their perceived ethnic homeland. Hundreds have been killed, the worst violence reported in 1996-97, when about a quarter of a million people were displaced.

    The riots in India's northeast follow the same pattern as violence against Muslim Rohingya in neighboring Myanmar.

    Those fleeing the violence have beseeched rulers to let them stay in their adopted homelands. Sixty-three-year-old Rehana Bibi begged India's ruling Congress Chief Sonia Gandhi to let her and others like her remain in refugee camps.

    "We prefer to stay in these government-aided camps though we don't get enough to eat or space to sleep. But that is better than constantly living with the threat of death," Rehana told Gandhi.

    Rehana was later joined by scores of Muslim women, from teenagers to the elderly, who pleaded with Gandhi not to be forced to go back to their native villages.

    "Violence is still continuing in our area. We are getting to know of deaths and attacks. The government should please allow us to stay here until we feel it is safe to go back home," said Sultana, another Muslim woman.

    Many remain missing and nearly 400,000 people are in makeshift camps after being displaced by the July riots.

    More than 2,500 Muslims were killed in ethnic riots that erupted during a six-year long campaign by Assamese groups (1979-1985). The worst carnage took place at Nellie in February 1983, when 1,600 Muslims were killed in two days of bloodbaths unleashed by Lalung tribesmen.

    India's situation bears parallels to Myanmar's Rakhine province, where Rohingya Muslims, sometimes called "Bengalis" in that country, have suffered heavy casualties in fights with Buddhist Rakhines. Most of those killed have been Rohingyas, although some Rakhines are also among the dead.

    "And like in Myanmar, so in Assam, nativist passion runs high against these Muslims. They are demonized and held responsible for all the woes faced by the indigenous peoples," Samir Das, an author who has written on Assam says. "They are seen as encroachers on indigenous lands and resources."

    However, Rohingya say they are indigenous to Myanmar's Rakhine province (previously Arakans), but many Burmese, including President Thein Sein, believe they are settlers from what is now the Chittagong region of Bangladesh, and say they should be taken out.

    The Muslims of Bengali origin in Assam admit they originally hail from what was eastern Bengal and is now Bangladesh. Local Assamese and tribal groups, however, allege that illegal migration from Bangladesh continues unabated.

    "People from what is now Bangladesh migrate to all over the world and they have been moving into Assam or other parts of northeast India since the days of the British. But what the locals are worried about are the growing numbers of the descendants of these Bengali Muslim settlers and their rising influence in the state's agrarian economy and politics," Assam political analyst Nani Gopal Mahanta says.
    The Following User Says Thank You to Superkaif For This Useful Post: Felix


  18. #18
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan
    One killed in Chirang, Gogoi holds all-party meeting

    GUWAHATI: Violence rocked Bodoland again on Friday when a man belonging to the minority community was shot dead by unidentified gunmen at Salekati in Chirang district at 7.30 pm, when curfew was relaxed.

    The deceased has been identified as Khasem Ali, who was shot in front his pharmacy. Police recovered empty shells of 9mm pistol from the spot and haven't ruled out the involvement of militants in the attack.

    Chief minister Tarun Gogoi appealed to all political parties to ensure ceasefire "till the dust settles down".

    After a lull of 10 days, violence erupted in new areas in Baksa, Nalbari and Kamrup (rural) district on Thursday. This was in connection with the clashes that broke out on July 20 between Bodos and Bengali-speaking Muslims in lower Assam. The violence in Kokrajhar was brought under control after the army was deployed on July 25. Violence was again reported on August 6 in Chirang after which the situation was normal.

    Assam police IG (law and order), L R Bishnoi, said curfew in Rangiya in Kamrup (rural) has been relaxed. "No incident of fresh violence has been reported. The situation is under control," he said, adding that the army and police are keeping strict vigil.

    Police clarified that they had fired tear-gas shells and rubber pellets to disperse the unruly mob that had gheraoed Tamulpur police station in protest against the detention of 65 people in connection with the burning of a car at Kaurbaha on Thursday.

