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Thread: Indian Naval Strength & Assets.

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  1. #41
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    Though old, but a very informative Video.....

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  2. #42
    Senior Member ManojKumar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by contract killer View Post
    Currently Indian Navy operates 66 Chetaks.
    Thanks and btw great thread
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  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by ManojKumar View Post
    Thanks and btw great thread
    Thanks Bro!

  4. #44
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    India test-fires manoeuvrable version of BRAHMOS

    VISAKHAPATNAM (BNS): Today at 0930 hrs BRAHMOS supersonic cruise missile was successfully flight tested from Indian Naval Warship in vertical launch configuration off Vizag coast in the Bay of Bengal to a full range of 290 kms.

    The missile blasted off in a pre-designated war scenario taking a "double-manoeuvre in S-form" hitting the designated target ship just one meter above water line. The sheer velocity and power of hit made the missile rip through the ship's hull.

    This is the 34th launch of BRAHMOS which just followed the successful October launch from INS Teg in the Arabian Sea.

    The BRAHMOS missile system was inducted into the Indian Navy in 2005 when it began arming the Rajput-class guided missile destroyers and inducted subsequently in many warships. For Indian Navy, BRAHMOS is the main attack weapon with high-precision, devastating power and supersonic speed without any competitor.

    BRAHMOS is already inducted into the Indian Army in two regiments and is the mainstay of the artillery. The Indian Army is the only armed force in the world to have land-attack supersonic cruise missile capability.

    The missile is known for its fastest reaction time from cold stage to launch readiness within few minutes and once the target data is acquired and transmitted to the onboard computer, including expected countermeasures in its path, the most optimal trajectory is given to the commander by the Fire Control system of the weapon complex.

    Once selected, the missile takes off in the designated path with high accuracy which is constantly updated by the Satellite Navigation System.

    BRAHMOS is capable of acquiring data not only from the American GPS but also from Russian GLONASS system which ensures double redundancy. In the last stage the seeker takes over and the target is located with accuracy of few meters which guarantees no chances of survival for the target. This has been proved once again today with bull's eye accuracy.

    Defence Minister Shri A. K. Antony congratulated the Ship commander, Indian Navy and the BrahMos team for this excellent demonstration of capabilities, which has ensured that no adversary can approach Indian waters with wrong intentions.

    India test-fires manoeuvrable version of BRAHMOS - Brahmand.com
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  5. #45
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    Indian Navy receives warship INS Saryu from GSL

    NEW DELHI (PTI): The indigenously designed new 105 metre-class warship, INS Saryu was on Friday handed over to the Indian Navy by the Goa Shipyards Limited (GSL).

    INS Saryu would be the largest offshore patrol vessel to be operated by the force.

    "The warship was handed over by GSL Chairman Rear Admiral (Retd) Vineet Bakhshi to Commander Amanpreet Singh-- the CO-designate of INS Saryu in a simple ceremony in Goa," the shipyard said in a release.

    The Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) will help meet the increasing requirement of the Navy for undertaking ocean surveillance and surface warfare operations in order to prevent infiltration and transgression of maritime sovereignty, it said.

    The warship was one of the vessels ordered by the Defence Ministry after the 26/11 attack in Mumbai in 2008.

    This vessel is suitable for monitoring sea lines of communication, defence of offshore oil installations and other critical offshore national assets, the release said.

    It can also be deployed for escorting high value ships and fleet-support operations, it said.

    Designed and built by GSL, the warship is the culmination of many years of inhouse design development and ship build techniques.

    Indian Navy receives warship INS Saryu from GSL - Brahmand.com

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  6. #46
    Professionals keysersoze's Avatar
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    Antony wants indigenous aircraft carrier delivered soon

    Cut up over long delay in the construction schedule of India’s first indigenous aircraft carrier (IAC), being built in his home State of Kerala at the Cochin Shipyard Limited (CSL), Defence Minister A. K. Antony on Tuesday asked all the stakeholders to work together and make efforts for an early delivery of the warship.

    Upset over frequent delays on one account or the other, Mr. Antony told a high-level review meeting in New Delhi that henceforth accountability would be fixed for any further slippages in the ambitious national project. “We cannot go one hearing about excuses. Henceforth accountability will be fixed in case of slippages in the construction of the warship which is a national project,” he said.

    Mr. Antony’s observations came at a meeting held at the Defence Ministry to review the progress of the construction of the IAC at Cochin Shipyard. The meeting was attended by the Minister of State in Defence Ministry Jitendra Singh, Navy Chief Admiral D.K. Joshi, Defence Secretary Shashikant Sharma and senior officials of the CSL.

