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  1. #61
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    4 security personnel killed, 8 injured as Maoists blow up security vehicle

    RAIPUR: Four security personnel were killed and eight others were injured as Maoists blew up a mine protected vehicle (MPV)near Cholnar in Chhattisgarh's Dantewada district on Monday.

    The anti-landmine vehicle was on a patrolling near Cholnar, about 25 Kms away from district headquarters of Dantewada, when the rebels triggered a powerful blast, targeting the anti-landmine vehicle. Civil officials have confirmed four deaths.

    Dantewada district superintendent of police Kamal Lochan Kashyap has reached the ambush site and is supervising relief and rescue operations.

    Earlier today, Naxals attacked a BSF team killing a jawan in Chhattisgarh's insurgency-hit Kanker district.

    Seven STF personnel were killed and ten others injured on Saturday when Naxals ambushed them in the forests of restive Pidmel village under Polampalli, around 450 kms from state capital Raipur.

    Naxals yesterday allegedly set ablaze at least 17 vehicles engaged in mining work in Kanker district, 140 km from here. However, no one was injured.

    http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/i...w/46906598.cms

  2. #62
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    India: Maoists, False Starts, Critical Losses

    – Analysis of Communist Party of India (Maoist)

    As Prime Minister Narendra Modi addressed a public gathering in Dantewada in the heart of the Communist Party of India-Maoist (CPI-Maoist) insurgency-affected Bastar Division in Chhattisgarh on May 9, 2015, the Maoists registered their symbolic opposition. A call for a Bastar bandh (general shutdown strike) was issued and, in the Munga Forest of Sukma District (earlier a part of Dantewada), just 80 kilometres from the Prime Minister’s meet, the Maoists ‘abducted’ over 200 villagers to hold a praja court (‘people’s court’, an euphemism for Kangaroo court) at Gaadem and killed a villager, identified as Sadaram Nag of Marenga village.

    Early in the morning of May 9, a few hours before the Prime Minister’s visit, a large number of armed Maoists descended on Marenga,Tikanpal, Tahakwada and Junapan villages (under Tongpal Police Station) and herded more than 200 people into the praja court. The villagers were supporting the construction of a bridge on Baru river near Marenga and some of them were working there as construction workers. Sadaram, who was killed, was looking after the construction of the bridge. According to media reports, the villagers of Marenga wanted a bridge to be constructed near the village and decided to help the District administration in its construction, much to the displeasure of the Maoists. A day earlier, on May 8, the Maoists had threatened locals for their support to the construction and their failure to cooperate with the Maoists. Further, when villagers of surrounding areas launched a protest in the last week of February 2015 against the arrest of a suspected Maoist, identified as Hidma, villagers from these four villages had not taken part in the protest.

    On May 3, 2015, the Maoists had killed two villagers from the east Godavari District in Andhra Pradesh, just across the State border, after another praja court in Sukma District, suspecting them to be Police informers.

    As Bastar emerges as the nucleus of Maoist tactical counter offensive in the face of shrinking activities in other States, the Maoists had ambitiously announced their move in the South. In the recent issue of People’s March (Vol.13, No 3, Jan-March 2015), the Maoists claimed to have launched a ‘politico-military campaign’ in Kerala and announced the opening up of a ‘new war front’ in the Sahyadri Hills in the Kerala-Karnataka-Tamil Nadu tri-junction area.

    However, that plan took a big hit with the arrest of five Maoists, including Roopesh and his wife Shyna, from a bakery in Karumathampatti in Coimbatore District, Tamil Nadu, in the evening of May 4, 2015. Roopesh was in charge of the CPI-Maoist’s Western Ghats Special Zonal Committee (WGSZC) and was believed to be leading the Maoist movement in Kerala. He has some 20 criminal cases against him registered in Kerala. The other Maoists arrested with him were identified as Anoop Mathew George, Kannan and Eswaran.

    Based on specific inputs from the Telangana and Andhra Pradesh Police, the arrests were made by the ‘Q’ Branch of Tamil Nadu Police. Addressing a Press Conference on May 7, 2015, Kerala Home Minister Ramesh Chennithala observed that he regarded the arrests as a “critical turning point” in the fight against Maoist infiltration, achieved through the concerted efforts of the Police forces of Kerala, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh.

