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Thread: Pakistan - Good Old Days

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  1. #1
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    Cool Pakistan - Good Old Days

    Old Days of Pakistan- Little Memory left and seem alien to us.


    Che in Karachi: Yes, that’s the great Marxist revolutionary and legend, Che Ernesto Guevara, standing along side Pakistan’s first military dictator, Ayub Khan.


    PIA press ad, 1965: This 1965 PIA ad (published in Dawn) bares claims that one can’t even imagine PIA to make in this day and age.


    House full: Pakistani film industry and cinemas began experiencing a creative and financial peak in the late 1960s; a high that would last till about 1979, before starting to patter out in the 1980s and hitting rock bottom a decade later.


    Moonwalkers in Karachi, 1973: How many of you know or remember that the entire crew of NASA’s Apollo 17 flight to the moon visited Pakistan? In July 1973, astronauts of the United State’s last mission to the moon arrived in Karachi.
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    At the art of it all: This 1975 photograph shows a group of some of Pakistan’s famous painters and sculptors with a visiting British artist at the Karachi Arts Council. Check out the flares, the sideburns and all. And they’re smoking inside the building. Awesome.


    Damned greatness: A 1976 photo of Pakistan’s Nobel Prize winning scientist, Dr. Abdus Salam (right), with a colleague at a summer college held at Pakistan’s scenic Nathiyagali resort.

    Considered to be one of the greatest minds produced by Pakistan, Dr. Salam, a devout member of the Ahmadi community, was associated with various scientific and developmental projects undertaken by the government from the 1950s till 1974.

    He quit and left Pakistan in protest after the Ahmadis were declared as non-Muslim (in the 1973 Constitution).

    However, he kept returning to the country on the invitation of friends, but he never reconciled with those who’d pushed to declare his community a non-Muslim minority in the country of his birth and work.


    Hippie invasion: Cover of the soundtrack album (LP) of 1974 box-office hit, Miss Hippie. The film depicted the ‘effect hippie lifestyle and fashion were having on Pakistani youth.’ (sic)


    A 1964 PIA press ad featuring famous Hollywood comedian and actor Bob Hope.

    PIA was one of the first airlines in the world to introduce in-flight entertainment. It regularly featured in all the prestigious top-10-airline lists for over 20 years, before dropping out in the mid-1980s.
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    Army troops patrol the streets opposite Club Road and near PIDC building in Karachi, during the anti-Ayub Khan protest movement in 1969.


    Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) chairman Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, addresses a rally at Muhammad Ali Jinnah’s mausoleum in Karachi in 1969. (Photo courtesy of eBay.)

    The rally was held immediately after a protest movement led by leftist students; labour and journalist unions; political parties, including PPP and the National Awami Party (NAP), had forced Pakistan’s first military dictator Ayub Khan, to resign.

    Construction of the mausoleum began in the early 1960s and was still underway when the rally was held. Wooden ladders and planks being used for construction purposes were acrobatically utilised by the crowd to gain vantage viewing points on the day of the rally.


    Famous Hollywood stars Ava Gardner and Stewart Granger arrive at Lahore Airport, 1954. The actors arrived in Lahore with a full filming crew to shoot a major portion of the film ‘Bhowani Junction.’


    Ava Gardner shooting a scene at the Lahore Railway Station in 1954.
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    American Embassy building under construction in Karachi, 1957. (Photo courtesy of eBay.)

    Completed in the late 1950s, the building became an iconic structure on Karachi’s Abdullah Haroon Road.

    Apart from having a busy visa section, it also housed a state-of-the-art projection hall and a widespread library, which was used by generations of Karachi’s school and college students before it was closed down in the late 1990s.

    Easy to access across the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s – the building was gradually barricaded and heavily fortified after the tragic September 11 episode in 2001. The visa section was moved to Islamabad, before returning to Karachi in 2012 (in a different building and compound).

    This building faced at least four terrorist attacks between 2002 and 2006 and survived them all.

    Though the US consulate has now moved to a different location in Karachi, the building still stands.


    American tourists enjoy a camel ride at Karachi’s Clifton beach in 1960. [Video grab from a 1960 tourism promotional film made by Pan Am]

    A series of apartment blocks, bungalows, fast-food joints and restaurants have sprung up in the area today – but no tourists, especially not the bikini-wearing kind.