    The 40,000-tonne IAC was to be inducted into the Navy by 2014-15 but the delay will push back the proposed induction to 2018 as well as escalating the total cost of the project. The meeting noted that most of the teething problems of the project have been sorted out. The supply of two gear boxes of the warship has also been arranged, the meeting was informed.

    Mr. Antony said an Empowered Committee has been formed under the Defence Secretary which would constantly monitor the progress in the IAC. The Minister also asked the CSL to give a firm date of induction of the carrier at the earliest.

    Sources in the ministry said that a proposal would be sent to the Finance Ministry and the Cabinet Committee on Security (CCS) for improving the flow of funds for the project launched in 2009. Mr. Antony had told Parliament in August that the complexity of the project and it being the first ship of its kind being built in India, has led to timelines being extended.

    The IAC is to be christened INS Vikrant after the country's first aircraft carrier which was decommissioned in 1997. With the sole aircraft carrier INS Viraat being stationed in Kochi for a check and regular maintenance and delivery of INS Vikramaditya being delayed further by a year, Indian Navy’s plans to have two operational aircraft carriers has taken a hit. India also has a 65,000-tonne IAC-II on the drawing board but the delay in IAC-I have derailed it.
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  7. #47
    Member Jade's Avatar
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    Thanks CK. Excellent thread
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  8. #48
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jade View Post
    Thanks CK. Excellent thread
    You are welcome bro!

  9. #49
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    WEAPON SYSTEM OF INDIAN NAVY..............


    SUBMARINE LAUNCHED MISSILES........

    Agni III or K4..
    Range = 3500 kms.


    K15 Sagarika..
    Range = 700 to 1900 kms.

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  10. #50
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    SHIP LAUNCHED BALLISTIC MISSILE..........

    Dhanush...
    Range= 600 kms


  11. #51
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    INS Saryu commissioned near Andaman and Nicobar Islands

    Last Updated: Monday, January 21, 2013, 15:03

    Panaji: The Indian Navy on Monday commissioned its largest off shore patrol vessel INS Saryu for maritime surveillance around Andaman and Nicobar Islands.

    Built at Goa Shipyard Limited, the 105-meter vessel is the first of the four new class naval off shore patrol vessels (NOPVs) that would be commissioned by the Indian Navy over next one-and-half year.

    "The ship will help the Navy to discharge its duty on the eastern coast. It will patrol the exclusive economic zone around the islands as it has a capacity to be off shore for a month on its own," Air Marshal PK Roy, the Commander in Chief of Andaman and Nicobar Command of Indian Navy, told a news agency.

    Air Marshal Roy commissioned the ship in Vasco town near here today in presence of senior naval officials.

    "This is an important step towards security of our maritime assets based near Andaman and Nicobar Islands," he said, adding that the security of few of the islands which are uninhabited is crucial.

    "There are 500 islands of which many are not inhabited," he said, adding that the area around Andaman and Nicobar Islands is strategic from naval point of view.

    Indian Navy officials said INS Saryu will also be important to provide secured environment for oil installations off Andaman and Nicobar coast.

    "The vessel can also be deployed for escorting high value ships and fleet support operations," a senior official added.

    "The ship is the Indian Navy's largest off shore patrol vessel, the first in its class," said Rear Admiral (Retd) Vineet Bakhshi, the chairman and managing director of Goa Shipyard Limited.

    The second ship in this class would be delivered by May this year and the rest two ships within an interval of six months each thereafter, he added.

    INS Saryu commissioned near Andaman and Nicobar Islands
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  12. #52
    Member Skull and Bones's Avatar
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    It looks awesome.

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  13. #53
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    From another angle..........
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  14. #54
    Member Skull and Bones's Avatar
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    Pride of Indian Navy.

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  15. #55
    Member Skull and Bones's Avatar
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    INS Tarkash.

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  16. #56
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    Thanks Bro!! Bring in more.

  17. #57
    Member Skull and Bones's Avatar
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    INS Makar, survey vessel of IN. Wish they develop future frigates based on this design.

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  18. #58
    Member Skull and Bones's Avatar
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    Shinmaywa US-2 seems to be the favorite for Indian navy for the tender of 9 amphibious aircraft.



    Competitors include.

    Beriev 200



    Bombardier 415.

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  19. #59
    Elite Member contract killer's Avatar
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    Right choice...