    Preliminary enquiries revealed that the Maoist couple had lived in a house in Tirupur since August 2012. They posed as being involved in the Information Technology business and export of disposable cups, and seldom interacted with neighbours. Police searched the house on May 7 and seized hundreds of books, CDs and electronic gadgets. Given the number of books, electronic gadgets and mobile phones in the house, Police suspect the house was used as a hub for Maoist propaganda. Police also suspect that Roopesh had convened a meeting of the WGSZC in Karumanthampatti to plot an armed insurrection in Andhra Pradesh, in retaliation to the encounter killings of 20 persons at Seshachalam hill ranges near Chittoor. Twenty woodcutters from Tamil Nadu, found felling red sanders, were killed in an alleged encounter by Andhra Pradesh Police at Eethakunta in the Seshachalam hills in Chittoor District of Andhra Pradesh on April 5, 2015. There was a hue and cry against the encounter and, taking suo moto cognizance of the incident, the National Human Rights Commission (NHRC) has issued notices to the Andhra Pradesh Chief Secretary and Director General of Police while the Chittoor administration has ordered a magisterial inquiry.

    Roopesh, a law graduate from Thrissur (Kerala) with a diploma in Information Technology, has allegedly been involved in some 20 criminal cases in Kerala. Police claim he was among the most wanted Maoist leaders in the country, and one Police official stated, “It is a big catch. Roopesh was leading Maoist operations in the tri-junction and involved in the attacks on forest establishments in Kerala and also on some MNC retail outlets. His wife Shyna was working as clerk in the Kerala High Court and later joined the Maoists.”

    Roopesh wrote a novel in 2013, which was published by two publishing houses in Kerala under two different titles — ‘Maoist’ and ‘Vasanthathile Poomarangal (Flowering trees of spring)’. Shyna was in the news in 2011 after she wrote a letter to Chief Minister Oommen Chandy seeking action against Police officials who allegedly harassed her 71-year old mother and her two children, who live in Thrissur District.

    The couple came under the radar of intelligence agencies after they allegedly gave shelter to Malla Raji Reddy, a CPI-Maoist Politburo member arrested in 2007 from Angamali in Kerala. [Malla Raji Reddy has since jumped bail and joined the Maoist underground movement again] Although Shyna was also arrested in the case, she was released on bail in 2008 and then went underground.

    The couple attracted further Police notice after the Kerala Police arrested five persons for holding a secret meeting of the Revolutionary Democratic Front (RDF), a front organisation of the CPI-Maoist, at a lodge in Mavelikkara, Alappuzha District, on December 29, 2012. While Police arrested the five persons, including Gopal, a former scientist at the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, they let off two minors in the incident. The Police had identified the two minors as daughters of the Maoist couple, Roopesh and Shyna. The case was later handed over to the National Investigation Agency (NIA) which, on April 22, 2015, filed a charge sheet against the five persons.

    Not much is known about the other Maoists who were arrested along with Roopesh. Kannan of Madurai has been an active member of the Maoist movement for over two decades and remained underground since 1990. Kannan, the son of a Police constable, escaped from the scene when Naveen, an alleged Maoist leader, was shot dead near Kodaikanal in 2008.

    According to media reports, Anoop started as a Students Federation of India (SFI) leader, but severed links with SFI on ideological grounds after his polytechnic days. In 2011, he went to the Gulf, but returned to his native place Ranni in the Pathanamthitta District of Kerala after a few months. After his return, he expressed his desire to work for tribals and visited Thiruvananthapuram and Kozhikode many times. Since 2012, he stopped communicating with his family.

    The Kerala Police disclosed that they had intensified their efforts to “deny any operational base” to the armed comrades of arrested Maoist leader Roopesh. An official identified the prominent members of the unit as Vikram Gowda, Mahesh aka Jayanna, A. Suresh, Latha, Kanya, aka Kanyakumari, and Sundari aka Geeta, all hailing from the Malnad region in Karnataka.

    Perhaps more consequential is the arrest of K. Muralidharan aka Thomas Joseph aka Ajith (62) with his aide Ismail Hamaza Chiragpilli aka Pravin aka James Mathew (29) from the Talegaon Dabhade area, located about 30 kilometres from Pune city. Murali, the son of former diplomat Kannamballi Karunakara Menon, was the secretary of CPI-ML (Naxalbari) before the party merged with the CPI-Maoist on May 1, 2014. He is believed to have been inducted into the Maoist Central Committee after the merger. He wrote books and articles under the pen name Ajith and was probably tasked with countering the ideological attack on the party.