    Former Pakistani Test batsman Sadiq Muhammad (left) and former Pakistan cricket captain, Mushtaq Muhammad, share a beer in Sydney in January, 1977.

    The picture was taken inside the players’ dressing room at the Sydney Cricket Ground after Pakistan defeated a strong Australian Test side. This was Pakistan’s first Test victory against Australia in Australia. With the victory, Pakistan squared the series 1-1 after being one down in the series. Seen in the background is a shirtless Imran Khan who took 12 wickets in the match.


    Pakistan cricket team’s famous pace duo, Imran Khan and Sarfraz Nawaz, at a nightclub in Melbourne in 1981.

    The picture was taken during Pakistan team’s 1981 tour of Australia. Architects of various wins by the Pakistan team in the 1970s and early 1980s, Imran and Sarfraz who were both best friends but had a major falling out as politicians in the 1990s.

    Sarfraz, a long-time Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) supporter, joined the PPP after retirement (in 1988) whereas Khan formed his own party (1996). Nawaz changed allegiances last year, when he switched to the Muttahida Qaumi Movement (MQM).
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    Famous Hollywood stars, Stewart Granger and Ava Gardner, wave to fans on their arrival at Lahore Airport (1955). They were in Lahore to shoot scenes for the film ‘Bhowani Junction.’


    A scene from ‘Bhowani Junction’ being shot outside a Lahore police station.


    Western tourists sunbathing on a Karachi beach (early 1960s).


    A group of American tourists on a ‘crabbing trip’ in Karachi. ‘Crabbing’ (catching crabs) was a thriving tourist activity in Karachi where tourists would rent boats from the coastal Kimari area of the city and ‘go crabbing.’ The boats mostly belonged to men belonging to the ‘Afro-Pakistani’ community in Karachi and some of them had small barbecue kitchens and bars fitted in the boats. The boats are still there, but not the tourists.
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    These beautiful posts bringing back some beautiful memories --- thanking you very much Raptor sahib. Great posting yaar.
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    The Queen of England (Elizabeth II) meeting a welcoming committee during her visit to Karachi in 1961. She also toured many parts of the city with the then ruler of Pakistan, Field Martial Ayub Khan in an open-top limousine.


    Militant Bengali nationalists (Mukti Bhaini) aim at West Pakistan troops during the 1971 Civil War between West Pakistani military and East Pakistan nationalists. The Bengali nationalists picked up arms against the Pakistan military after accusing it of committing large scale massacres against Bengalis. Backed by India, the rebels defeated the West Pakistan military and East Pakistan became Bangladesh.


    A group of hippies (British, French and American) wait for a bus in Lahore (1972). Pakistan was an important destination on what was called the ‘Hippie Trail.’

    The trail was used by thousands of young European and American backpackers between the late 1960s and 1979. It was an overland route that began in Turkey, ran through Iran, curved into Afghanistan and Pakistan and then from India ended in Nepal.

    A huge tourist industry sprang up in these countries to accommodate the backpackers. In Pakistan, the travelers entered Peshawar (from Jalalabad in Afghanistan). From Peshawar they went to Lahore. Some took a bus into India while others visited Karachi and Swat before returning to Lahore and crossed into India.


    A tourism bus operated by Pakistan’s Ministry of Tourism taking western tourists on a sight-seeing ride in Karachi (1974). Such buses were decorated keeping in mind the time’s ‘hippie aesthetics.’
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    A classic early 1970s hand-painted billboard of actor and martial arts expert, Bruce Lee.

    This particular billboard was painted in Lahore and was used to advertise Lee’s 1973 blockbuster ‘Enter the Dragon.’ Just like in the West, Lee had become an icon and hugely popular with action film enthusiasts in Pakistan as well. His films did roaring business in cinemas and popularised the martial arts in Pakistan. Lee died a sudden death in 1973.


    A rare photo showing the Pakistan hockey team on its way to win the 1971 Hockey World Cup held in Barcelona, Spain. It defeated the host country in the finals.