    At an all-party meeting convened by Gogoi and attended by representatives of the Congress, AIUDF, BJP, AGP, Trinamool Congress, NCP, BPF, CPI, CPI(M) and SUCI, the CM appealed to all political parties to work for the restoration of peace and harmony in Assam. He also asked them to exercise restraint and not to make provocative statements that may aggravate the crisis.

    "It's not the time to indulge in mud-slinging to gain political mileage. We have to restrain ourselves for at least two-three months till the dust settles down," he said.

    "Our priority is to restore peace and rehabilitate the affected people. We have to remove fear from their minds and ensure a sense of security so that they can return to their homes," he said.

    Gogoi said the government is ensuring there is no dearth of relief material in camps. "By and large, people are getting relief material. We have taken steps to decongest overcrowded camps to overcome problems of sanitation."

    Gogoi apprised party representatives at the meeting about his telephonic talk with the Union home minister, chief ministers of Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh, urging them to take up measures to instill confidence among migrants. "I must appreciate the steps taken by my counterparts. We have to create a congenial atmosphere for them to go back soon," he said.

    The chief minister pointed out that many burning problems will be solved once NRC is upgraded. "I know the process is time consuming, but we have to complete it," he added.
    One killed in Chirang, Gogoi holds all-party meeting - The Times of India
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix


  19. #19
    Forum Administrator bilalhaider's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    6,605
    Thanks
    4000
    Pakistan Pakistan
    2 hurt in protest against killing

    DHUBRI, Aug 18 – Two persons, including a child, were injured when activists of two students’ outfits threw stones at a public bus during protest and road blockade on the National Highway 31 in Dhubri district today, reports PTI.

    Hundreds of activists of the All Assam Minority Students’ Union (AAMSU) and All Bodoland Minority Students’ Union (ABMSU) gathered at the spot since morning to protest the killing of an ABMSU leader at Salakati along Kokrajhar-Chirang border.

    They were holding the protest with the body of the leader who was killed by unidentified gunmen outside his pharmacy last night.

    Police rushed to the spot to disperse the protesters. When the agitators refused to lift the blockade, police resorted to lathicharge.

    The protesters also turned violent and threw stones at a bus on its way from Dhubri to Barpeta. The driver of the bus and a child sustained mild injuries when they were hit by stones. Both were administered first-aid.

    The situation in the area is now stable and vehicles have started plying in the NH-31.
    The Assam Tribune Online
    The Following User Says Thank You to bilalhaider For This Useful Post: Felix


  20. #20
    Junior Member Kesang's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    North-east
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    10
    India India
    North-east Indian migrants returning to Bangalore

    Hundreds of people from north-east India, who had fled the southern city of Bangalore fearing reprisal attacks in recentdays, have started returning.
    Officials say the situation in the city and otherparts of Karnataka state is now normal.
    They blamed the exodus of more than 20,000people on "rumours" linked to clashes in north-eastern Assam state.
    After the Assam violence, threatening messages were sent to migrant workers and students from the north-east.
    Panic set in and people began fleeing the south and west after a Tibetan was knifed by an unidentified attacker in the city of Mysore. Police say they believe the attackers mistook him to be from Assam.
    "They are all slowly coming back. Bangalore isnormal. We have taken all measures to maintain peace," additional commissioner of police Sunil Kumar told the BBC.
    He said 22 people had been arrested for"rumour-mongering, assaulting and threatening" students from the north-east and riot police have been deployed in sensitive areas of the city where north-easterners live.
    North-eastern residents of Bangalore said thestate government's confidence building measures, including holding peace meetings with Muslim leaders, had helped maintain peace.
    At least 87 people died in fighting between indigenous Bodo tribes and Muslim settlers inAssam in recent months.

    BBC News - North-east Indian migrants returning to Bangalore
    The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Kesang For This Useful Post: Aryan_B,Pickwickian


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Syrian Conflict
    By Lord Of The Ring in forum World Affairs
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 18th July 2012, 18:08
  2. Pregnant Assam MLA beaten up by mob for converting to Islam!!!
    By Lord Of The Ring in forum World Affairs
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 3rd July 2012, 19:29

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Join us on twitter Follow us on twitter