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  20. #60
    Senior Member Dash's Avatar
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    Pakistan Pakistan
    Greater Indian Ocean: A Peaceful Geo-Political Pivot Or A Contentious Source Of Hedging
    By: Khan A. Sufyan
    June 23, 2011

    It was a peaceful and lazy Sunday morning on December 26, 2004 off the coast of Sumatra in Indonesia. At 07:58 the earth suddenly shook violently and continued to tremble for almost ten minutes. Thus began one of the worst disasters the world had ever witnessed; a 9.2 magnitude earthquake at a depth of 30 kilometers beneath Indian Ocean, 255 kilometers off the coast of Banda Aceh in Sumatra and was followed by a Tsunami with waves as high as 30 meters. The result was over 240,000 people dead in 15 countries as far away as Yemen and South Africa.

    The emanation of disaster from one single point signified the centrality of Greater Indian Ocean to its littoral landmass ranging from Africa to the Greater Middle East to South Asia and to South East Asia. The massive humanitarian relief measures led primarily by the disparaging militaries of its littoral states and the US which by its large presence has almost become part of its greater littoral landmass also highlighted the unifying factor projected by the ocean. This also brought about the emergence of Eurasia as an interdependent geographical entity interwoven with its politico-economic and military imbroglios.

    During the Cold War era, outside of European geographical zone, denial of Soviet access to warm waters was one of the primary US objectives in Indian Ocean. The Gawader port project at the mouth of Persian Gulf in Pakistan is not a new idea. In the 1960s Pakistan was coerced by the US to shelve the project fearing a Soviet push through Afghanistan to the warm waters. The push however did come in the dying moments of Soviet empire in the late 1970s. This proved to be the nemesis of Soviet empire leading not only to its undoing but also changing the world order.

    Demise of Soviet Union also led to the shrinking of Europe’s geo-political significance. The US strategic focus thus increasingly shifted to become Asia-centric due to projected rise of new centers of politico-economic and military powers along the Indian Ocean Rim-land (IOR). Indian Ocean thus emerged as the centre of future power dynamics, conflict and military and trade activity in the 21st century. The theories of Alfred Thayer Mahan are likely to find new meanings when he said that, “Whoever controls the Indian Ocean dominates Asia. This ocean is the key to the seven seas in the twenty-first century, and that the destiny of the world will be decided in these waters.”

    Though the US initiated its Asia-centric policy precepts earlier, the military shift was formalized much later. US Navy in its maritime strategy formulated in late 2007, announced that the focus of its activities would now be Pacific and Indian Oceans instead of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans which remained its primary concern for decades. US Marine Corps followed with its vision statement in 2008, indicating Pacific and Indian Oceans as being its primary zones of operation.

    A major shift in US military strategy from being pre-dominantly Euro-centric Continental Strategic Format (primary land based operations) to Asia-centric Maritime Strategic Format (primary sea based operations) also emerged. This entailed maintaining US primacy and unhindered access to the Greater Indian Ocean including trade, energy and logistic transit zones and denial of Pacific to any inimical naval force which could threaten the US and its interests.

    Roughly 40 percent of all daily seaborne traded oil (or 20 percent of oil traded worldwide) passes through the Strait of Hormuz in Persian Gulf. Over 50,000 vessels transit the Strait of Malacca per year to gain access to South China Sea. If the strait were blocked, nearly half of the world’s fleet would be required to reroute around the Indonesian archipelago through Lombok Strait, located between the islands of Bali and Lombok, or the Sunda Strait, located between Java and Sumatra. Over 3,000 oil tankers pass through the Suez Canal, to and from Bab al Mandab annually.

    Transnational threats, including narco-terrorism, gun running, sea piracy, immigration control and assistance during natural disasters, have spawned a multitude of additional “out of area” operational roles for regional navies, and have dramatically increased the maritime security challenges. Countering these threats and challenges requires consistent cooperation between the affected states and the associated maritime agencies.

    IOR landmass is a heavily militarized zone but historically its Sea Lanes of Communications (SLOCs) have largely remained free of military intervention. And as majority of IOR states followed the Continental Strategy, naval forces have rarely been a strong element. However, India has been one of the exceptions as it selectively followed the Curzonian maritime strategy of dominance of Indian Ocean to maintain the largest naval force and militarized its outlying islands including Andaman and Nicobar situated at the mouth of strategic Malacca Straits.