    Wife of the Shah of Iran arrives at the Quetta Airport (1973). She was greeted by the then Balochistan governor, Mir Ghaos Baksh Beznjo, who belonged to the left-wing National Awami Party (NAP) that headed the government in Balochistan (after the 1970 election).

    Ironically, Bezenjo and the NAP government in the province were dismissed by the Z A. Bhutto regime when the Shah of Iran warned Pakistan that NAP was instigating Baloch nationalist rebellion in the Iranian part of Balochistan.


    A 21-year-old Benazir Bhutto sitting on the porch of her father Z A. Bhutto’s house in Karachi (1974). Benazir would go on to lead her father’s Pakistan Peoples Party (PPP) after he was hanged to death by General Ziaul Haq in April 1979.

    In 1990s she was twice elected as Pakistan’s prime minister before tragically losing her life at the hands of Islamic militants in December 2007.
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    Cover of the May 1972 issue of The Herald. Herald (a monthly published by the Dawn Group) was initially a magazine focusing on the changing fashion, political and social trends of the urban Pakistani youth. However, from 1980 onwards it became more political in its content.


    A 1973 issue of The Herald with a cover story on the then vibrant social scene of Karachi.


    A 1972 Runa Laila song (performed on Pakistan’s state-owned TV channel, PTV) that added the ‘hippie chic’ in modern Pakistani music.


    A 1976 photo showing famous Pakistani pop star, Alamgir, sharing a joke with popular TV actor and comedian, late Moin Akhtar. The photo was taken just before an Alamgir concert in Karachi that was hosted by Moin.


    Pakistani TV actors, Subhani Bhai Yunus, Shakeel and RJ on the set of a PTV play (1975). Yunus was also an accomplished stage actor, while Shakeel (centre) had risen to become a star on TV in the 1970s.
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    American tourists travelling to Lahore from Karachi on a Pakistan Railways train (1976). -Photo courtesy Murad Husain and Bina Ahmed.


    A group of college girls relaxing outside their college in Karachi (1976).


    Rare footage of the famous Pakistan vs. India Test match played at the Karachi Stadium in 1978. Petering out as a dull draw, the match suddenly came alive when the Pakistan team captain, Mushtaq Muhammad, decided to chase the then impossible target of 160 plus runs in less than 25 overs in the last session of the match.

    A 21-year-old Javed Miandad and Vice Captain, Asif Iqbal, were sent in as openers. After an incredible display of running between the wickets, Pakistan still required more than 8 runs an over when Iqbal got out.

    Mushtaq sent in the young Imran Khan (then 26) to lift the scoring rate. After surviving a run-out scare, Khan tore into the Indian bowling attack by smashing two towering sixes and a four to take Pakistan home to victory.


    DAWN headline about the military take-over of General Ziaul Haq (July 1977). The elections did not take place ‘next October.’ Zia ruled for 11 years. Pakistan was never the same again.
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    Is Pakistan becoming Ayotallah State?

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    After seeing those pictures...I feel like a toddler who lost his favorite toy ! What the heck did you guys of the 50s, the 60s and even the 70s, did that you left me a Talibanized or nearly Talibanized Pakistan in the late 80s and early 90s when we were born !
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    really nice pictures, so much has changed since those days, from these picture it looks like pakistan had indeed so much going for it, so much potential who could have predcited the changes from that time..
    "PIA was one of the first airlines in the world to introduce in-flight entertainment. It regularly featured in all the prestigious top-10-airline lists for over 20 years, before dropping out in the mid-1980s"
    And look at the state of it now...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Armstrong View Post
    After seeing those pictures...I feel like a toddler who lost his favorite toy ! What the heck did you guys of the 50s, the 60s and even the 70s, did that you left me a Talibanized or nearly Talibanized Pakistan in the late 80s and early 90s when we were born !
    I know what you mean mate...but sometimes you have to lose something to learn to appreciate. Inshallah better days are ahead and our youth will produce better leaders and create better opportunities for our beloved country to rise again...