    Ajith and Ismail were living in a plush apartment in the Lotus Villa building in Talegaon Dabhade, and Ajith was undergoing treatment for some ailments in Moraya Hospital. His aide Ismail is also a native of Kerala and hails from its Malappuram District. He was also a part of CPI-ML (Naxalbari) and later joined CPI-Maoist after the merger.

    While the Maoists’ attempts to establish a stronghold in the South have again received a setback, the movement remains strong in the Bastar area of Chhattisgarh. Meanwhile, the NDA Government at the Centre, which came to power with a promise of a stronger response to the Maoist insurgency, is yet to give Cabinet approval to the draft policy prepared by the Union Ministry of Home Affairs (UMHA) even as it approaches the completion of one year in power. Moreover, the Prime Minister has signed MoUs worth INR 240 billion in Dantewada, a development that flies in the face of the draft UMHA policy, which states that developmental works in highly affected areas should follow after successful security interventions. As discussed earlier in SAIR, the policy decision to leave the Modernisation of the Police Force Scheme as well as all developmental works in the Maoist affected areas to the States is also likely to be counter-productive.

    At a time when the Maoists themselves acknowledge dramatic reverses of fortune, inadequate policy support to anti-Maoist campaigns can provide the rebels with much needed breathing space. Incoherence of policy has been the bane of counter-insurgency efforts for decades, and the present dispensation, despite a range of successes that have little connection to policy decisions, demonstrates little evidence of any greater strategic vision. The Maoists have proven their resilience again and again, and if the State falters, they are sure to recover, inflicting the burden of response once again on the hapless SFs that have borne the consequence of political incompetence, mischief and failure for decades.

    * Fakir Mohan Pradhan


    http://www.eurasiareview.com/1105201...sses-analysis/

  3. #63
    Senior Member Fassi's Avatar
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    Afghanistan: Development or militarization?

    Afghanistan’s 2014 presidential election was largely projected as a “make or break” point for the future of democracy in Afghanistan. Not only did U.S. officials hail this ‘successful democratic transition’ and ‘peaceful’ transfer of power, they also had us believe that democracy “is actually” gaining ground in Afghanistan. Whether or not democracy was or is gaining ground in Afghanistan is a moot question; however, what is clearly evident is that the U.S. and its allies do repeat this success story quite often to demonstrate their “success” in “civilizing” Afghanistan. In simple words, this success story serves as a perfect excuse for them to justify the need for strengthening Afghanistan’s military. The notorious argument, repeated on quite a few occasions, goes as follows:

    Since Afghanistan is politically “stable” now, the need of the hour is to bolster Afghanistan’s defesce apparatuses so that re-emergence of the Taliban as Afghanistan’s sole rulers could be avoided. As is evident, after successful democratic transition, military transition is the next “logical” step.

    While it is true that a strong Afghan military can be an effective guard against the Taliban, it is not necessary that it should be developed at the expense of “democracy.” Afghanistan’s democracy, the seeds of which were unfortunately and actually sown under the shadows of B-52 bombers, is plagued with many problems of high magnitude. In September 2014, John Sopko, the special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction, was reportedly claimed that Afghanistan, “remains under assault by insurgents and is short of domestic revenue, plagued by corruption, afflicted by criminal elements involved in opium and smuggling, and struggling to execute basic functions of government.” Although he was critical of the then prevailing situation, his criticism went largely unheeded. Notwithstanding the “defects” he mentioned, a high magnitude problem — the problem of over-developing military at the expense of civil institutions and social sector developments — has not only largely been ignored but actually presented as a partly successful effort on the part of the U.S. to strengthen Afghanistan.

    Given the extent of what’s being spent on these two separate aspects of the Afghan polity, it appears that the U.S. and its allies are more interested in strengthening Afghan militarily than in helping democracy and civil institutions flourish — hence, numerous local and national defense institutions including the Afghan National Army, Police, and Afghan Local Police have benefited.

    According to figures issued in February 2015 by the office of Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR), which has closely audited the U.S.’s successes and failings in Afghanistan, the U.S. Congress has so far appropriated more than $65 billion for the establishment of and continuous support for the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF). Its reports also reveal that a further $104 billion has so far been spent on reconstruction and infrastructure projects. However, it is also quite evident, the report says, that the money spent on many (so-called) reconstruction and development projects has been wasted, used on ineffective and useless projects, or even stolen through fraudulent schemes. Many in Afghanistan believe that a lot of money has not been spent on reconstruction projects at all; rather it was and continues to be spent on supporting private militias managed by many members of the previous and current Afghan Parliament. The U.S. government has classified information about the amount of money so far spent on this particular aspect of “development.”