    The deployment of Indian Navy however, is instructive in many ways. Two thirds of Indian naval forces are deployed along its western coast. The strategic Malacca Strait is covered by a small Tri-service Andaman and Nicobar Command. The major bias of operations is not towards the Eastern Indian Ocean which controls the entry into South China Sea against India’s declared enemy number one – China. The bias is towards Pakistan, domination of the strategic Straits of Hormuz in Persian Gulf and Bab el Mandab which links Mediterranean with Indian Greater Ocean through the Suez Canal.

    With introduction of US and its Allied naval powers in Indian Ocean though, Indian maritime power has largely been neutralized and its aspirations of Indian Ocean dominance severely undermined. With US 7th Fleet stationed in Japan and Chinese and Japanese naval powers operating in the South China Sea, which many analysts treat as an extension of Greater Indian Ocean, India can neither intrusively dominate the Malacca Straits nor can project its naval power into the South China Sea. With presence of US 5th Fleet in the Persian Gulf and the sensitivity of Middle Eastern and European powers towards Bab el Mandab, Indian naval power projection here is also a no-go. If for a reason, India threatens to disrupt the international SLOCs, it will invite the wrath of international community. Therefore, Indian Navy which by 2015 is slated to become the 3rd largest two aircraft carriers and nuclear submarines navy in the world, would mainly remain a coercive force in being, providing anti-piracy support.

    US, off-late has extensively engaged India enhancing the economic interaction and initiating a strategic partnership while attempting to garner Indian support for a countervailing and hedging effort against rising China. Apparently however, still immersed in the cold war farce of non-aligned neutrality syndrome, Indians have not reciprocated in the manner US expected it to. Therefore, without assimilating Japan and South Korea, India – US strategic partnership is likely to remain an intellectual strategic discussion forum and nothing beyond.


    The Chinese on the other hand have handled the regional affairs rather prudently and in a manner which is in consonance with their interests. Their first intent is quite apparent, that while maintaining a regional stability maintain an appropriate balance of power in the South China Sea. Concurrently they also intend to project southwards into the Indian Ocean in order to bypass the strategic choke points at Malacca, Sunda and Lambok Straits in order to gain direct access to Indian Ocean. At this stage however, there is no indication of an apparent Chinese intent to militarily intrude into the sensitive Pacific pathway leading to mainland US.

    In order to maintain appropriate balance of power in the South China Sea, current Chinese strategy is based on sea denial. For this their emphasis has been on induction of offensive weapon systems like the diesel and nuclear powered submarines (about 68 in number) and cutting edge shore to ship weapon engagement platforms. The recent news about development of shore based ballistic missiles to engage large moving targets at sea, 5th generation fighter bomber and future induction of aircraft carriers would have major strategic implications for the Greater Indian Ocean.

    China’s extension into the Indian Ocean is a strategic necessity for sustenance of her economic rise. However Chinese mainland does not border the shores of main Indian Ocean and can only transit through other littoral states. Pakistan and Myanmar are the only two states which can provide politically viable trade and energy transit zones. No wonder both these countries were not invited to become members of Indian sponsored, Indian Ocean Rim Association for Regional Cooperation (IORARC).

    In future therefore, these two countries by default would become an extension of China into the Indian Ocean and thus acquire strategic importance for China in geo-political and geo-strategic terms. In these emerging environments, an attempted Indian naval blockade of Pakistani ports would be construed as blockade of mainland China. In addition to this, US interests in Afghanistan and beyond are also supported through Pakistani ports. The colluding interests of US, China and Pakistan thus puts a limit on Indian navy’s coercive initiatives.


    US is not likely to obstruct Chinese entry into the strategic Indian Ocean zones and would even discourage India to counter such moves, provided the motive of such moves is primarily economic and not aimed at intrusive military presence. By not positioning its naval assets at ports it built in Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Myanmar, China has attempted to reinforce its non-military intent and dispel international concerns. Also, taking a leaf out of US strategy, the Chinese are responding in a quid pro quo by shaping and hedging of their own while continuing to improve and refine its response capabilities.

    A peaceful economic rise and development of IOR is a common objective for China as well as the US and other powers having interests in the IOR. It is a win-win situation for all and the best bet to ensure this is by maintenance of stability, at regional and sub-regional levels to limit the chances of a conflict, which may spiral out of control and may result in undermining this peaceful furtherance.

    Link: Greater Indian Ocean: A Peaceful Geo-Political Pivot Or A Contentious Source Of Hedging Eurasia Review
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