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    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by Spring View Post
    really nice pictures, so much has changed since those days, from these picture it looks like pakistan had indeed so much going for it, so much potential who could have predcited the changes from that time..
    "PIA was one of the first airlines in the world to introduce in-flight entertainment. It regularly featured in all the prestigious top-10-airline lists for over 20 years, before dropping out in the mid-1980s"
    And look at the state of it now...
    PIA was the pride of Pakistan and many foreign carriers used to envy her.
    Here are few historic facts about PIA in her good days..

    -

    The first airline from an Asian land country and the first airline from a Muslim country to fly the Super Constellation.
    - The first Asian airline to operate a jet aircraft.
    - The first Asian airline to be granted maintenance approval by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Air Registration Board, predecessor of the British Civil Aviation Authority (CAA).
    - The first non-communist airline to fly to the People's Republic of China, and to operate a service between Asia and Europe via Moscow.
    - The first airline in Asia to induct the new technology Boeing 737-300 aircraft.
    - An IBM 1401, the first computer in Pakistan, was installed in PIA.
    - The first airline to introduce a second route to People's Republic of China over the mighty Karakoram mountains.
    - The first airline to show in-flight movies on international routes.
    - PIA set up Pakistan's first planetarium at Karachi.
    - The first airline in South Asia to introduce auto-ticketing facility.
    - The first airline in the world to fly to Tashkent, capital of the newly independent state of Uzbekistan.
    - First airline in the world to start Air Safari with jet aircraft.
    - First Asian airline to start flights to Oslo, the beautiful capital city of Norway.
    - First airline in the world to induct Boeing 777-200LR, the world's longest range commercial airliner.
    - First airline in South Asia to offer the facility of seat reservation through mobile phone.
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    Great spirits have always found violent opposition from mediocre minds. - Albert Einstein

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    Pakistan of YesterYears

    This thread is a dedicated thread for pictures and other multimedia related to Pakistan in the 'good ol days'.

    Request mods to make this a sticky, I'll try my best to keep updating this.

    Most of this will be taken from the dawn edition called 'Also Pakistan'.

    Feel free to post with me if you wish. Anyway, enjoy...




    Che in Karachi:Yes, that’s the great Marxist revolutionary and legend, Che Ernesto Guevara, standing along side Pakistan’s first military dictator, Ayub Khan.

    Guevara stayed for a short while in Karachi during his whirlwind tour of Arab and third world countries (in 1959). He again visited Karachi in 1965 and that is when the above photograph was believed to have been taken (inside the VIP lounge of the Karachi Airport).

    It is interesting to see Che standing with Ayub Khan whose military coup (in 1958) was not only backed by the US, but was also highly repressive of leftist forces in Pakistan.

    The irony is that the widespread leftist uprising in Pakistan in the late 1960s that helped topple the Ayub dictatorship was mainly led by leftist students many of whose icon and hero was, yup, one named Che Ernesto Guevara!



    PIA press ad, 1965: This 1965 PIA ad (published in Dawn) bares claims that one can’t even imagine PIA to make in this day and age.

    Pakistan’s national carrier has been crumbling for the last many years and today stands on the verge of bankruptcy. And yet, back in the 1960s and early 1970s, PIA stood strong and proud, awarded on multiple occasions and being a constant on the list of top ten airlines of the world!

    When this ad appeared in print, PIA was enjoying rapid growth within and outside Pakistan. It had already been noted for having ‘the most stylishly dressed air hostesses’, great service, a widespread route and, ahem, ‘having a generous and tasteful selection of wines, whiskeys and beers’ on offer.’*

    *Serving alcoholic drinks on PIA was banned in April 1977.



    House full: Pakistani film industry and cinemas began experiencing a creative and financial peak in the late 1960s; a high that would last till about 1979, before starting to patter out in the 1980s and hitting rock bottom a decade later.

    There were a number of reasons for the rapid fall of the industry and the consequential closing down of numerous cinemas.

    Two of the leading reasons were the brutal censorship policies of the reactionary Ziaul Haq dictatorship in the 1980s, and the arrival of the VCR.

    As Zia’s so-called ‘Islamisation’ process began stuffing public space and collective socialising spots with moral policing and restrictions, the people took their entertainment indoors.

    Cinemas were hit the worst by this as not only the ‘respectable’ audiences stopped frequenting cinemas; the Pakistani film industry too began to fall apart.