    In this behalf, John Sopko was also reported to have said that, “for the first time ever, (the SIGAR was) unable to publicly report to the American taxpayer on the status of a large portion of their over $60 billion investment.” In addition, a quarterly report issued by SIGAR in January 2013 revealed that the U.S. has actually spent more than half of the nearly $100 billion in Afghan reconstruction funds on developing the country’s police and security forces. This diversion of resources from reconstruction and development to establishing security apparatuses is a clear indication of the objective the U.S. aims to achieve in Afghanistan: a militarized Afghan polity rather than a democratic Afghan republic.

    This also become evident when we take into consideration SIGAR’s other report which also clearly exposes the “effectiveness” of and the “efficiency” with which development and reconstructions projects were undertaken. According to it, the “U.S. assistance has been provided for reconstruction without the benefit of a comprehensive anti-corruption strategy.” The result being that most of the money ends up benefiting the erstwhile commanders of the Northern Alliance and other privately managed militias. As a matter of fact, some even go to the extent of claiming that a lot of money provided by the U.S. actually ends up supporting the Taliban. As it stands, the U.S. seems to be more willing to prepare a private army along with the Afghan national army to fight the Taliban and sustain its own dominance in Afghanistan than to physically develop Afghanistan, create job opportunities etc.

    That the “classified” money has been most probably spent on establishing private as well as public militias also becomes evident when we take into account the fact that in many parts of Afghanistan, governors or members of parliament run their own militias under the banner of ALP (Afghan Local Police), using the pretext of fighting insurgents. But they actually use this force to terrorize the local population. For instance, the ALP, a local security force established in 2010, has been a particularly destructive force, says a study conducted by Human Rights Watch, as far as the security of life and property of common people is concerned. Such groups are not just a source of power for local politicians. They also work as a hedge against any popular opposition, and are further used to guard poppy cultivation, grab land, murder political opponents, run torture houses, and accompany U.S. forces in raids and patrols. According to some credible reports, many of the previously militant (anti-Taliban) commanders were, on purpose, hired by the U.S. forces to expand their human intelligence sources. For instance, Abdul Hakim Shujoyi, a militia leader in central Afghanistan’s Uruzgan province, became an ALP commander in 2011 at the insistence of U.S. forces. He is reported to have personally murdered civilians, including a rampage in July 2011 when he shot dead 7 villagers and set fire to their crops. He is still at large and continues to operate as freely as ever, and is being protected by the Afghan government.

    The Afghan government itself is also focusing increasingly on developing its state security apparatus. For instance, in its bid to outfight and outgun the Taliban, the Afghan government — mostly using U.S. funds — spends over $2.44 billion per year equipping its overall military force. These expenses alone — which go toward purchasing aircraft, vehicles, weapons, body armor and other equipment — are much more than what is actually spent on other so-called development projects. In addition, the Afghan government devotes $844 million to training its army, or $4,965 per soldier. Furthermore, soldiers are paid an average of just $1,872 a year, but the overall cost of training and fielding a police officer is roughly $30,000 per year, while the cost of each soldier is nearly $46,000 per year.

    This money is much more than what is being spent on, for example, education. According to a report by Jeaniene Spink of Oxford University, “there is proportionately little or no support for pre-primary, secondary or tertiary education. Frustrated in their educational ambitions, many children are forced to leave school after primary completion. Lack of opportunities to train as doctors, nurses, lawyers, teachers or engineers means that many Afghans are now choosing to return to Pakistan where there are better educational prospects.” Similarly, summarizing the “effectiveness” of the so-called reconstruction projects, a report of the International Crisis Group says, “despite billions of dollars in aid, state institutions (in Afghanistan) remain fragile and unable to provide good governance, deliver basic services to the majority of the population or guarantee human security.”

    Notwithstanding this marked discrepancy, the most astonishing fact is that the Afghan security apparatus, including Afghan National Army, is still not only incapable of solely countering the Taliban but also continues to suffer from many operational and tactical deficiencies. No wonder, the U.S. training mission had to acknowledge in 2014 that none of the Afghan forces, both civil armed forces and the army, were able to fight the war on their own. Ironically, one of the most important reasons cited for this lack of capability is illiteracy in Afghanistan in general and among Afghan police and military specifically. And, as indicated earlier, the state of education in Afghanistan is itself too dismal to make a meaningful impact on this issue.