    ‘Illegal’ video shops renting Indian films and porn (allowed to openly operate after bribing the police) sprang up and cinemas began to be torn down by their owners and turned into gaudy shopping malls.

    For example, in Sindh alone there were over 600 cinemas between 1969 and 1980, but only a few hundred remained by 1985.

    Similarly, the Pakistani film industry used to generate an average of 20 Urdu films a year in the 1970s, but by the late 1980s, it was struggling to come out with even five a year.

    The above photo was taken in 1969 outside Karachi’s famous Nishat Cinema. It was also one of the first cinemas to introduce in-house air-conditioning in cinemas in Pakistan. The picture shows a crowd of cine-goers gathered outside the already packed cinema waiting their turn to see the premiere of a Pakistani war flick, ‘Qasam uss waqt ki.’

    Nishat survived the thorny Zia years, the VCR invasion and the local film industry’s collapse.

    In fact Nishat still stands, reeking out a survival by running latest Indian and Hollywood films.



    Taliban, who? No, this is not an image from a bygone hippie flick. It is a picture of real hippies enjoying a few puffs of hashish on the roof of a cheap hotel in Peshawar in 1972. Yes, Peshawar.

    Pakistan was an important destination that lay on what was called the ‘hippie trail’ – an overland route taken by young western and American bag-packers between 1967 and 1979 and that ran from Turkey, across Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India, usually ending in Nepal.

    Numerous low-budget hotels and a thriving tourist industry sprang up (in Peshawar, Lahore and Karachi) to accommodate these travellers.

    The hippie trail began eroding after the 1977 military coup in Pakistan, the 1979 Islamic Revolution in Iran and the beginning of the Afghan civil war (in 1979).



    Tequila twist! One of the rare photographs available of Karachi’s famous nightclub scene of the late 1960s and 1970s.

    Live music, great food, lots of booze and dancing were the hallmarks of the scene. Shown here is a club band playing to a happy audience at a ‘mid-range’ nightclub in Karachi (in 1972).

    According to former nightclub owner and entrepreneur, Tony Tufail, ‘Karachi would have gone on to become what Dubai later became if not for the ban.’*

    *Nightclubs were closed down in April 1977.



    Moonwalkers in Karachi, 1973: How many of you know or remember that the entire crew of NASA’s Apollo 17 flight to the moon visited Pakistan? In July 1973, astronauts of the United State’s last mission to the moon arrived in Karachi.

    Their visit was widely covered by the press and Pakistan Television (PTV). The astronauts were also honoured by a ‘welcome motorcade procession’ that travelled from Clifton Road till Tower area.

    The photograph shows the motorcade reaching the Saddar area that was decorated with Pakistani, American and PPP flags and colourful banners.

    Some of the astronauts travelled in an open truck (see picture). The truck also carries a banner that reads (in Urdu): ‘Welcome to the Apollo 17 astronauts.’

    Resource: US Consulate General-Pakistan.
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    Re: Pakistan of YesterYears



    Islamabad - Early 60's.

    Former President Ayub taking a look on the land which was to be developed as Capital City!
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    Re: Pakistan of YesterYears



    Lux's Advertisement in the 'Black & White Golden Era'

    Starring Sabiha Khanum - the popular actress of 50's was the 1st female brand ambassador of Lux Soap which has been later endorsed by top film personalities like Babra Sharif, Reema, Meera etc



    Zia Mohiuddin, The Pakistani legendry actor seen here in a British TV series, ‘The Adventures of Sir Francis Drake’ (1962).

    In Pakistan, Zia became hugely popular with a stage show [for Pakistan Television [PTV], the ‘Zia Mohiuddin Show’ (1970-72).

    He went on to act in various British and American TV series and films and then once again found fame in Pakistan as a brilliant reciter of the poetry of Faiz Ahmed Faiz and Mirza Ghalib.
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    Re: Pakistan of YesterYears



    1947 - Lahore Railway Station!
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    Re: Pakistan of YesterYears



    The Queen of England [Elizabeth II] meeting a welcoming committee during her visit to Karachi in 1961. She also toured many parts of the city with the then ruler of Pakistan, Field Martial Ayub Khan in an open-top limousine.
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