    Instead of focusing on rebuilding Afghanistan, the U.S. and Afghanistan’s successive governments have been and still are focusing on one simple issue: developing and strengthening the Afghan security forces. For the U.S., Afghan forces stand to replace the U.S. and NATO forces; for the Afghan government, these forces are their only hope against the Taliban. Their focus is, under these circumstances, warranted but by no means justified — hence, the question: Where will the Afghan polity stand when so much is being spent on developing security forces? Will it have the same kind of militarized polity Pakistan has today? Note that Pakistan’s military, too, was developed, aided and trained by the U.S. during the Cold War to contain communism. Today, Afghan security forces are being developed on similar lines. Afghanistan, just like Pakistan, continues to suffer from lack of governance, while security forces, in both countries, continue to flourish.

    Salman Rafi Sheikh is a freelance journalist and research analyst of international relations and Pakistan affairs. His area of interest is South and West Asian politics, the foreign policies of major powers, and Pakistani politics.

    http://atimes.com/2015/05/afghanista...ilitarization/

  4. #64
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by ajtr View Post
    TTP are terrorists..maoists are revolutionaries.They are not insurgents,millitant terrorists as indians are try hard to brand them as....If maoists are terrorists then bhagat singh,netaji were all terrorist according to your logic.
    Wow,totally amazed by your thoughts! what i can interpret from your logic and thoughts is that bhagat singh,shubhash chandra bose and other freedom fighters used to kill innocent people or used them as their leverage over britishers(that govt.) to fight against them.Not only this,according to you,maoists are revolutionaries like them following their path but i dont remember at all when they used to rape women and kill innocent govt. officials.
    Can u enlighten me more about this??

  5. #65
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by ajtr View Post
    or say they blowing up schools used by indian forces used as garriasons and GoI propaganda machinery use that as saying maoists blowing up schools so kids cant study.
    For british bhagat singh et al were terrorists.for allied powers and jews nataji was nothing less than hitler.
    I sometimes wonder how u pakistanis sitting across the border, get to know that the school blown up is done by GoI not maoists.Are u sure it is not the propaganda used by your media to defame a country with whom u have a war history?
    sometimes it makes me wonder that if pakistan intelligence is that excellent that they could uncover our govt. ill-deeds,how come they never put a brake on terrorism in pakistan!!

  6. #66
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by Felix View Post
    lol - the propaganda machine is running overtime.
    The Maoist movement has every type of propaganda and lies thrown at their feet. Truth is their fight is legitimate and will continue to thrive.
    Prove it!! how it is legitimate??how u justify the killing of innocent people,taking leverage of innocent people??

  7. #67
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by KingKong View Post
    The agenda is your denial there is any Maoist issue in your country. The issue is the self burial of your heads in the ground assuming you have no issues. Thats the issue. If you are unaware of the agenda of the Maoist then google it and then come back but please dint be a.....
    We do have a maoist issue but their way of sorting out things to fulfill their agenda is not justified at all..

  8. #68
    Senior Member Hope's Avatar
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by Goku View Post
    I sometimes wonder how u pakistanis sitting across the border, get to know that the school blown up is done by GoI not maoists.Are u sure it is not the propaganda used by your media to defame a country with whom u have a war history?
    sometimes it makes me wonder that if pakistan intelligence is that excellent that they could uncover our govt. ill-deeds,how come they never put a brake on terrorism in pakistan!!
    ajtr is Indian btw.

  9. #69
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by Hope View Post
    ajtr is Indian btw.
    She is a confused soul.

    Confused with her nation, confused with her religion.
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  10. #70
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by Hope View Post
    ajtr is Indian btw.
    I'm aware of that but I think she is pakistani resident..

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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by Goku View Post
    I'm aware of that but I think she is pakistani resident..
    Lets not postmortem her identity.
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by PoKeMon View Post
    Lets not postmortem her identity.
    You already did. Post 69

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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by Pak92 View Post
    You already did. Post 69
    I did a small incision only.
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by PoKeMon View Post
    I did a small incision only.
    You are wanting to be a [MENTION=43]safriz[/MENTION]

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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    India police kill '12 Maoist rebels' in Jharkhand

    Police in the eastern Indian state of Jharkhand say they have killed at least 12 suspected Maoist rebels in a clash.

    The fighting on early Tuesday took place in the forests of Palamau district, which is considered a rebel stronghold.

    Police said they had recovered automatic guns from the rebels. There were no police casualties, they added.

    The Maoists say they are fighting for communist rule and greater rights for tribal people and the rural poor.

    Their insurgency began in the eastern state of West Bengal in the late 1960s, spreading to more than one-third of India's 600-plus administrative districts.

    The details of Tuesday's clashes are sketchy - some reports said the rebels, who were travelling in two cars, opened fire at the policemen when they were stopped for a security check.

    Police said they were trying to verify the identities of the men killed in the clash.

    Major military and police offensives in recent years have pushed Maoist rebels back to their forest strongholds and levels of violence have fallen.

    But hit-and-run attacks are still common, killing hundreds of people every year.

    In December, Maoists killed at least 14 paramilitary policemen in an ambush in the central Indian state of Chhattisgarh.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-india-33059113

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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    India's Maoist rebels kill four abducted policemen

    RAIPUR: India's Maoist rebels have killed four policemen they abducted from a bus in the restive central state of Chhattisgarh, a senior officer said Wednesday.

    The guerrillas stopped the bus transporting the security personnel as it was passing through the Maoist-dominated Kutru village in Bijapur district late Monday.

    "We have been informed that the four abducted police personnel have been killed by the Maoists. The bodies were thrown on the roadside near a forested area," police superintendent KL Dhruv told AFP. "Police parties have been sent out to the jungles to hunt for the culprits."

    The bodies were discovered close to the area where they were abducted, raising doubts about the search operations that police said had been launched immediately after the abductions.

    The rebels, who claim to be fighting for the rights of poor tribal minorities and farmers, have waged a decades-long battle across central and eastern Indian states to overthrow government authorities.

    The government describes the Maoist insurgency as the country's most serious internal security threat.

    http://www.dawn.com/news/1194609/ind...cted-policemen

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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    These buggers are creating havoc in India.

  18. #78
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Suspected Maoist rebels kill seven in eastern India

    NEW DELHI: Suspected Maoist rebels attacked a police convoy in a remote part of eastern India, killing five officers and two civilians, police said Thursday.

    The attackers set off a powerful landmine blast before opening fire on the convoy, which was on an anti-Maoist operation in the forests of Jharkhand state on Wednesday.

    “Seven people died in yesterday's landmine blast,” police officer Nav Kumar Singh told AFP by phone from Palamu district, 190 kilometres from the state capital Ranchi.

    “Five were police officers, one was the driver and the other a guard."

    He said another six police were wounded and a search operation was under way.

    The ambush is the latest in a simmering conflict that pits the insurgents against security forces in remote areas of India.

    The rebels, who claim to be fighting for the rights of poor tribal minorities and farmers, have waged a decades-long battle across central and eastern Indian states to overthrow government authorities.

    The Maoist insurgency has claimed thousands of lives, and was described by former prime minister Manmohan Singh as the country's most serious internal security threat.

    Government critics say attempts to end the revolt through tough security offensives are doomed to fail, and the real solution is better governance and development of the region.
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    Re: 'Maoist problem biggest security threat for CRPF'

    Quote Originally Posted by Express View Post
    Suspected Maoist rebels kill seven in eastern India

    NEW DELHI: Suspected Maoist rebels attacked a police convoy in a remote part of eastern India, killing five officers and two civilians, police said Thursday.

    The attackers set off a powerful landmine blast before opening fire on the convoy, which was on an anti-Maoist operation in the forests of Jharkhand state on Wednesday.

    “Seven people died in yesterday's landmine blast,” police officer Nav Kumar Singh told AFP by phone from Palamu district, 190 kilometres from the state capital Ranchi.

    “Five were police officers, one was the driver and the other a guard."

    He said another six police were wounded and a search operation was under way.

    The ambush is the latest in a simmering conflict that pits the insurgents against security forces in remote areas of India.

    The rebels, who claim to be fighting for the rights of poor tribal minorities and farmers, have waged a decades-long battle across central and eastern Indian states to overthrow government authorities.

    The Maoist insurgency has claimed thousands of lives, and was described by former prime minister Manmohan Singh as the country's most serious internal security threat.

    Government critics say attempts to end the revolt through tough security offensives are doomed to fail, and the real solution is better governance and development of the region.
    Maybe sit down and negotiate with them.

    RIP

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